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Nursing
Sleep, anxiety, depression, and stress in critically ill patients: a descriptive study in a Portuguese intensive care unit
Rui Domingues Silva, Abílio Cardoso Teixeira, José António Pinho, Pedro Marcos, José Carlos Santos
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(2):312-320.   Published online May 30, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01256
  • 354 View
  • 36 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Sleep disorders are common among patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). This study aimed to assess the perceptions of sleep quality, anxiety, depression, and stress reported by ICU patients and the relationships between these perceptions and patient variables. Methods: This cross-sectional study used consecutive non-probabilistic sampling to select participants. All patients admitted for more than 72 hours of ICU hospitalization at a Portuguese hospital between March and June 2020 were asked to complete the “Richard Campbell Sleep Questionnaire” and “Anxiety, depression, and Stress Assessment Questionnaire.” The resulting data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, Student t-tests for independent samples, and analysis of variance. The significance level for rejecting the null hypothesis was set to α ≤0.05. Results: A total of 52 patients admitted to the ICU for at least 72 hours was recruited. The mean age of the participants was 64 years (standard deviation, 14.6); 32 (61.5%) of the participants were male. Approximately 19% had psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of self-reported poor sleep was higher in women (t[50]=2,147, P=0.037) and in participants with psychiatric problems, although this difference was not statistically significant (t[50]=–0.777, P=0.441). Those who reported having sleep disorders before hospitalization had a worse perception of their sleep. Conclusions: Sleep quality perception was worse in female ICU patients, those with psychiatric disorders, and those with sleep alterations before hospitalization. Implementing early interventions and designing nonpharmacological techniques to improve sleep quality of ICU patients is essential.
CPR/Resuscitation
Effects of ketamine on the severity of depression and anxiety following postoperative mechanical ventilation: a single-blind randomized clinical trial in Iran
Seyedbabak Mojaveraghili, Fatemeh Talebi, Sima Ghorbanoghli, Shahram Moghaddam, Hamidreza Shakouri, Ruzbeh Shamsamiri, Fatemeh Mehravar
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(2):243-250.   Published online May 24, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01186
  • 490 View
  • 40 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
In this study, we compare the effects of ketamine and the combination of midazolam and morphine on the severity of depression and anxiety in mechanically ventilated patients after discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: This randomized single-blind clinical trial included 50 patients who were candidates for craniotomy and postoperative mechanical ventilation in the ICU of 5 Azar Teaching Hospital in Gorgan City, North Iran, from 2021 to 2022. Patients were allocated to two groups by quadruple block randomization. In group A, 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine was infused over 15 minutes after craniotomy and then continued at a dose of 5 µ/kg/min during mechanical ventilation. In group B, midazolam was infused at a dose of 2–3 mg/hr and morphine at a dose of 3–5 mg/hr. After patients were discharged from the ICU, if their Glasgow Coma Scale scores were ≥14, Beck’s anxiety and depression inventories were completed by a psychologist within 2 weeks, 2 months, and 6 months after discharge. Results: The mean scores of depression at 2 months (P=0.01) and 6 months (P=0.03) after discharge were significantly lower in the ketamine group than in the midazolam and morphine group. The mean anxiety scores were significantly lower in the ketamine group 2 weeks (P=0.006) and 6 months (P=0.002) after discharge. Conclusions: Ketamine is an effective drug for preventing and treating anxiety and depression over the long term in patients discharged from the ICU. However, further larger volume studies are required to validate these results.
Pulmonary
Cinematic virtual reality for anxiety management in mechanically ventilated patients: a feasibility and pilot study
Alexander C. Haley, David A. Wacker
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(2):230-236.   Published online February 4, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00843
  • 4,524 View
  • 213 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Mechanically ventilated patients experience anxiety for many reasons. Pharmacological treatments such as benzodiazepines are commonly employed to manage anxiety; however, these therapies often cause undesired side effects. Additional therapies for anxiety management are needed. We sought to determine whether cell phone-based virtual reality therapy could feasibly be used for anxiety management in mechanically ventilated patients.
Methods
Mechanically ventilated subjects underwent at least one session of virtual reality therapy in which they were shown a cinematic video of an outdoor green space or blue space with 360° visual range of motion. Goal session duration was 5 minutes. The primary outcome was incidence of predefined patient safety events, including self-extubation and accidental removal of tubes or lines.
Results
Ten subjects underwent a total of 18 virtual reality sessions. Fifteen sessions lasted the planned 5 minutes, one session was extended at participant request, and two sessions were terminated early at participant request. There were no occurrences of the predefined safety events, and no occurrences of cybersickness. Use of a visual analog scale to measure anxiety level was feasible for this pilot study, demonstrating feasibility of this scale for future, larger scale studies.
Conclusions
Virtual reality therapy shows potential as a means of managing anxiety in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation, and further rigorous exploration with this protocol is feasible.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Opportunities for Managing Pain and Anxiety in the Intensive Care Unit Using Virtual Reality: Perspectives from Bedside Care Providers
    Isabella P. Garito, Samantha Lewis-Fung, Brenna Lawson, Hannah Gabrielle Gray, Christopher Smith, Lora Appel
    Journal of Medical Extended Reality.2024; 1(1): 53.     CrossRef
  • Virtual Reality Therapy for People With Epilepsy and Related Anxiety: Protocol for a 3-Phase Pilot Clinical Trial
    Hannah Gabrielle Gray, Danielle Tchao, Samantha Lewis-Fung, Susanna Pardini, Laurence R Harris, Lora Appel
    JMIR Research Protocols.2023; 12: e41523.     CrossRef
  • Virtual and augmented reality in intensive care medicine: a systematic review
    Dominika Kanschik, Raphael Romano Bruno, Georg Wolff, Malte Kelm, Christian Jung
    Annals of Intensive Care.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A study to assess the communication and level of anxiety among mechanically ventilated conscious patients in intensive care units of sree mookambika medical college hospital at kanyakumari district
    Derlin A. Ahisha, Retnam C. Ajitha
    i-manager's Journal on Nursing.2023; 13(2): 20.     CrossRef
Nursing
Intensive care unit professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain: social and work-related variables, COVID-19 symptoms, worries, and generalized anxiety levels
Fernando J. García-Hedrera, Fernanda Gil-Almagro, F. Javier Carmona-Monge, Cecilia Peñacoba-Puente, Patricia Catalá-Mesón, Lilian Velasco-Furlong
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):232-241.   Published online August 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00213
  • 5,087 View
  • 104 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 outbreak has been identified as a pandemic and global health emergency. It presents as a severe acute respiratory disease. The rapid dissemination of the disease created challenges for healthcare systems and forced healthcare workers (HCWs) to deal with many clinical and nonclinical stresses. The aim of our research is to describe work conditions, symptoms experienced by HCWs, worries about contagion, and generalized anxiety symptoms and compare those findings across regions in Spain. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using an online survey. Critical care units throughout Spain were included. The sample comprised HCWs working in intensive care units from March to May 2020. We assessed work variables, physical symptoms, worries about contagion, and anxiety (generalized anxiety disorder-7 questionnaire). Results: The final sample comprised 448 surveys. Among the respondents, 86.9% (n=389) were nursing professionals, and 84.8% (n=380) were women. All participants cared for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients during the study period. Workload during the pandemic in Madrid was judged to be higher than in other regions (P<0.01). The availability of personal protective equipment was found to be higher in Cataluña. The most frequently experienced symptom was headaches (78.1%). Worries about self-infection and the possibility of infecting others received mean scores of 3.11 and 3.75, respectively. Mean scores for generalized anxiety levels were 11.02, with 58.7% of the professionals presenting with generalized anxiety syndrome during the assessment. Conclusions: In this study, we found high levels of anxiety among HCWs caring directly for COVID-19 patients, which could produce long-term psychological alterations that still need to be assessed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The effects of fear of COVID-19 among Spanish healthcare professionals in three years after the pandemic onset via validation of the FCV-19S: a prospective study
    Cecilia Peñacoba-Puente, Octavio Luque-Reca, Mark D. Griffiths, Fernando J. García-Hedrera, F. Javier Carmona-Monge, Fernanda Gil-Almagro
    Current Psychology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • From Anxiety to Hardiness: The Role of Self-Efficacy in Spanish CCU Nurses in the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Fernanda Gil-Almagro, Fernando José García-Hedrera, Francisco Javier Carmona-Monge, Cecilia Peñacoba-Puente
    Medicina.2024; 60(2): 215.     CrossRef
  • Cognitive appraisals and coping strategies of registered nurses in the emergency department combating COVID‐19: A scoping review
    Chia‐Hung Lin, Shu‐Fen Siao, You‐Jie Lin, Pin‐Hsien Hsin, Mack Shelley, Yen‐Han Lee
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship.2023; 55(1): 79.     CrossRef
  • The impact of pandemics on healthcare providers' workloads: A scoping review
    Gemma Doleman, Annemarie De Leo, Dianne Bloxsome
    Journal of Advanced Nursing.2023; 79(12): 4434.     CrossRef
  • Critical care medicine training in the age of COVID-19
    Walter Mickey
    Journal of Osteopathic Medicine.2023; 123(9): 427.     CrossRef
  • Psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Spanish healthcare workers: a systematic review of prevalence and wave-based patterns
    Irene Jaén, Carolina Ausín, Diana Castilla
    Current Psychology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on intensive care unit workers: a nationwide survey
    Sangeeta Mehta, Christopher Yarnell, Sumesh Shah, Peter Dodek, Jeanna Parsons-Leigh, Robert Maunder, Jessica Kayitesi, Catherine Eta-Ndu, Fran Priestap, Danielle LeBlanc, Jennifer Chen, Kimia Honarmand
    Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésie.2022; 69(4): 472.     CrossRef
Neurology
The Effects of a Delirium Notification Program on the Clinical Outcomes of the Intensive Care Unit: A Preliminary Pilot Study
Jaesub Park, Seung-Taek Oh, Sunyoung Park, Won-Jung Choi, Cheung Soo Shin, Se Hee Na, Jae-Jin Kim, Jooyoung Oh, Jin Young Park
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(1):23-33.   Published online February 6, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2017.00584
  • 9,468 View
  • 185 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Delirium is common among intensive care unit (ICU) patients, so recent clinical guidelines recommended routine delirium monitoring in the ICU. But, its effect on the patient’s clinical outcome is still controversial. In particular, the effect of systems that inform the primary physician of the results of monitoring is largely unknown.
Methods
The delirium notification program using bedside signs and electronic chart notifications was applied to the pre-existing delirium monitoring protocol. Every patient was routinely evaluated for delirium, pain, and anxiety using validated tools. Clinical outcomes, including duration of delirium, ICU stay, and mortality were reviewed and compared for 3 months before and after the program implementation.
Results
There was no significant difference between the two periods of delirium, ICU stay, and mortality. However, anxiety, an important prognostic factor in the ICU survivor’s mental health, was significantly reduced and pain tended to decrease.
Conclusions
Increasing the physician’s awareness of the patient’s mental state by using a notification program could reduce the anxiety of ICU patients even though it may not reduce delirium. The results suggested that the method of delivering the results of monitoring was also an important factor in the success of the delirium monitoring program.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Adaptation and Validation of a Chart‐Based Delirium Detection Tool for the ICU (CHART‐DEL‐ICU)
    Karla D. Krewulak, Carmen Hiploylee, E. W. Ely, Henry T. Stelfox, Sharon K. Inouye, Kirsten M. Fiest
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.2021; 69(4): 1027.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care