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Original Articles
Nutrition
Association of malnutrition status with 30-day mortality in patients with sepsis using objective nutritional indices: a multicenter retrospective study in South Korea
Moon Seong Baek, Young Suk Kwon, Sang Soo Kang, Daechul Shim, Youngsang Yoon, Jong Ho Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):127-137.   Published online February 20, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01613
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
The Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) score and the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) have emerged as important nutritional indices because they provide an objective assessment based on data. We aimed to investigate how these nutritional indices relate to outcomes in patients with sepsis. Methods: Data were collected retrospectively at five hospitals for patients aged ≥18 years receiving treatment for sepsis between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2021. Serum albumin and total cholesterol concentrations, and peripheral lymphocytes were used to calculate the CONUT score and PNI. To identify predictors correlated with 30-day mortality, analyses were conducted using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The 30-day mortality rate among 9,763 patients was 15.8% (n=1,546). The median CONUT score was 5 (interquartile range [IQR], 3–7) and the median PNI score was 39.6 (IQR, 33.846.4). Higher 30-day mortality rates were associated with individuals with moderate (CONUT score: 5–8; PNI: 35–38) or severe (CONUT: 9–12; PNI: <35) malnutrition compared with those with no malnutrition (CONUT: 0–1; PNI: >38). With CONUT scores, the hazard ratio (HR) associated with moderate malnutrition was 1.52 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24–1.87; P<0.001); for severe, HR=2.42 (95% CI, 1.95–3.02; P<0.001). With PNI scores, the HR for moderate malnutrition was 1.29 (95% CI, 1.09–1.53; P=0.003); for severe, HR=1.88 (95% CI, 1.67–2.12; P<0.001). Conclusions: The nutritional indices CONUT score and PNI showed significant associations with mortality of sepsis patients within 30 days.
Pediatrics
Development of a deep learning model for predicting critical events in a pediatric intensive care unit
In Kyung Lee, Bongjin Lee, June Dong Park
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):186-191.   Published online February 20, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01424
Correction in: https://doi.org/
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  • 43 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Identifying critically ill patients at risk of cardiac arrest is important because it offers the opportunity for early intervention and increased survival. The aim of this study was to develop a deep learning model to predict critical events, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation or mortality. Methods: This retrospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary university hospital. All patients younger than 18 years who were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit from January 2010 to May 2023 were included. The main outcome was prediction performance of the deep learning model at forecasting critical events. Long short-term memory was used as a deep learning algorithm. The five-fold cross validation method was employed for model learning and testing. Results: Among the vital sign measurements collected during the study period, 11,660 measurements were used to develop the model after preprocessing; 1,060 of these data points were measurements that corresponded to critical events. The prediction performance of the model was the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (95% confidence interval) of 0.988 (0.9751.000), and the area under the precision-recall curve was 0.862 (0.700–1.000). Conclusions: The performance of the developed model at predicting critical events was excellent. However, follow-up research is needed for external validation.
Trauma
Role of platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio at the time of arrival to the emergency room as a predictor of short-term mortality in trauma patients with severe trauma team activation
Jae Kwang Kim, Kyung Hoon Sun
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):146-154.   Published online February 15, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01319
  • 456 View
  • 24 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Platelet-to-Lymphocyte ratio (PLR) has been studied as a prognostic factor for various diseases and traumas. This study examined the utility of PLR as a tool for predicting 30-day mortality in patients experiencing severe trauma. Methods: This study included 139 patients who experienced trauma and fulfilled ≥1 criteria for activation of the hospital’s severe trauma team. Patients were divided into non-survivor and survivor groups. Mean PLR values were compared between the groups, the optimal PLR cut-off value was determined, and mortality and survival analyses were performed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 26.0. The threshold of statistical significance was P<0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in mean (±standard deviation) PLR between the non-survivor (n=36) and survivor (n=103) groups (53.4±30.1 vs. 89.9±53.3, respectively; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed an optimal PLR cut-off of 65.35 (sensitivity, 0.621; specificity, 0.694, respectively; area under the ROC curve, 0.742), and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a significant difference in mortality rate between the two groups. Conclusions: PLR can be calculated quickly and easily from a routine complete blood count, which is often performed in the emergency department for individuals who experience trauma. The PLR is useful for predicting 30-day mortality in trauma patients with severe trauma team activation.
Pulmonary
Early bronchoscopy in severe pneumonia patients in intensive care unit: insights from the Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care-IV database analysis
Chiwon Ahn, Yeonkyung Park, Yoonseok Oh
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):179-185.   Published online February 15, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01165
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Pneumonia frequently leads to intensive care unit (ICU) admission and is associated with a high mortality risk. This study aimed to assess the impact of early bronchoscopy administered within 3 days of ICU admission on mortality in patients with pneumonia using the Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care-IV (MIMIC-IV) database. Methods: A single-center retrospective analysis was conducted using the MIMIC-IV data from 2008 to 2019. Adult ICU-admitted patients diagnosed with pneumonia were included in this study. The patients were stratified into two cohorts based on whether they underwent early bronchoscopy. The primary outcome was the 28-day mortality rate. Propensity score matching was used to balance confounding variables. Results: In total, 8,916 patients with pneumonia were included in the analysis. Among them, 783 patients underwent early bronchoscopy within 3 days of ICU admission, whereas 8,133 patients did not undergo early bronchoscopy. The primary outcome of the 28-day mortality between two groups had no significant difference even after propensity matched cohorts (22.7% vs. 24.0%, P=0.589). Patients undergoing early bronchoscopy had prolonged ICU (P<0.001) and hospital stays (P<0.001) and were less likely to be discharged to home (P<0.001). Conclusions: Early bronchoscopy in severe pneumonia patients in the ICU did not reduce mortality but was associated with longer hospital stays, suggesting it was used in more severe cases. Therefore, when considering bronchoscopy for these patients, it's important to tailor the decision to each individual case, thoughtfully balancing the possible advantages with the related risks.
Pulmonary
Association between mechanical power and intensive care unit mortality in Korean patients under pressure-controlled ventilation
Jae Kyeom Sim, Sang-Min Lee, Hyung Koo Kang, Kyung Chan Kim, Young Sam Kim, Yun Seong Kim, Won-Yeon Lee, Sunghoon Park, So Young Park, Ju-Hee Park, Yun Su Sim, Kwangha Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jin Hwa Lee, Heung Bum Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Ji Young Hong, Won Jun Song, Gee Young Suh
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):91-99.   Published online January 26, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00871
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Mechanical power (MP) has been reported to be associated with clinical outcomes. Because the original MP equation is derived from paralyzed patients under volume-controlled ventilation, its application in practice could be limited in patients receiving pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV). Recently, a simplified equation for patients under PCV was developed. We investigated the association between MP and intensive care unit (ICU) mortality. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of Korean data from the Fourth International Study of Mechanical Ventilation. We extracted data of patients under PCV on day 1 and calculated MP using the following simplified equation: MPPCV = 0.098 ∙ respiratory rate ∙ tidal volume ∙ (ΔPinsp + positive end-expiratory pressure), where ΔPinsp is the change in airway pressure during inspiration. Patients were divided into survivors and non-survivors and then compared. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine association between MPPCV and ICU mortality. The interaction of MPPCV and use of neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) was also analyzed. Results: A total of 125 patients was eligible for final analysis, of whom 38 died in the ICU. MPPCV was higher in non-survivors (17.6 vs. 26.3 J/min, P<0.001). In logistic regression analysis, only MPPCV was significantly associated with ICU mortality (odds ratio, 1.090; 95% confidence interval, 1.029–1.155; P=0.003). There was no significant effect of the interaction between MPPCV and use of NMBA on ICU mortality (P=0.579). Conclusions: MPPCV is associated with ICU mortality in patients mechanically ventilated with PCV mode, regardless of NMBA use.
Review Article
Ethics
Impact of institutional case volume on intensive care unit mortality
Christine Kang, Ho Geol Ryu
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):151-159.   Published online May 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00689
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The primary aim of this review is to explore current knowledge on the relationship between institutional intensive care unit (ICU) patient volume and patient outcomes. Studies indicate that a higher institutional ICU patient volume is positively correlated with patient survival. Although the exact mechanism underlying this association remains unclear, several studies have proposed that the cumulative experience of physicians and selective referral between institutions may play a role. The overall ICU mortality rate in Korea is relatively high compared to other developed countries. A distinctive aspect of critical care in Korea is the existence of significant disparities in the quality of care and services provided across regions and hospitals. Addressing these disparities and optimizing the management of critically ill patients necessitates thoroughly trained intensivists who are well-versed in the latest clinical practice guidelines. A fully functioning unit with adequate patient throughput is also essential for maintaining consistent and reliable quality of patient care. However, the positive impact of ICU volume on mortality outcomes is also linked to complex organizational factors, such as multidisciplinary rounds, nurse staffing and education, the presence of a clinical pharmacist, care protocols for weaning and sedation, and a culture of teamwork and communication. Despite some inconsistencies in the association between ICU patient volume and patient outcomes, which are thought to arise from differences in healthcare systems, ICU case volume significantly affects patient outcomes and should be taken into account when formulating related healthcare policies.
Original Articles
Epidemiology
Risk factors for hospital mortality in intensive care unit survivors: a retrospective cohort study
Luiza Gabriella Antonio e Silva, Claudia Maria Dantas de Maio Carrilho, Thalita Bento Talizin, Lucienne Tibery Queiroz Cardoso, Edson Lopes Lavado, Cintia Magalhães Carvalho Grion
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):68-75.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01375
  • 2,118 View
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  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Deaths can occur after a patient has survived treatment for a serious illness in an intensive care unit (ICU). Mortality rates after leaving the ICU can be considered indicators of health care quality. This study aims to describe risk factors and mortality of surviving patients discharged from an ICU in a university hospital. Methods: Retrospective cohort study carried out from January 2017 to December 2018. Data on age, sex, length of hospital stay, diagnosis on admission to the ICU, hospital discharge outcome, presence of infection, and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) III prognostic score were collected. Infected patients were considered as those being treated for an infection on discharge from the ICU. Patients were divided into survivors and non-survivors on leaving the hospital. The association between the studied variables was performed using the logistic regression model. Results: A total of 1,025 patients who survived hospitalization in the ICU were analyzed, of which 212 (20.7%) died after leaving the ICU. When separating the groups of survivors and non-survivors according to hospital outcome, the median age was higher among non-survivors. Longer hospital stays and higher SAPS III values were observed among non-survivors. In the logistic regression, the variables age, length of hospital stay, SAPS III, presence of infection, and readmission to the ICU were associated with hospital mortality. Conclusions: Infection on ICU discharge, ICU readmission, age, length of hospital stay, and SAPS III increased risk of death in ICU survivors.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of the infectious agent’s structure and antibiotic resistance parameters in patients in intensive care units of a multidisciplinary hospital
    O. I. Butranova, S. K. Zyryanov, A. A. Gorbacheva, G A. Putsman
    Kachestvennaya Klinicheskaya Praktika = Good Clinical Practice.2024; (4): 4.     CrossRef
Trauma
Selection of appropriate reference creatinine estimate for acute kidney injury diagnosis in patients with severe trauma
Kangho Lee, Dongyeon Ryu, Hohyun Kim, Sungjin Park, Sangbong Lee, Chanik Park, Gilhwan Kim, Sunhyun Kim, Nahyeon Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):95-103.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01046
  • 1,340 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
In patients with severe trauma, the diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI) is important because it is a predictive factor for poor prognosis and can affect patient care. The diagnosis and staging of AKI are based on change in serum creatinine (SCr) levels from baseline. However, baseline creatinine levels in patients with traumatic injuries are often unknown, making the diagnosis of AKI in trauma patients difficult. This study aimed to enhance the accuracy of AKI diagnosis in trauma patients by presenting an appropriate reference creatinine estimate (RCE). Methods: We reviewed adult patients with severe trauma requiring intensive care unit admission between 2015 and 2019 (n=3,228) at a single regional trauma center in South Korea. AKI was diagnosed based on the current guideline published by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes organization. AKI was determined using the following RCEs: estimated SCr75-modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD), trauma MDRD (TMDRD), admission creatinine level, and first-day creatinine nadir. We assessed inclusivity, prognostic ability, and incrementality using the different RCEs. Results: The incidence of AKI varied from 15% to 46% according to the RCE used. The receiver operating characteristic curve of TMDRD used to predict mortality and the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) had the highest value and was statistically significant (0.797, P<0.001; 0.890, P=0.002, respectively). In addition, the use of TMDRD resulted in a mortality prognostic ability and the need for RRT was incremental with AKI stage. Conclusions: In this study, TMDRD was feasible as a RCE, resulting in optimal post-traumatic AKI diagnosis and prognosis.
Pulmonary
Characteristics and outcomes of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the intensive care unit due to acute hypercapnic respiratory failure
Türkay Akbaş, Harun Güneş
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):49-56.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01011
  • 2,318 View
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  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The study aimed to describe the clinical course, outcomes, and prognostic factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Methods: This retrospective study involved patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure due to COPD of any cause admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) support between December 2015 and February 2020. Results: One hundred patients were evaluated. The main causes of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure were bronchitis, pneumonia, and heart failure. The patients’ mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 23.0±7.2, and their IMV rate was 43%. ICU, in-hospital, and 90-day mortality rates were 21%, 29%, and 39%, respectively. Non-survivors had more pneumonia, shock within the first 24 hours of admission, IMV, vasopressor use, and renal replacement therapy, along with higher APACHE II scores, lower admission albumin levels and PaO2/ FiO2 ratios, and longer ICU and hospital stays than survivors. Logistic regression analysis identified APACHE II score (odds ratio [OR], 1.157; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.017–1.317; P=0.026), admission PaO2/FiO2 ratio (OR, 0.989; 95% CI, 0.978–0.999; P=0.046), and vasopressor use (OR, 8.827; 95% CI, 1.650–47.215; P=0.011) as predictors of ICU mortality. APACHE II score (OR, 1.099; 95% CI, 1.021–1.182; P=0.011) and admission albumin level (OR, 0.169; 95% CI, 0.056–0.514; P=0.002) emerged as predictors of 90-day mortality. Conclusions: APACHE II scores, the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, vasopressor use, and albumin levels are significant short-term mortality predictors in severely ill COPD patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Antibiotics in COPD exacerbations requiring mechanical ventilation: a dogma to be re-evaluated
    Sebastian Osorio-Rico, Daniel Perez-Marin, John Cardeño-Sanchez
    Internal and Emergency Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Opportunities and perspectives of small molecular phosphodiesterase inhibitors in neurodegenerative diseases
    Qi Li, Qinghong Liao, Shulei Qi, He Huang, Siyu He, Weiping Lyu, Jinxin Liang, Huan Qin, Zimeng Cheng, Fan Yu, Xue Dong, Ziming Wang, Lingfei Han, Yantao Han
    European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.2024; 271: 116386.     CrossRef
  • COPD Exacerbation: Why It Is Important to Avoid ICU Admission
    Irene Prediletto, Gilda Giancotti, Stefano Nava
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(10): 3369.     CrossRef
Trauma
Association of Glasgow coma scale and endotracheal intubation in predicting mortality among patients admitted to the intensive care unit
Nader Markazi Moghaddam, Mohammad Fathi, Sanaz Zargar Balaye Jame, Mohammad Darvishi, Morteza Mortazavi
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):113-121.   Published online February 22, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00927
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
We assessed predictors of mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) and investigated if Glasgow coma scale (GCS) is associated with mortality in patients undergoing endotracheal intubation (EI). Methods: From February 2020, we performed a 1-year study on 2,055 adult patients admitted to the ICU of two teaching hospitals. The outcome was mortality during ICU stay and the predictors were patients’ demographic, clinical, and laboratory features. Results: EI was associated with a decreased risk for mortality compared with similar patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.32; P=0.030). This shows that EI had been performed correctly with proper indications. Increasing age (AOR, 1.04; P<0.001) or blood pressure (AOR, 1.01; P<0.001), respiratory problems (AOR, 3.24; P<0.001), nosocomial infection (AOR, 1.64; P=0.014), diabetes (AOR, 5.69; P<0.001), history of myocardial infarction (AOR, 2.52; P<0.001), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AOR, 3.93; P<0.001), immunosuppression (AOR, 3.15; P<0.001), and the use of anesthetics/sedatives/hypnotics for reasons other than EI (AOR, 4.60; P<0.001) were directly; and GCS (AOR, 0.84; P<0.001) was inversely related to mortality. In patients with trauma surgeries (AOR, 0.62; P=0.014) or other surgical categories (AOR, 0.61; P=0.024) undergoing EI, GCS had an inverse relation with mortality (accuracy=82.6%, area under the receiver operator characteristic curve=0.81). Conclusions: A variety of features affected the risk for mortality in patients admitted to the ICU. Considering GCS score for EI had the potential of affecting prognosis in subgroups of patients such as those with trauma surgeries or other surgical categories.
Liver
Alcohol use disorder in the intensive care unit a highly morbid condition, but chemical dependency discussion improves outcomes
Kristin Colling, Alexandra K. Kraft, Melissa L. Harry
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):122-133.   Published online January 10, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00584
  • 2,250 View
  • 86 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are common in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) and increase the risk for worse outcomes. In this study, we describe factors associated with patient mortality after ICU admission and the effect of chemical dependency (CD) counseling on outcomes in the year following ICU admission. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patient demographics, hospital data, and documentation of CD counseling by medical providers for all ICU patients with AUD admitted to our institution between January 2017 and March 2019. Primary outcomes were in-hospital and 1-year mortality. Results: Of the 527 patients with AUD requiring ICU care, median age was 56 years (range, 18–86). Both in-hospital (12%) and 1-year mortality rates (27%) were high. Rural patients, comorbidities, older age, need for mechanical ventilation, and complications were associated with increased risk of in-hospital and 1-year mortality. CD counseling was documented for 73% of patients, and 50% of these patients accepted alcohol treatment or resources prior to discharge. CD evaluation and acceptance was associated with a significantly decreased rate of readmission for liver or alcohol-related issues (36% vs. 58%; odds ratio [OR], 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27–0.61) and 1-year mortality (7% vs. 19.5%; OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.16–0.64). CD evaluation alone, regardless of patient acceptance, was associated with a significantly decreased 1-year post-discharge mortality rate (12% vs. 23%; OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.25–0.77). Conclusions: ICU patients with AUD had high in-hospital and 1-year mortality. CD evaluation, regardless of patient acceptance, was associated with a significant decrease in 1-year mortality

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Identifying excessive chronic alcohol use with phosphatidylethanol in patients with suspected severe injury-results from the IDART study
    Benedicte M Jørgenrud, Camilla C Bråthen, Jo Steinson Stenehjem, Thomas Kristiansen, Leiv Arne Rosseland, Stig Tore Bogstrand
    Alcohol and Alcoholism.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pediatrics
Characteristics and timing of mortality in children dying in pediatric intensive care: a 5-year experience
Edin Botan, Emrah Gün, Emine Kübra Şden, Cansu Yöndem, Anar Gurbanov, Burak Balaban, Fevzi Kahveci, Hasan Özen, Hacer Uçmak, Ali Genco Gençay, Tanil Kendirli
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):644-653.   Published online November 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00395
  • 2,036 View
  • 101 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), where children with critical illnesses are treated, require considerable manpower and technological infrastructure in order to keep children alive and free from sequelae. Methods: In this retrospective comparative cohort study, hospital records of patients aged 1 month to 18 years who died in the study PICU between January 2015 and December 2019 were reviewed. Results: A total of 2,781 critically ill children were admitted to the PICU. The mean±standard deviation age of 254 nonsurvivors was 64.34±69.48 months. The mean PICU length of stay was 17 days (range, 1–205 days), with 40 children dying early (<1 day of PICU admission). The majority of nonsurvivors (83.9%) had comorbid illnesses. Children with early mortality were more likely to have neurological findings (62.5%), hypotension (82.5%), oliguria (47.5%), acidosis (92.5%), coagulopathy (30.0%), and cardiac arrest (45.0%) and less likely to have terminal illnesses (52.5%) and chronic illnesses (75.6%). Children who died early had a higher mean age (81.8 months) and Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) III score (37). In children who died early, the first three signs during ICU admission were hypoglycemia in 68.5%, neurological symptoms in 43.5%, and acidosis in 78.3%. Sixty-seven patients needed continuous renal replacement therapy, 51 required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support, and 10 underwent extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusions: We found that rates of neurological findings, hypotension, oliguria, acidosis, coagulation disorder, and cardiac arrest and PRISM III scores were higher in children who died early compared to those who died later.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Descriptive and Clinical Characteristics of Nonsurvivors in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Turkey: 6 Years of Experience
    Zeynep Karakaya, Merve Boyraz, Seyma Koksal Atis, Servet Yuce, Muhterem Duyu
    Journal of Pediatric Intensive Care.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between mortality and critical events within 48 hours of transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit
    Huan Liang, Kyle A. Carey, Priti Jani, Emily R. Gilbert, Majid Afshar, L. Nelson Sanchez-Pinto, Matthew M. Churpek, Anoop Mayampurath
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Association between timing of intubation and mortality in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
Eunhye Bae, Jimyung Park, Sun Mi Choi, Jinwoo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Hong Yeul Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):561-570.   Published online October 28, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00444
  • 2,364 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Delayed intubation is associated with poor prognosis in patients with respiratory failure. However, the effect of delayed intubation in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains unknown. This study aimed to analyze whether timing of intubation after high-concentration oxygen therapy was associated with worse clinical outcomes in IPF patients. Methods: This retrospective propensity score-matched study enrolled adult patients with IPF who underwent mechanical ventilation between January 2011 and July 2021. Patients were divided into early and delayed intubation groups. Delayed intubation was defined as use of high-concentration oxygen therapy for at least 48 hours before tracheal intubation. The primary outcome was intensive care unit (ICU) mortality, and a conditional logistic regression model was used to evaluate the association between timing of intubation and clinical outcomes. Results: The median duration of high-concentration oxygen therapy before intubation was 0.5 days in the early intubation group (n=60) and 5.1 days in the delayed intubation group (n=36). The ICU mortality rate was 56.7% and 75% in the early and delayed intubation groups, respectively, before propensity matching (P=0.075). After matching for demographic and clinical covariates, 33 matched pairs were selected. In the propensity-matched cohort, delayed intubation significantly increased the risk of ICU mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 3.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–15.63; P=0.046). However, in-hospital mortality did not differ significantly between the groups. Conclusions: In patients with IPF, delayed intubation after initiation of high-concentration oxygen therapy was significantly associated with increased risk of ICU mortality compared to early intubation.
Nephrology
Impact of intradialytic hypotension on mortality following the transition from continuous renal replacement therapy to intermittent hemodialysis
Seong Geun Kim, Donghwan Yun, Jinwoo Lee, Yong Chul Kim, Dong Ki Kim, Kook-Hwan Oh, Kwon Wook Joo, Yon Su Kim, Seung Seok Han
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):86-94.   Published online October 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00948
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The transition of dialysis modalities from continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) to intermittent hemodialysis (iHD) is frequently conducted during the recovery phase of critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Herein, we addressed the occurrence of intradialytic hypotension (IDH) after this transition, and its association with the mortality risk. Methods: A total of 541 patients with acute kidney injury who attempted to transition from CRRT to iHD at Seoul National University Hospital, Korea from 2010 to 2020 were retrospectively collected. IDH was defined as a discontinuation of dialysis because of hemodynamic instability plus a nadir systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg or a decrease in systolic blood pressure ≥30 mm Hg during the first session of iHD. Odds ratios (ORs) of outcomes, such as in-hospital mortality and weaning from RRT, were measured using a logistic regression model after adjusting for multiple variables. Results: IDH occurred in 197 patients (36%), and their mortality rate (44%) was higher than that of those without IDH (19%; OR, 2.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.70–4.08). For patients exhibiting IDH, the iHD sessions delayed successful weaning from RRT (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.43–0.90) compared with sessions on those without IDH. Factors such as low blood pressure, high pulse rate, low urine output, use of mechanical ventilations and vasopressors, and hypoalbuminemia were associated with IDH risk. Conclusions: IDH occurrence following the transition from CRRT to iHD is associated with high mortality and delayed weaning from RRT.
Nutrition
Comparison of mNUTRIC-S2 and mNUTRIC scores to assess nutritional risk and predict intensive care unit mortality
So Jeong Kim, Hong Yeul Lee, Sun Mi Choi, Sang-Min Lee, Jinwoo Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):618-626.   Published online October 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00612
  • 1,879 View
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  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Nutritional status is associated with mortality. The modified Nutrition Risk in the Critically Ill (mNUTRIC) score is one of the most commonly used nutritional risk assessment tools in intensive care units (ICUs). The purpose of this study was to compare the mortality predictive ability of the mNUTRIC score to that of the mNUTRIC-S2 score, which uses the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II instead of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II. Methods: This retrospective cohort analysis included patients admitted to the ICU between January and September 2020. Each patient’s electronic medical records were reviewed. The model discrimination for predicting ICU mortality was assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a Cox regression model was performed to confirm the relationship between the groups and mortality. Results: In total, 220 patients were enrolled. The ROC curve for predicting ICU mortality was 0.64 for the mNUTRIC score versus 0.67 for the mNUTRIC-S2 score. The difference between the areas was 0.03 (95% confidence interval [CI], –0.01 to 0.06; P=0.09). Patients with mNUTRIC-S2 score ≥5 had a greater risk of ICU mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 3.64; 95% CI, 1.85–7.14; P<0.001); however, no such relationship was observed with mNUTRIC score (HR, 1.69; 95% CI, 0.62–4.62; P=0.31). Conclusions: The mNUTRIC-S2 score was significantly associated with ICU mortality. A cutoff score of 5 was selected as most appropriate.

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  • Association of malnutrition status with 30-day mortality in patients with sepsis using objective nutritional indices: a multicenter retrospective study
    Moon Seong Baek, Young Suk Kwon, Sang Soo Kang, Daechul Shim, Youngsang Yoon, Jong Ho Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2024; 39(1): 127.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care