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Volume 34 (1); February 2019
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Review Articles
Pulmonary
Pulmonary and Physical Rehabilitation in Critically Ill Patients
Myung Hun Jang, Myung-Jun Shin, Yong Beom Shin
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):1-13.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00444
  • 15,265 View
  • 992 Download
  • 30 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Some patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) because of an acute illness, complicated surgery, or multiple traumas develop muscle weakness affecting the limbs and respiratory muscles during acute care in the ICU. This condition is referred to as ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW), and can be evoked by critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP), critical illness myopathy (CIM), or critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPNM). ICUAW is diagnosed using the Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score based on bedside manual muscle testing in cooperative patients. The MRC sum score is the sum of the strengths of the 12 regions on both sides of the upper and lower limbs. ICUAW is diagnosed when the MRC score is less than 48 points. However, some patients require electrodiagnostic studies, such as a nerve conduction study, electromyography, and direct muscle stimulation, to differentiate between CIP and CIM. Pulmonary rehabilitation in the ICU can be divided into modalities intended to remove retained airway secretions and exercise therapies intended to improve respiratory function. Physical rehabilitation, including early mobilization, positioning, and limb exercises, attenuates the weakness that occurs during critical care. To perform mobilization in mechanically ventilated patients, pretreatment by removing secretions is necessary. It is also important to increase the strength of respiratory muscles and to perform lung recruitment to improve mobilization in patients who are weaned from the ventilator. For these reasons, pulmonary rehabilitation is important in addition to physical therapy. Early recognition of CIP, CIM, and CIPNM and early rehabilitation in the ICU might improve patients’ functional recovery and outcomes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Clinical impact of rehabilitation and ICU diary on critically ill patients: A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Tomohiro Ishinuki, Ling Zhang, Keisuke Harada, Hiroomi Tatsumi, Nobuaki Kokubu, Yoshika Kuno, Kanon Kumasaka, Rina Koike, Toshio Ohyanagi, Hirofumi Ohnishi, Eichi Narimatsu, Yoshiki Masuda, Toru Mizuguchi
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  • The effects of respiratory exercises on partial pressures of gases and anxiety in the acute phase of COVID-19 infection
    Vesna Grbovic, Natasa Markovic, Predrag Bogojevic, Jovana Nikolic, Jelena Milosevic, Stefan Simovic, Ivan Cekerevac, Aleksandra Jurišić-Škevin, Nebojša Zdravkovic, Sara Mijailovic, Natasa Zdravkovic
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  • Reliability and validity of the Korean version of the Functional Status Score for the ICU after translation and cross-cultural adaptation
    Jong Geol Do, Gee Young Suh, Yu Hui Won, Won Hyuk Chang, Stephanie Hiser, Dale M. Needham, Chi Ryang Chung
    Disability and Rehabilitation.2022; 44(24): 7528.     CrossRef
  • The Investigation of Pulmonary Function Changes of COVID-19 Patients in Three Months
    Lingyan Ye, Guifei Yao, Shuangxiang Lin, Yicheng Fang, Xi Chen, Liangxing Wang, Susu He, Gu Xiaoqing
    Journal of Healthcare Engineering.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Intensivecare‐relatedcognitive impairment: A biopsychosocial overview
    Jamie L. Tingey, Nickolas A. Dasher, Aaron E. Bunnell, Amy J. Starosta
    PM&R.2022; 14(2): 259.     CrossRef
  • Awakening in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation
    Su Hwan Lee
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 26.     CrossRef
  • The impact of physical medicine and rehabilitation consultation on clinical outcomes in the surgical intensive care unit
    Onuma Chaiwat, Benjaporn Sathitkarnmanee, Piyapat Dajpratham, Chayanan Thanakiattiwibun, Sunit Jarungjitaree, Suchera Rattanamung
    Medicine.2022; 101(9): e28990.     CrossRef
  • Role of Physiotherapyin Respiratory Rehabilitation and Managing COVID-19 Patients in All Stages of the Disease
    Petty Miyanda
    Journal of Preventive and Rehabilitative Medicine.2022; 4(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • The validity, reliability and feasibility of four instruments for assessing the consciousness of stroke patients in a neurological intensive care unit compared
    Xiaoxiang Yan, Lingjun Xiao, Meixin Liao, Jiajian Huang, Zhijie He, Tiebin Yan
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Functional assessment and rehabilitation protocol in acute patients affected by SARS-CoV-2 infection hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit and in the Medical Care Unit
    Susanna RICOTTI, Lucia PETRUCCI, Gabriella CARENZIO, Ettore CARLISI, Giuseppe DI NATALI, Annalisa DE SILVESTRI, Claudio LISI
    European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Therapeutic Potential of Electromyostimulation (EMS) in Critically Ill Patients—A Systematic Review
    Maryam Balke, Marc Teschler, Hendrik Schäfer, Pantea Pape, Frank C. Mooren, Boris Schmitz
    Frontiers in Physiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of Physiotherapy Interventions on Weaning in Mechanically Ventilated Critically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Lorenzo Lippi, Alessandro de Sire, Francesco D’Abrosca, Biagio Polla, Nicola Marotta, Luigi Mario Castello, Antonio Ammendolia, Claudio Molinari, Marco Invernizzi
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Expert consensus on liver transplantation perioperative evaluation and rehabilitation for acute-on-chronic liver failure
    Haijin Lv, Haiqing Zheng, Jianrong Liu, Qing Cai, Yuji Ren, Huimin Yi, Yang Yang, Xiquan Hu, Guihua Chen
    Liver Research.2022; 6(3): 121.     CrossRef
  • Case report: Personalized adapted motor activity in a COVID-19 patient complicated by critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy
    Oscar Crisafulli, Marta Baroscelli, Luca Grattarola, Giuseppe Tansini, Cristian Zampella, Giuseppe D’Antona
    Frontiers in Physiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Letter to the Editor: Comparison Between Inspiratory Muscle Training and Early Mobilization on Weaning of Mechanical Ventilation
    Rodrigo Torres-Castro, Gonzalo Rivera-Lillo, Jordi Vilaró, Homero Puppo
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.2021; 102(3): 556.     CrossRef
  • The Feasibility of High-Intensity Interval Training in Patients with Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness Syndrome Following Long-Term Invasive Ventilation
    Simon Wernhart, Jürgen Hedderich, Svenja Wunderlich, Kunigunde Schauerte, Eberhard Weihe, Dominic Dellweg, Karsten Siemon
    Sports Medicine - Open.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Could Physical Therapy Interventions Be Adopted in the Management of Critically Ill Patients with COVID-19? A Scoping Review
    Carlos Bernal-Utrera, Ernesto Anarte-Lazo, Juan Jose Gonzalez-Gerez, Elena De-La-Barrera-Aranda, Manuel Saavedra-Hernandez, Cleofas Rodriguez-Blanco
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(4): 1627.     CrossRef
  • Feasibility of subacute rehabilitation for mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 disease: a retrospective case series
    Simone Pancera, Luca N. C. Bianchi, Roberto Porta, Silvia Galeri, Maria Chiara Carrozza, Jorge H. Villafañe
    International Journal of Rehabilitation Research.2021; 44(1): 77.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Characteristics and Early Interventional Responses in Patients with Severe COVID-19 Pneumonia
    Susu He, Lina Fang, Lingzhen Xia, Shuangxiang Lin, Junhui Ye, Dinghai Luo, Kaijian Xia
    Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Step-by-step inpatient rehabilitation for critical illness after coronavirus disease 2019
    Dae-Won Gwak, Jong-Moon Hwang
    Medicine.2021; 100(23): e26317.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Physical Therapy on Regional Lung Function in Critically Ill Patients
    Christine Eimer, Katharina Freier, Norbert Weiler, Inéz Frerichs, Tobias Becher
    Frontiers in Physiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Post–Intensive Care Syndrome in Covid-19 Patients Discharged From the Intensive Care Unit
    Sevda Gardashkhani, Mehdi Ajri-Khameslou, Mehdi Heidarzadeh, SeyedMohammad Rajaei Sedigh
    Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing.2021; 23(6): 530.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Physical Therapy in the Intensive Care Unit
    Zofia Kosson, Marek Paśnicki, Marcin Kołacz
    Emergency Medical Service.2021; 8(3): 171.     CrossRef
  • Rehabilitación pulmonar en fase hospitalaria y ambulatoria
    N. Carvajal Tello, A. Segura Ordoñez, A.J. Arias Balanta
    Rehabilitación.2020; 54(3): 191.     CrossRef
  • Guidance for the management of adult patients with coronavirus disease 2019
    Jie-Ming Qu, Chen Wang, Bin Cao
    Chinese Medical Journal.2020; 133(13): 1575.     CrossRef
  • Recommendations for respiratory rehabilitation in adults with coronavirus disease 2019
    Hong-Mei Zhao, Yu-Xiao Xie, Chen Wang
    Chinese Medical Journal.2020; 133(13): 1595.     CrossRef
  • Physiotherapy Care of Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) - A Brazilian Experience
    Renato Fraga Righetti, Mirian Akemi Onoue, Flavia Vanessa Aurea Politi, Débora Trigo Teixeira, Patricia Nery de Souza, Claudia Seiko Kondo, Eliana Vieira Moderno, Igor Gutierrez Moraes, Ana Lígia Vasconcellos Maida, Laerte Pastore, Felipe Duarte Silva, Ch
    Clinics.2020; 75: e2017.     CrossRef
  • Approach to critical illness myopathy and polyneuropathy in the older SARS-CoV-2 patients
    Brendan McClafferty, Ibrahim Umer, Gary Fye, Douglas Kepko, Ricci Kalayanamitra, Zainab Shahid, Devyani Ramgobin, Alice Cai, Andrew Groff, Abani Bhandari, Chander Shekher Aggarwal, Ravi Patel, Dhirisha Bhatt, Hyma Polimera, Nitasa Sahu, Ramarao Vunnam, Re
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience.2020; 79: 241.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Pandemic: A Physiotherapy Update
    Paolo Pedersini, Jorge Hugo Villafañe, Camilo Corbellini, Marcos Roberto Tovani-Palone
    Electronic Journal of General Medicine.2020; 18(1): em264.     CrossRef
  • Muscle weakness assessment in older intensive care unit patients
    Amanda Colombo Peteck Lopes, Paulo Henrique Coltro, Vagner José Lopes, Sandra Mari Pistore Fiori, Jaqueline Santana Knapik, Tatiane Caroline Boumer
    Geriatrics, Gerontology and Aging.2020; 14(3): 166.     CrossRef
Ethics
Medical Management of Brain-Dead Organ Donors
A.S.M. Tanim Anwar, Jae-myeong Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):14-29.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00430
  • 20,232 View
  • 1,246 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
With improving healthcare services, the demand for organ transplants has been increasing daily worldwide. Deceased organ donors serve as a good alternative option to meet this demand. The first step in this process is identifying potential organ donors. Specifically, braindead patients require aggressive and intensive care from the declaration of brain death until organ retrieval. Currently, there are no specific protocols in place for this, and there are notable variations in the management strategies implemented across different transplant centers. Some transplant centers follow their own treatment protocols, whereas other countries, such as Bangladesh, do not have any protocols for potential organ donor care. In this review, we discuss how to identify brain-dead donors and describe the physiological changes that occur following brain death. We then summarize the management of brain-dead organ donors and, on the basis of a review of the literature, we propose recommendations for a treatment protocol to be developed in the future.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Deceased Organ Transplantation in Bangladesh: The Dynamics of Bioethics, Religion and Culture
    Md. Sanwar Siraj
    HEC Forum.2022; 34(2): 139.     CrossRef
  • Specialized Donor Care Facility Model and Advances in Management of Thoracic Organ Donors
    Amit Bery, Gary Marklin, Akinobu Itoh, Daniel Kreisel, Tsuyoshi Takahashi, Bryan F. Meyers, Ruben Nava, Benjamin D. Kozower, Hailey Shepherd, G. Alexander Patterson, Varun Puri
    The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.2022; 113(6): 1778.     CrossRef
  • Nursing Diagnosis for Potential Organ Donors: Accuracy Study
    Luciana Nabinger Menna Barreto, Éder Marques Cabral, Marina Raffin Buffon, Juliana Elenice Pereira Mauro, Lisiane Pruinelli, Miriam de Abreu Almeida
    Clinical Nursing Research.2022; 31(1): 60.     CrossRef
  • Proteomics, brain death, and organ transplantation
    Jamie E. Jeon, Mingyao Liu
    The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.2022; 41(3): 325.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of donor heart for transplantation
    Robert Tatum, Alexandros Briasoulis, Vakhtang Tchantchaleishvili, H. Todd Massey
    Heart Failure Reviews.2022; 27(5): 1819.     CrossRef
  • Evaluación de la Terapia de Preservación de los Donadores en Muerte Encefálica guiada por Metas Terapéuticas de donadores en el Hospital de Especialidades ''Dr. Antonio Fraga Mouret'' del Centro Médico Nacional ''La Raza''
    José Enrique Abarca-Romero, Bertha Angélica García-García, Andrea Lucía Maya-Rivera
    Revista Mexicana de Trasplantes.2022; 11(1): 20.     CrossRef
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    Amit Bery, Aadil Ali, Marcelo Cypel, Daniel Kreisel
    Thoracic Surgery Clinics.2022; 32(2): 167.     CrossRef
  • Organ donation and the medicolegal aspects: A process analysis study of the Indian States - Observational study
    Ishwarya Thyagarajan, Hemal Kanvinde, Sunil Shroff, MuneetKaur Sahi
    Indian Journal of Transplantation.2022; 16(2): 184.     CrossRef
  • Costs related to obtaining organs for transplantation: A systematic review
    Aline Moraes da Silva, Marcos Antonio Ferreira Júnior, Andréia Insabralde de Queiroz Cardoso, Maria Lucia Ivo, Jéssica Prince Fontes Almeida, Rayane Dayara Souza Melo
    Transplantation Reviews.2022; 36(4): 100724.     CrossRef
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    Matthew A. Wells, Louise E. See Hoe, Lisa C. Heather, Peter Molenaar, Jacky Y. Suen, Jason Peart, David McGiffin, John F. Fraser
    Transplantation.2021; 105(3): 496.     CrossRef
  • Hormones to the Rescue: Ameliorating Acute Lung Inflammation After Donor Brain Death
    Anna Valujskikh
    Transplantation.2021; 105(4): 697.     CrossRef
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    Fernanda Yamamoto Ricardo-da-Silva, Roberto Armstrong, Marina Vidal-dos-Santos, Cristiano de Jesus Correia, Raphael dos Santos Coutinho e Silva, Lucas Ferreira da Anunciação, Luiz Felipe Pinho Moreira, Hendrik Gerrit Derk Leuvenink, Ana Cristina Breithaup
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    International Journal of Heart Failure.2020; 2(4): 254.     CrossRef
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Original Articles
Infection
Application of Sepsis-3 Criteria to Korean Patients with Critical Illnesses
Jae Yeol Kim, Hwan Il Kim, Gee Young Suh, Sang Won Yoon, Tae-Yop Kim, Sang Haak Lee, Jae Young Moon, Jae-Young Kwon, Sungwon Na, Ho Geol Ryu, Jisook Park, Younsuck Koh
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):30-37.   Published online January 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00318
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2019;34(2):172
  • 6,204 View
  • 163 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The 2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM)/European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) task force for Sepsis-3 devised new definitions for sepsis, sepsis with organ dysfunction and septic shock. Although Sepsis-3 was data-driven, evidence-based approach, East Asian descents comprised minor portions of the project population. Methods: We selected Korean participants from the fever and antipyretics in critically ill patients evaluation (FACE) study, a joint study between Korea and Japan. We calculated the concordance rates for sepsis diagnosis between Sepsis-2 and Sepsis-3 criteria and evaluated mortality rates of sepsis, sepsis with organ dysfunction, and septic shock by Sepsis-3 criteria using the selected data. Results: Korean participants of the FACE study were 913 (383 with sepsis and 530 without sepsis by Sepsis-2 criteria). The concordance rate for sepsis diagnosis between Sepsis-2 and Sepsis-3 criteria was 55.4%. The intensive care unit (ICU) and 28-day mortality rates of sepsis, sepsis with organ dysfunction, and septic shock patients according to Sepsis-3 criteria were 26.2% and 31.0%, 27.5% and 32.5%, and 40.8% and 43.4%, respectively. The quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) was inferior not only to SOFA but also to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) for predicting ICU and 28-day mortality. Conclusions: The concordance rates for sepsis diagnosis between Sepsis-2 and Sepsis-3 criteria were low. Mortality rate for septic shock in Koreans was consistent with estimates made by the 2016 SCCM/ESICM task force. SOFA and SIRS were better than qSOFA for predicting ICU and 28-day mortality in Korean ICU patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: research priorities for the administration, epidemiology, scoring and identification of sepsis
    Mark E. Nunnally, Ricard Ferrer, Greg S. Martin, Ignacio Martin-Loeches, Flavia R. Machado, Daniel De Backer, Craig M. Coopersmith, Clifford S. Deutschman, Massimo Antonelli, Judith Hellman, Sameer Jog, Jozef Kesecioglu, Ishaq Lat, Mitchell M. Levy
    Intensive Care Medicine Experimental.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Basic science and research
Prognostic Implication of Adrenocortical Response during the Course of Critical Illness
Jin Hwa Song, Jung Hee Kim, Sang-Min Lee, Jinwoo Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):38-45.   Published online January 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00339
  • 6,014 View
  • 117 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-cortisol dissociation are hormonal conditions frequently observed in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between ACTH-cortisol dissociation and clinical outcomes of critically ill patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 94 ICU patients who underwent two rapid cosyntropin tests during hospital admission and compared the clinical aspects of patients with and without ACTH-cortisol dissociation. ACTH-cortisol dissociation was defined as plasma ACTH and serum cortisol concentrations of <22 pmol/L and >600 nmol/L, respectively. Results: Dissociation was present in 30 of the 94 patients (31.9%). Patients with ACTH-cortisol dissociation in the initial test had significantly higher hospital mortality rate than those in the control group (55% vs. 25.7%, P=0.013) There was no difference in hospital mortality between patients classified as having CIRCI and those who were not. In multivariate adjusted Cox regression analysis, the mortality risk was higher in the group with ACTH-cortisol dissociation (hazard ratio, 2.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.34 to 6.63; P=0.007). Patients with dissociation in two consecutive stimulation tests showed the highest hospital mortality rate among groups classified according to stimulation test results (100% vs. 31.3%). Conclusions: The hospital mortality was higher in ICU patients diagnosed with ACTH-cortisol dissociation. It is clinically feasible to evaluate the presence of ACTH-cortisol dissociation by analyzing rapid ACTH stimulation test results in critically ill patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Copeptin and stress-induced hyperglycemia in critically ill patients: A prospective study
    Lilian Rodrigues Henrique, Daisy Crispim, Tarsila Vieceli, Ariell Freires Schaeffer, Priscila Bellaver, Cristiane Bauermann Leitão, Tatiana Helena Rech, Antonio Palazón-Bru
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(4): e0250035.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of salivary and serum cortisol levels in mechanically ventilated patients and non-critically ill patients
    Jung Hee Kim, Yoon Ji Kim, Sang-Min Lee, Jinwoo Lee
    Acute and Critical Care.2020; 35(3): 149.     CrossRef
Ethics
Characteristics and Outcomes of Potentially Inappropriate Admissions to the Intensive Care Unit
Sooim Sin, Sang-Min Lee, Jinwoo Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):46-52.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00388
  • 4,843 View
  • 130 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Admission of patients perceived as potentially inappropriate for intensive care is a very sensitive and controversial issue. We aimed to evaluate the use of medical resources in the intensive care unit (ICU) and outcomes of patients according to a physician’s judgment of appropriateness. Methods: ICU physicians classified patients who were admitted to the medical ICU of a tertiary hospital as appropriate or inappropriate for intensive care within 24 hours of admission. Patient outcomes including mortality were analyzed according to appropriateness. Additionally, the usage and duration of mechanical ventilation (MV), renal replacement therapy (RRT), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) were analyzed according to appropriateness. Results: In total, 105 patients (male, 55.4%; mean age, 62 years) were included. Twelve (11.4%) patients were considered inappropriate for intensive care based on guidance published by the Society of Critical Care Medicine through a questionnaire survey of physicians. There was no significant difference between patients considered inappropriate or appropriate for ICU admission regarding the use and duration of MV, RRT, and ECMO. In contrast, the ICU, in-hospital, 28-day, 90-day, and total mortality rates were significantly higher among patients with inappropriate admission than among patients with appropriate admission (ICU mortality: 50.0% vs. 25.8%, P=0.008; in-hospital mortality: 58.3% vs. 43.0%, P=0.028; 28-day mortality: 58.3% vs. 33.3%, P=0.019; 90-day mortality: 66.7% vs. 44.1%, P=0.023). Conclusions: Despite higher mortality, the amount of medical resources used for patients considered potentially inappropriate for intensive care did not differ from the resources used for patients considered suitable for ICU care.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Performance and Sociodemographic Determinants of Excess Outpatient Demand of Rural Residents in China: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Yanchen Liu, Yingchun Chen, Xueyan Cheng, Yan Zhang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(16): 5963.     CrossRef
Surgery
Association of Immediate Postoperative Temperature in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit with 1-Year Mortality: Retrospective Analysis Using Digital Axillary Thermometers
Jiwook Kim, Tak Kyu Oh, Jaebong Lee, Saeyeon Kim, In-Ae Song
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):53-59.   Published online January 9, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00255
  • 4,975 View
  • 114 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Postoperative body temperature is closely associated with prognosis although there is limited research regarding this association at postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Furthermore, no studies have used digital axillary thermometers to measure postoperative body temperature. This study investigated the association between mortality and postoperative temperature measured using a digital axillary thermometer within 10 minutes after ICU admission. Methods: This retrospective observational study evaluated data from adult patients admitted to an ICU after elective or emergency surgery. The primary outcome was 1-year mortality after ICU admission. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with restricted cubic splines was used to evaluate the association between temperature and outcomes. Results: We evaluated data from 5,868 patients admitted between January 1, 2013 and May 31, 2016, including 5,311 patients (90.5%) who underwent noncardiovascular surgery and 557 patients (9.5%) who underwent cardiovascular surgery. Deviation from the median temperature (36.6°C) was associated with increases in 1-year mortality (≤ 36.6°C: linear coefficient, –0.531; P<0.001 and ≥36.6°C: spline coefficient, 0.756; P<0.001). Similar statistically significant results were observed in the noncardiovascular surgery group, but not in the cardiovascular surgery group. Conclusions: An increase or decrease in body temperature (vs. 36.6°C) measured using digital axillary thermometers within 10 minutes of postoperative ICU admission was associated with increased 1-year mortality. However, no significant association was observed after cardiovascular surgery. These results suggest that postoperative temperature is associated with longterm mortality in patients admitted to the surgical ICU in the postoperative period.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A prognostic model for 1-month mortality in the postoperative intensive care unit
    Mohammad Fathi, Nader Markazi Moghaddam, Saba Naderian Jahromi
    Surgery Today.2022; 52(5): 795.     CrossRef
  • Relationship Between First 24-h Mean Body Temperature and Clinical Outcomes of Post-cardiac Surgery Patients
    Fei Xu, Cheng Zhang, Chao Liu, Siwei Bi, Jun Gu
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Rebound hypothermia after cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) and cardiac arrest in immediate postoperative period: a report of two cases and review of literature
    Sohan Lal Solanki, Mrida A. K. Jhingan, Avanish P. Saklani
    Pleura and Peritoneum.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Postoperative Hypothermia
    Deokkyu Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(1): 79.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Protecting Postextubation Respiratory Failure and Reintubation by High-Flow Nasal Cannula Compared to Low-Flow Oxygen System: Single Center Retrospective Study and Literature Review
Minhyeok Lee, Ji Hye Kim, In Beom Jeong, Ji Woong Son, Moon Jun Na, Sun Jung Kwon
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):60-70.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00311
  • 5,830 View
  • 193 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Use of a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) reduced postextubation respiratory failure (PERF) and reintubation rate compared to use of a low-flow oxygen system (LFOS) in low-risk patients. However, no obvious conclusion was reached for high-risk patients. Here, we sought to present the current status of HFNC use as adjunctive oxygen therapy in a clinical setting and to elucidate the nature of the protective effect following extubation.
Methods
The medical records of 855 patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit of single university hospital during a period of 5.5 years were analyzed retrospectively, with only 118 patients ultimately included in the present research. The baseline characteristics of these patients and the occurrence of PERF and reintubation along with physiologic changes were analyzed.
Results
Eighty-four patients underwent HFNC, and the remaining 34 patients underwent conventional LFOS after extubation. Physicians preferred HFNC to LFOS in the face of highrisk features including old age, neurologic disease, moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a long duration of mechanical ventilation, low baseline arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen ratio, and a high baseline alveolar–arterial oxygen difference. The reintubation rate at 72 hours after extubation was not different (9.5% vs. 8.8%; P=1.000). Hypoxic respiratory failure was slightly higher in the nonreintubation group than in the reintubation group (31.9% vs. 6.7%; P=0.058). Regarding physiologic effects, heart rate was only stabilized after 24 hours of extubation in the HFNC group.
Conclusions
No difference was found in the occurrence of PERF and reintubation between both groups. It is worth noting that similar PERF and reintubation ratios were shown in the HFNC group in those with certain exacerbating risk factors versus not. Caution is needed regarding delayed reintubation in the HFNC group.

Citations

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  • Predictors and outcomes of high-flow nasal cannula failure following extubation: A multicentre observational study
    Amit Kansal, Shekhar Dhanvijay, Andrew Li, Jason Phua, Matthew Edward Cove, Wei Jun Dan Ong, Ser Hon Puah, Vicky Ng, Qiao Li Tan, Julipie Sumampong Manalansan, Michael Sharey Nocon Zamora, Michael Camba Vidanes, Juliet Tolentino Sahagun, Juvel Taculod, Ad
    Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore.2021; 50(6): 467.     CrossRef
  • Flow Field Analysis of Adult High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy
    Jingen Xia, Jiaqi Chang, Jixiang Liang, Yixuan Wang, Na Wang, Bo Xiao
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Neurosurgery
The RAP Index during Intracranial Pressure Monitoring as a Clinical Guiding for Surgically Treated Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Consecutive Series of Single Surgeon
Sung-Chul Jin, Byung Sam Choi, Jung-Soo Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):71-78.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00437
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  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
It is well known that assessing the RAP index along with intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in traumatic brain injury patients is helpful. We will discuss the usefulness of this assessment tool as a clinical guide for surgically treated poor grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).
Methods
This retrospective study included 35 patients with aneurysmal SAH who presented with World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade V SAH and received surgical treatment from January 2013 to December 2018. Emergency surgical clipping, hematoma removal, extraventricular drainage, and if needed, wide decompressive craniectomy were combined as the proper surgical treatments. Outcomes were assessed based on in-hospital survival and the Glasgow outcome scale score at 14-day follow-up. We compared the mortality rate of two groups of seven patients: ICP monitoring only (n=5) and ICP monitoring combined with the RAP index (n=2).
Results
The in-hospital 14-day mortality rate by brain lesion was 48.5% (n=17). Seven patients had real-time ICP monitoring. Before 2018, three of five patients with poor WFNS grade who received real-time ICP monitoring only died. There were no deaths in the group of two patients receiving real-time ICP monitoring and the RAP index.
Conclusions
Our data indicate that combining the RAP index and ICP monitoring can be used as markers for critical intracranial physiological parameters in poor grade WFNS patients.

Citations

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  • Multimodal Neurologic Monitoring in Children With Acute Brain Injury
    Jennifer C. Laws, Lori C. Jordan, Lindsay M. Pagano, John C. Wellons, Michael S. Wolf
    Pediatric Neurology.2022; 129: 62.     CrossRef
  • Intracranial pressure: current perspectives on physiology and monitoring
    Gregory W. J. Hawryluk, Giuseppe Citerio, Peter Hutchinson, Angelos Kolias, Geert Meyfroidt, Chiara Robba, Nino Stocchetti, Randall Chesnut
    Intensive Care Medicine.2022; 48(10): 1471.     CrossRef
  • The application value of CT radiomics features in predicting pressure amplitude correlation index in patients with severe traumatic brain injury
    Jiaqi Liu, Yingchi Shan, Guoyi Gao
    Frontiers in Neurology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Editorial
Surgery
Postoperative Hypothermia
Deokkyu Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):79-80.   Published online January 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00395
  • 35,357 View
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  • 6 Citations
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    Ayşe Gökce Işıklı, Ümmü Yıldız Fındık
    Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing.2022; 37(4): 533.     CrossRef
  • Application of Care Bundles in Postanesthesia Recovery for Elderly Patients with Colorectal Cancer
    Xiaoling Yu, Lichai Chen, Shuyi Chen, Weiming Qian, Lili Fang, Ahmed Faeq Hussein
    Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • The Effectiveness of Active External Warming of Patient Concurrently With Ice Application on the Incision Site on Post-Thoracotomy Pain and Analgesic Consumption
    Emine Kol, Serpil Ince, Abdullah Erdoğan, Bilge Karsli, Hakan Keskin, Nazmiye Özgür
    Clinical Nursing Research.2022; : 105477382211017.     CrossRef
  • Mean Temperature Loss During General Anesthesia for Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: Comparison of Males and Females
    Usama Ahmed, Hameed Ullah, Khalid Samad
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Postoperative hypothermia and associate factors at Debre Berhan comprehensive specialized hospital 2019: A cross sectional study
    Mengesha Dessie Allene
    International Journal of Surgery Open.2020; 24: 112.     CrossRef
  • Rebound hypothermia after cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) and cardiac arrest in immediate postoperative period: a report of two cases and review of literature
    Sohan Lal Solanki, Mrida A. K. Jhingan, Avanish P. Saklani
    Pleura and Peritoneum.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Reports
Gastroenterology
Pneumatosis Intestinalis Presenting as Small Bowel Obstruction without Bowel Ischemia after Mechanical Ventilation
Dong Joon Kim, Yong Joon Choi, Young Sun Yoo
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):81-85.   Published online January 17, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2016.00311
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) is a rare condition of the presence of gas within the bowel walls. PI is associated with numerous underlying diseases, ranging from life-threatening to innocuous conditions. PI is believed to be secondary to coexisting disorders in approximately 85% of all cases. This paper reviews the case of a patient who was diagnosed seven years prior with pneumoperitoneum from unknown causes without any symptoms. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for the management of aspiration pneumonia and developed extensive PI after mechanical ventilation, presenting as small bowel obstruction with mesenteric torsion. Although the exact mechanism and etiology of PI are unclear, this case provides an update on the imaging features of and the clinical conditions associated with PI, as well as the management of this condition.
Neurosurgery
Cardiac Arrest from Patient Position Change after Spine Surgery on a Jackson Table
Boohwi Hong, Seok Hwa Yoon, Soo-Yong Park, Seunghyun Song, Ann Youn, Ja Gyung Hwang
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):86-91.   Published online February 20, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2016.00794
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  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The Jackson table has minimal effects on cardiac function because it does not elevate abdominal and thoracic pressures. In addition, it decreases venous congestion and increases exposure of the surgical field. However, the hips and knees are flexed with inappropriate padding, and venostasis is promoted and increased. Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is fatal; thus immediate diagnosis and treatment are essential. However, clinical signs of intraoperative PTE are difficult to discern. Thrombolytic therapy can be considered as first-line therapy, but bleeding limits its use. The authors report a case of PTE resulting from patient positional change after spine surgery, and the use of immediate postoperative recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator.

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    Rajnish Kumar, Nishant Sahay, Shagufta Naaz, Ansarul Haq, Rajesh Kumar
    Ain-Shams Journal of Anesthesiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Differential diagnosis of intraoperative cardiac arrest after spine surgery in prone position
    DaviBrasil Khouri, MarinaAyres Delgado, JadsonLardy Lemes, MarcelaMorais Afonso Cruz
    Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia.2022; 16(4): 485.     CrossRef
  • Pulmonary thromboembolism due to venostasis induced by sitting position during clavicle and pelvic bone fracture surgery
    Soomin LEE, Boohwi HONG, Woosik HAN, Man-Shik SHIM, Yoon-Hee KIM, Seok-Hwa YOON
    Chirurgia.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Image in Critical Care
Trauma
Splenic Liquefaction after Splenic Artery Embolization
Byung Hee Kang
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):92-94.   Published online November 13, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00073
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Letter to the Editor
Thoracic Surgery
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Bridge to Lung Transplantation in a Patient with Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome and Progressive Pulmonary Fibrosis
Wooho Sim, Song Yee Kim, Jinu Han, Tyler Hyungtaek Rim, Jin Gu Lee, Hyo Chae Paik, Moo Suk Park
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):95-98.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00402
  • 4,438 View
  • 92 Download
  • 4 Citations
PDF

Citations

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  • Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome pulmonary fibrosis: a rare inherited interstitial lung disease
    Tadafumi Yokoyama, Bernadette R. Gochuico
    European Respiratory Review.2021; 30(159): 200193.     CrossRef
  • Selection Criteria for Lung Transplantation: Controversies and New Developments
    Hanne Beeckmans, Saskia Bos, Robin Vos
    Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.2021; 42(03): 329.     CrossRef
  • Hermansky–Pudlak syndrome: Mutation update
    Marjan Huizing, May C. V. Malicdan, Jennifer A. Wang, Hadass Pri‐Chen, Richard A. Hess, Roxanne Fischer, Kevin J. O'Brien, Melissa A. Merideth, William A. Gahl, Bernadette R. Gochuico
    Human Mutation.2020; 41(3): 543.     CrossRef
  • Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome-associated pneumothorax with rapid progression of respiratory failure: a case report
    Yukari Kato, Motoyasu Kato, Hiroaki Ihara, Eri Hayakawa, Kohei Shibayama, Keita Miura, Tomoko Yamada, Yoichiro Mitsuishi, Takehito Shukuya, Jun Ito, Takeshi Matsunaga, Tadashi Sato, Kenji Suzuki, Kazuhisa Takahashi
    BMC Pulmonary Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Corrigendum
Surgery
The Effect of Systematic Approach to Tracheostomy Care in Patients Transferred from the Surgical Intensive Care Unit to General Ward
Yooun-joong Jung, Younghwan Kim, Kyuhyouck Kyoung, Minae Keum, Taehyun Kim, Dae seong Ma, Suk-Kyung Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):99-99.   Published online February 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00248.e02
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2018;33(4):252
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ACC : Acute and Critical Care