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33 "Min Kim"
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Original Article
Surgery
Biomarkers to predict mortality in patients with Fournier’s gangrene admitted to the intensive care unit after surgery in South Korea
In Sik Shin, Seong Chan Gong, Sanghyun An, Kwangmin Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(4):452-459.   Published online November 21, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00766
  • 1,306 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The use of biomarkers to predict patient outcomes may be crucial for patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) following surgery because biomarkers guide clinicians in tailoring treatment plans accordingly. Therefore, we aimed to identify potential biomarkers to predict the prognosis of patients with Fournier’s gangrene (FG) admitted to the ICU after surgery.
Methods
We enrolled patients with FG admitted to our Hospital between January 2013 and December 2022. We retrospectively analyzed patient characteristics, factors related to management, scores known to be associated with the prognosis of FG, and laboratory data.
Results
The study population included 28 survivors and 13 nonsurvivors. The initial serum lactate level taken in the emergency department; white blood cell, neutrophil, and platelet counts; delta neutrophil index and international normalized ratio; albumin, glucose, HCO3, and postoperative lactate levels; and the laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis differed between survivors and nonsurvivors. Postoperative lactate and initial albumin levels were independent predictors of mortality in patients with FG. In the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the postoperative lactate level was the best indicator of mortality (area under the curve, 0.877; 95% confidence interval, 0.711–1.000). The optimal cutoff postoperative lactate level for predicting mortality was 3.0 mmol/L (sensitivity, 80.0%; specificity, 95.0%).
Conclusions
Postoperative lactate and initial albumin levels could be potential predictors of mortality in patients with FG admitted to the ICU after surgery, and the optimal cutoff postoperative lactate and initial albumin levels to predict mortality were 3.0 mmol/L and 3.05 g/dl, respectively. Large-scale multicenter prospective studies are required to confirm our results.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Risk Factors for Mortality Among Patients With Fournier Gangrene: A Systematic Review
    Pavan Shet, Ashmit Daiyan Mustafa, Karan Varshney, Lavina Rao, Sameen Sawdagar, Florence McLennan, Siraaj Ansari, Darshan Shet, Niveshan Sivathamboo, Sian Campbell
    Surgical Infections.2024; 25(4): 261.     CrossRef
Letter to the Editor
Thoracic Surgery
Reply to comment on “Risk factors for intensive care unit readmission after lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study”
Hye-Bin Kim, Sungwon Na, Hyo Chae Paik, Hyeji Joo, Jeongmin Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):236-237.   Published online May 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00556
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Erratum
Surgery
Erratum to "Adjuvant intravenous immunoglobulin administration on postoperative critically ill patients with secondary peritonitis: a retrospective study"
Young Un Choi, Jun Gi Kim, Ji Young Jang, Tae Hwa Go, Kwangmin Kim, Keum Seok Bae, Hongjin Shim
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):250-250.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01515.e1
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2023;38(1):21
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Original Article
Surgery
Adjuvant intravenous immunoglobulin administration on postoperative critically ill patients with secondary peritonitis: a retrospective study
Young Un Choi, Jun Gi Kim, Ji Young Jang, Tae Hwa Go, Kwangmin Kim, Keum Seok Bae, Hongjin Shim
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):21-30.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01515
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2023;38(2):250
  • 2,460 View
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  • 1 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The use of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in sepsis patients from bowel perforation is still debatable. However, few studies have evaluated the effect of IVIG as an adjuvant therapy after source control. This study aimed to analyze the effect of IVIG in critically ill patients who underwent surgery due to secondary peritonitis.
Methods
In total, 646 medical records of surgical patients who were treated for secondary peritonitis were retrospectively analyzed. IVIG use, initial clinical data, and changes in Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score over the 7-day admission in the intensive care unit for sepsis check, base excess, and delta neutrophil index (DNI) were analyzed. Mortalities and periodic profiles were assessed. Propensity scoring matching as comparative analysis was performed in the IVIG group and non-IVIG group.
Results
General characteristics were not different between the two groups. The survival curve did not show a significantly reduced mortality in the IVIG. Moreover, the IVIG group did not have a lower risk ratio for mortality than the non-IVIG group. However, when the DNI were compared during the first 7 days, the reduction rate in the IVIG group was statistically faster than in the non-IVIG group (P<0.01).
Conclusions
The use of IVIG was significantly associated with faster decrease in DNI which means faster reduction of inflammation. Since the immune system is rapidly activated, the additional use of IVIG after source control surgery in abdominal sepsis patients, especially those with immunocompromised patients can be considered. However, furthermore clinical studies are needed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • USING INTRAVENOUS IMMUNOGLOBULIN IN A PATIENT WITH SEPTIC SHOCK AND MULTIPLE COMORBIDITIES: A REVIEW BASED ON A CLINICAL CASE
    Nataliya Matolynets, Jacek Rolinski, Khrystyna Lishchuk-Yakymovych, Yaroslav Tolstyak
    Proceeding of the Shevchenko Scientific Society. Medical Sciences.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Report
Cardiology
Successful extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy-associated pheochromocytoma: a case report
Sangshin Park, Min Kim, Dae In Lee, Ju-Hee Lee, Sangmin Kim, Sang Yeub Lee, Jang-Whan Bae, Kyung-Kuk Hwang, Dong-Woon Kim, Myeong-Chan Cho, Dae-Hwan Bae
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):194-198.   Published online May 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01158
  • 3,450 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
The main mechanism of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is catecholamine-induced acute myocardial stunning. Pheochromocytoma, a catecholamine-secreting tumor, can cause several cardiovascular complications, including hypertensive crisis, myocardial infarction, toxic myocarditis, and TCM. A 29-year-old woman presented to our hospital with general weakness, vomiting, dyspnea, and chest pain. The patient was nullipara, 28 weeks’ gestation, and had a cachexic morphology. Her cardiac enzyme levels were elevated and bedside echocardiography showed apical akinesia, suggesting TCM. The next day, she could not feel the fetal movement, and an emergency cesarean section was performed. After delivery, the patient experienced cardiac arrest and was transferred to the intensive care unit for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Spontaneous circulation returned after 28 minutes of CPR, but cardiogenic shock continued, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was initiated. On the third day of ECMO maintenance, left ventricular ejection fraction improved and blood pressure stabilized. On the eighth day after ECMO insertion, it was removed. However, complications of the left leg vessels occurred, and several surgeries and interventions were performed. A left adrenal gland mass was found on computed tomography and was removed while repairing the leg vessels. Pheochromocytoma was diagnosed and left adrenalectomy was performed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Mechanical Circulatory Support Strategies in Takotsubo Syndrome with Cardiogenic Shock: A Systematic Review
    Johanna K. R. von Mackensen, Vanessa I. T. Zwaans, Ahmed El Shazly, Karel M. Van Praet, Roland Heck, Christoph T. Starck, Felix Schoenrath, Evgenij V. Potapov, Joerg Kempfert, Stephan Jacobs, Volkmar Falk, Leonhard Wert
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(2): 473.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Trauma
Determination of risk factors associated with surgical site infection in patients undergoing preperitoneal pelvic packing for unstable pelvic fracture
Kang Min Kim, Myoung Jun Kim, Jae Sik Chung, Ji Wool Ko, Young Un Choi, Hongjin Shim, Ji Young Jang, Keum Seok Bae, Kwangmin Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(2):247-255.   Published online April 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01396
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Several recent studies have shown that preperitoneal pelvic packing (PPP) effectively produces hemostasis in patients with unstable pelvic fractures. However, few studies have examined the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) in patients undergoing PPP following an unstable pelvic fracture. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate factors associated with SSI in such patients.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 188 patients who developed hemorrhagic shock due to pelvic fracture between April 2012 and May 2021. Forty-four patients were enrolled in this study.
Results
SSI occurred in 15 of 44 patients (34.1%). The SSIs occurred more frequently in cases of repacking during the second-look surgery (0 vs. 4 [26.7%], P=0.010) and combined bladder-urethra injury (1 [3.4%] vs. 4 [26.7%], P=0.039). The incidence of SSIs was not significantly different between patients undergoing depacking within or after 48 hours (12 [41.4%] vs. 5 [33.3%], P=0.603). The mean time to diagnosis of SSI was 8.1±3.9 days from PPP. The most isolated organism was Staphylococcus epidermidis.
Conclusions
Repacking and combined bladder-urethra injury are potential risk factors for SSI in patients with unstable pelvic fracture. Close observation is recommended for up to 8 days in patients with these risk factors. Further, 48 hours after PPP, removing the packed gauze on cessation of bleeding and not performing repacking can help prevent SSI. Additional analyses are necessary with a larger number of patients with the potential risk factors identified in this study.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Angioembolization Has Similar Efficacy and Lower Total Charges than Preperitoneal Pelvic Packing in Patients With Pelvic Ring or Acetabulum Fractures
    Aaron Singh, Travis Kotzur, Ezekial Koslosky, Rishi Gonuguntla, Lorenzo Canseco, David Momtaz, Ali Seifi, Case Martin
    Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma.2024; 38(5): 254.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated With Pelvic Infection After Pre-Peritoneal Pelvic Packing for Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Fractures
    Jennifer E. Baker, Husayn A. Ladhani, Caitlyn McCall, Chelsea R. Horwood, Nicole L. Werner, Barry Platnick, Clay Cothren Burlew
    Surgical Infections.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current Management of Hemodynamically Unstable Patients with Pelvic Fracture
    Kevin Harrell, Chelsea Horwood, Clay Cothren Burlew
    Current Surgery Reports.2023; 11(4): 92.     CrossRef
  • Open Fixation After Preperitoneal Pelvic Packing Is Associated With a High Surgical Site Infection Rate
    Ye Joon Kim, Bryan L. Scott, Fredric M. Pieracci, Ernest E. Moore, Cyril Mauffrey, Joshua A. Parry
    Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma.2023; 37(11): 547.     CrossRef
  • Extraperitoneal pelvic packing in trauma – a review
    Sajad Ahmad Salati
    Polish Journal of Surgery.2022; 95(3): 46.     CrossRef
Surgery
Risk factors for intensive care unit readmission after lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study
Hye-Bin Kim, Sungwon Na, Hyo Chae Paik, Hyeji Joo, Jeongmin Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(2):99-108.   Published online April 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.01144
  • 5,083 View
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  • 6 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Lung transplantation (LT) is an accepted therapeutic modality for end-stage lung disease patients. Intensive care unit (ICU) readmission is a risk factor for mortality after LT, for which consistent risk factors have not been elucidated. Thus, we investigated the risk factors for ICU readmission during index hospitalization after LT, particularly regarding the posttransplant condition of LT patients.
Methods
In this retrospective study, we investigated all adult patients undergoing LT between October 2012 and August 2017 at our institution. We collected perioperative data from electronic medical records such as demographics, comorbidities, laboratory findings, ICU readmission, and in-hospital mortality.
Results
We analyzed data for 130 patients. Thirty-two patients (24.6%) were readmitted to the ICU 47 times during index hospitalization. At the initial ICU discharge, the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (odds ratio [OR], 1.464; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.083−1.978; P=0.013) and pH (OR, 0.884; 95% CI, 0.813−0.962; P=0.004; when the pH value increases by 0.01) were related to ICU readmission using multivariable regression analysis and were still significant after adjusting for confounding factors. Thirteen patients (10%) died during the hospitalization period, and the number of ICU readmissions was a significant risk factor for in-hospital mortality. The most common causes of ICU readmission and in-hospital mortality were infection-related.
Conclusions
The SOFA score and pH were associated with increased risk of ICU readmission. Early postoperative management of these factors and thorough posttransplantation infection control can reduce ICU readmission and improve the prognosis of LT patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The association of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at intensive care unit discharge with intensive care unit readmission in the cardiac intensive care unit
    Yonghoon Shin, Ji Hoon Jang, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Soo Jin Na, Chi Ryang Chung, Ki Hong Choi, Taek Kyu Park, Joo Myung Lee, Jeong Hoon Yang
    European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care.2024; 13(4): 354.     CrossRef
  • Cardiothoracic Transplant Anesthesia: Selected Highlights: Part I—Lung Transplantation
    Andrew M. Courtwright, Jagan Devarajan, Ashley Virginia Fritz, Archer Kilbourne Martin, Barbara Wilkey, Sudhakar Subramani, Christopher M. Cassara, Justin N. Tawil, Andrea N. Miltiades, Michael L. Boisen, Brandi A. Bottiger, Angela Pollak, Theresa A. Gelz
    Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia.2023; 37(6): 884.     CrossRef
  • Status and Risk Factors in Patients Requiring Unplanned Intensive Care Unit Readmission Within 48 Hours: A Retrospective Propensity-Matched Study in China
    Yan-Ling Yin, Mei-Rong Sun, Kun Zhang, Yu-Hong Chen, Jie Zhang, Shao-Kun Zhang, Li-Li Zhou, Yan-Shuo Wu, Peng Gao, Kang-Kang Shen, Zhen-Jie Hu
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2023; Volume 16: 383.     CrossRef
  • Comment on “Risk factors for intensive care unit readmission after lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study”
    Maida Qazi, Mahnoor Amin
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(2): 234.     CrossRef
  • Reply to comment on “Risk factors for intensive care unit readmission after lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study”
    Hye-Bin Kim, Sungwon Na, Hyo Chae Paik, Hyeji Joo, Jeongmin Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(2): 236.     CrossRef
  • Predicting outcomes, describing complications and optimising rehabilitation in patients undergoing lung transplantation
    Massimiliano Polastri, Gian Maria Paganelli
    International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation.2023; 30(10): 1.     CrossRef
Pharmacology
Inhalation sedation for postoperative patients in the intensive care unit: initial sevoflurane concentration and comparison of opioid use with propofol sedation
Seungho Jung, Sungwon Na, Hye Bin Kim, Hye Ji Joo, Jeongmin Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(3):197-204.   Published online August 10, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00213
  • 4,851 View
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  • 4 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Although the use of volatile sedatives in the intensive care unit (ICU) is increasing in Europe, it remains infrequent in Asia. Therefore, there are no clinical guidelines available. This study investigates the proper initial concentration of sevoflurane, a volatile sedative that induces a Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS) score of –2 to –3, in patients who underwent head and neck surgery with tracheostomy. We also compared the amount of postoperative opioid consumption between volatile and intravenous (IV) sedation.
Methods
We planned a prospective study to determine the proper initial sevoflurane concentration and a retrospective analysis to compare postoperative opioid consumption between volatile sedation and propofol sedation. Patients scheduled for head and neck surgery with tracheostomy and subsequent postoperative sedation in the ICU were enrolled.
Results
In this prospective study, the effective dose 50 (ED50) of initial end-tidal sevoflurane concentration was 0.36% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20 to 0.60%), while the ED 95 was 0.69% (95% CI, 0.60 to 0.75%) based on isotonic regression methods. In this retrospective study, remifentanil consumption during postoperative sedation was significantly lower in the sevoflurane group (2.52±1.00 µg/kg/hr, P=0.001) than it was in the IV propofol group (3.66±1.30 µg/kg/hr).
Conclusions
We determined the proper initial end-tidal concentration setting of sevoflurane for patients with tracheostomy who underwent head and neck surgery. Postoperative sedation with sevoflurane appears to be a valid and safe alternative to IV sedation with propofol.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Halogenated anesthetics vs intravenous hypnotics for short and long term sedation in the intensive care unit: A meta-analysis
    V. Likhvantsev, G. Landoni, N. Ermokhina, M. Yadgarov, L. Berikashvili, K. Kadantseva, O. Grebenchikov, L. Okhinko, A. Kuzovlev
    Medicina Intensiva.2023; 47(5): 267.     CrossRef
  • Halogenated anesthetics vs intravenous hypnotics for short and long term sedation in the intensive care unit: A meta-analysis
    V. Likhvantsev, G. Landoni, N. Ermokhina, M. Yadgarov, L. Berikashvili, K. Kadantseva, O. Grebenchikov, L. Okhinko, A. Kuzovlev
    Medicina Intensiva (English Edition).2023; 47(5): 267.     CrossRef
  • Inhaled Sedation with Volatile Anesthetics for Mechanically Ventilated Patients in Intensive Care Units: A Narrative Review
    Khaled Ahmed Yassen, Matthieu Jabaudon, Hussah Abdullah Alsultan, Haya Almousa, Dur I Shahwar, Fatimah Yousef Alhejji, Zainab Yaseen Aljaziri
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(3): 1069.     CrossRef
  • Sedation with Sevoflurane versus Propofol in COVID-19 Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Results from a Randomized Clinical Trial
    Sara Martínez-Castro, Berta Monleón, Jaume Puig, Carolina Ferrer Gomez, Marta Quesada, David Pestaña, Alberto Balvis, Emilio Maseda, Alejandro Suárez de la Rica, Ana Monero Feijoo, Rafael Badenes
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2023; 13(6): 925.     CrossRef
  • Effect of inhaled anaesthetics on cognitive and psychiatric outcomes in critically ill adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Sean Cuninghame, Angela Jerath, Kevin Gorsky, Asaanth Sivajohan, Conall Francoeur, Davinia Withington, Lisa Burry, Brian H. Cuthbertson, Beverley A. Orser, Claudio Martin, Adrian M. Owen, Marat Slessarev, Martin Chapman, Damon Scales, Julie Nardi, Beth Li
    British Journal of Anaesthesia.2023; 131(2): 314.     CrossRef
  • Experiencia y revisión de la literatura del uso del dispositivo Anesthetic Conserving Device (AnaConDa) durante la pandemia en pacientes con neumonía por COVID-19 en un hospital público
    María Guadalupe Morales Hernández, Marcelo Díaz Conde, Ixchel Magaña Matienzo
    Medicina Crítica.2023; 37(4): 334.     CrossRef
  • Sedation of patients in intensive care units. Guidelines
    V.I. Potievskaya, I.B. Zabolotskikh, I.E. Gridchik, A.I. Gritsan, A.A. Eremenko, I.A. Kozlov, A.L. Levit, V.A. Mazurok, I.V. Molchanov
    Anesteziologiya i reanimatologiya.2023; (5): 6.     CrossRef
  • Inhaled volatile anesthetics in the intensive care unit
    Erin D Wieruszewski, Mariam ElSaban, Patrick M Wieruszewski, Nathan J Smischney
    World Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prospects of inhalation sedation in intensive care
    O.A. Grebenchikov, V.V. Kulabukhov, A.K. Shabanov, O.V. Ignatenko, V.V. Antonova, R.A. Cherpakov, I.V. Redkin, E.A. Boeva, A.N. Kuzovlev
    Anesteziologiya i reanimatologiya.2022; (3): 84.     CrossRef
  • Análisis nacional de la sedación aplicada en pacientes de cuidados críticos
    Grace Pamela López Pérez, Melani Dayana Carrera Casa, Gissela Lizbeth Amancha Moyulema, Yadira Nathaly Chicaiza Quilligana, Ana Belén Guamán Tacuri, Joselyn Mireya Iza Arias
    Salud, Ciencia y Tecnología.2022; 2(S1): 234.     CrossRef
Review Article
Basic science and research
Two-photon intravital imaging of leukocyte migration during inflammation in the respiratory system
Young Min Kim, Soi Jeong, Young Ho Choe, Young-Min Hyun
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(2):101-107.   Published online May 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00542
  • 8,978 View
  • 185 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Two-photon intravital imaging is a powerful method by which researchers are able to directly observe biological phenomena in live organisms. Researchers in various biomedical research fields have applied two-photon imaging to a variety of target organs by utilizing this technology’s ability to penetrate to significant depths with minimal phototoxicity. The mouse respiratory system in inflammation models is a good example, as two-photon intravital imaging can provide insights as to how the immune system is activated in response to inflammation within the respiratory system. Inflammation models can be generated via influenza viral, bacterial, or lipopolysaccharide injection. To exteriorize the lungs or trachea, thoracotomy or tracheotomy is performed, respectively; the appropriate combination of inflammation induction and organ exposure is selected depending on the study purpose. On the other hand, visualizing the movement of leukocytes is also an important component; to this end, immune cell populations of interest are either labeled via the genetic attachment of fluorescent proteins or stained with antibodies or dyes. With the proper selection of methods at each step, twophoton intravital imaging can yield visual evidence regarding immune responses to inflammation.

Citations

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  • Live-Cell Imaging Quantifies Changes in Function and Metabolic NADH Autofluorescence During Macrophage-Mediated Phagocytosis of Tumor Cells
    Shelby N. Bess, Matthew J. Igoe, Timothy J. Muldoon
    Immunological Investigations.2024; 53(2): 210.     CrossRef
  • Integration of immune cells in organs-on-chips: a tutorial
    Lisette Van Os, Britta Engelhardt, Olivier T. Guenat
    Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Intravital Imaging of Pulmonary Immune Response in Inflammation and Infection
    Nazli Alizadeh-Tabrizi, Stefan Hall, Christian Lehmann
    Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Probe-based intravital microscopy: filling the gap between in vivo imaging and tissue sample microscopy in basic research and clinical applications
    Katrien Van Dyck, Eliane Vanhoffelen, Jonas Yserbyt, Patrick Van Dijck, Marco Erreni, Sophie Hernot, Greetje Vande Velde
    Journal of Physics: Photonics.2021; 3(3): 032003.     CrossRef
Case Report
Pulmonary
Lung injury associated with inhalation of effective microorganism blends
Jee-min Kim, Yoon Jin Kwak, Ho Il Yoon
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(2):122-126.   Published online April 8, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00332
  • 10,071 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Since 2009, effective microorganisms (EMs) have been supplied by the local government to the citizens of Seongnam, Korea, for various environment-protective uses including manufacturing detergents, cosmetics and humidifier disinfectants. A 68-year-old man who had placed an EM blends into a humidifier for inhalation visited the emergency room with complaints of fever and dyspnea. He was in a shock state with hypoxia. Chest computed tomography revealed diffuse ground-glass opacities that were dominant in the bilateral upper lobes. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial lung biopsy was performed. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis and biopsy findings were consistent with alveolar hemorrhage. All microbiological and virological test results were negative. His symptoms and radiographic opacities had improved markedly after several days of conservative care, and he was discharged healthy after 1 week of hospital stay.
Review Articles
Pulmonary
Critical Care before Lung Transplantation
Jin Gu Lee, Moo Suk Park, Su Jin Jeong, Song Yee Kim, Sungwon Na, Jeongmin Kim, Hyo Chae Paik
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(4):197-205.   Published online November 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00367
  • 8,163 View
  • 253 Download
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  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Lung transplantation is widely accepted as the only viable treatment option for patients with end-stage lung disease. However, the imbalance between the number of suitable donor lungs available and the number of possible candidates often results in intensive care unit (ICU) admission for the latter. In the ICU setting, critical care is essential to keep these patients alive and to successfully bridge to lung transplantation. Proper management in the ICU is also one of the key factors supporting long-term success following transplantation. Critical care includes the provision of respiratory support such as mechanical ventilation (MV) and extracorporeal life support (ECLS). Accordingly, a working knowledge of the common critical care issues related to these unique patients and the early recognition and management of problems that arise before and after transplantation in the ICU setting are crucial for long-term success. In this review, we discuss the management and selection of candidates for lung transplantation as well as existing respiratory support strategies that involve MV and ECLS in the ICU setting.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Optimizing the prelung transplant candidate
    John Pagteilan, Scott Atay
    Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation.2024; 29(1): 37.     CrossRef
  • Awakening in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation
    Su Hwan Lee
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 26.     CrossRef
  • Recipient Management before Lung Transplantation
    Hyoung Soo Kim, Sunghoon Park
    Journal of Chest Surgery.2022; 55(4): 265.     CrossRef
  • Outcomes of Patients on the Lung Transplantation Waitlist in Korea: A Korean Network for Organ Sharing Data Analysis
    Hye Ju Yeo, Dong Kyu Oh, Woo Sik Yu, Sun Mi Choi, Kyeongman Jeon, Mihyang Ha, Jin Gu Lee, Woo Hyun Cho, Young Tae Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long- and short-term clinical impact of awake extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as bridging therapy for lung transplantation
    Nam Eun Kim, Ala Woo, Song Yee Kim, Ah Young Leem, Youngmok Park, Se Hyun Kwak, Seung Hyun Yong, Kyungsoo Chung, Moo Suk Park, Young Sam Kim, Ha Eun Kim, Jin Gu Lee, Hyo Chae Paik, Su Hwan Lee
    Respiratory Research.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Critical Care after Lung Transplantation
Song Yee Kim, Su Jin Jeong, Jin Gu Lee, Moo Suk Park, Hyo Chae Paik, Sungwon Na, Jeongmin Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(4):206-215.   Published online November 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00360
  • 16,843 View
  • 653 Download
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  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Since the first successful lung transplantation in 1983, there have been many advances in the field. Nevertheless, the latest data from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation revealed that the risk of death from transplantation is 9%. Various aspects of postoperative management, including mechanical ventilation, could affect intensive care unit stay, hospital stay, and immediate postoperative morbidity and mortality. Complications such as reperfusion injury, graft rejection, infection, and dehiscence of anastomosis increase fatal adverse side effects immediately after surgery. In this article, we review the possible immediate complications after lung transplantation and summarize current knowledge on prevention and treatment.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Aspergillus Galactomannan Titer as a Diagnostic Marker of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Lung Transplant Recipients: A Single-Center Retrospective Cohort Study
    Eun-Young Kim, Seung-Hyun Yong, Min-Dong Sung, A-La Woo, Young-Mok Park, Ha-Eun Kim, Su-Jin Jung, Song-Yee Kim, Jin-Gu Lee, Young-Sam Kim, Hyo-Chae Paik, Moo-Suk Park
    Journal of Fungi.2023; 9(5): 527.     CrossRef
  • Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection after lung transplantation: A single-center experience in South Korea
    Youngmok Park, Nam Eun Kim, Se Hyun Kwak, Moo Suk Park, Su Jin Jeong, Jin Gu Lee, Hyo Chae Paik, Song Yee Kim, Young Ae Kang
    Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection.2022; 55(1): 123.     CrossRef
  • Medical Complications of Lung Transplantation
    Moo Suk Park
    Journal of Chest Surgery.2022; 55(4): 338.     CrossRef
  • Roles of electrical impedance tomography in lung transplantation
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Letter to the Editor
Neurology/Obstetric
Myotonic Dystrophy Confirmed after Cesarean Section
Seung Hyun Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Taehoon Ha, Sungwon Na
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):81-82.   Published online February 17, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00864
  • 5,382 View
  • 102 Download
PDF
Original Article
Neurology
The Effect of Electrical Muscle Stimulation and In-bed Cycling on Muscle Strength and Mass of Mechanically Ventilated Patients: A Pilot Study
Kyeongyoon Woo, Jeongmin Kim, Hye Bin Kim, Hyunwoo, Choi, Kibum Kim, Donghyung Lee, Sungwon Na
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(1):16-22.   Published online February 14, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2017.00542
  • 9,415 View
  • 340 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Critically ill patients experience muscle weakness, which leads to functional disability. Both functional electrical stimulation (FES) and in-bed cycling can be an alternative measure for intensive care unit (ICU) patients who are not feasible for active exercise. The aim of this study was to examine whether FES and in-bed cycling have a positive effect on muscle mass in ICU patients.
Methods
Critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours were included. After passive range of motion exercise, in-bed cycling was applied for 20 minutes, and FES was applied for 20 minutes on the left leg. The right leg received in-bed cycling and the left leg received both FES and in-bed cycling. Thigh circumferences and rectus femoris cross-sectional area (CSA) were assessed with ultrasonography before and after the intervention. Muscle strength was assessed by Medical Research Council scale.
Results
A total of 10 patients were enrolled in this study as a pilot study. Before and after the intervention, the CSA of right rectus femoris increased from 5.08 ± 1.51 cm2 to 6.01 ± 2.21 cm2 , which was statistically significant (P = 0.003). The thigh circumference was also increased and statistically significant (P = 0.006). There was no difference between left and right in regard to FES application. There is no significant change in muscle strength before and after the intervention (right and left, P = 0.317 and P = 0.368, respectively).
Conclusions
In-bed cycling increased thigh circumferences rectus femoris CSA. Adding FES did not show differences.

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  • Current Concepts in Early Mobilization of Critically Ill Patients Within the Context of Neurologic Pathology
    Thaís Ferreira Lopes Diniz Maia, Paulo André Freire Magalhães, Dasdores Tatiana Silva Santos, Jorge Luiz de Brito Gomes, Paulo Adriano Schwingel, Aline de Freitas Brito
    Neurocritical Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(22): 12033.     CrossRef
  • Non-paretic lower limb muscle wasting during acute phase is associated with dependent ambulation in patients with stroke
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  • Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness: Not Just Another Muscle Atrophying Condition
    Heta Lad, Tyler M. Saumur, Margaret S. Herridge, Claudia C. dos Santos, Sunita Mathur, Jane Batt, Penney M. Gilbert
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2020; 21(21): 7840.     CrossRef
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  • Exploring the Potential Effectiveness of Combining Optimal Nutrition With Electrical Stimulation to Maintain Muscle Health in Critical Illness: A Narrative Review
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Case Report
Neurosurgery/Hematology
Fatal Intracranial Hemorrhage in a Patient with Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation associated with Sepsis
Hyun Jin Baek, Doo Hyuk Lee, Kyu Hyung Han, Young Min Kim, Hyunbeom Kim, Byeongwook Cho, Inkuk Lee, Kanghyun Choi, Hojin Yong, Goohyeon Hong
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(2):134-139.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.134
  • 16,787 View
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  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
In critically ill patients, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a common and fatal hematological disorder. DIC is a physiological response to a variety of underlying stimuli that provoke generalized activation of the hemostatic mechanism and is common in septic patients and those with hematological or non-hematological malignant neoplasms. Bleeding is a common clinical feature, and diffuse or multiple-site mucocutaneous bleeding, such as petechia, ecchymosis and hemorrhage from gastrointestinal tract, is often seen. A 58-year-old male was recently diagnosed with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) caused by DIC associated with sepsis. Mortality of ICH caused by DIC is very high because the underlying condition cannot be quickly treated. Awareness of the possibility of DIC developing in a critically ill patient and the need for immediate initiation of plasma or platelet replacement therapy are important. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of intracranial hemorrhage in a Korean patient with DIC associated with sepsis.

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  • Perforated Mesenteric Cyst with Sepsis and Neurological Complication in a 9 Month Old Child
    Mandal KC, Saha D, Halder P, Chakraborty P, Debnath B, Mukhopadhyay B
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ACC : Acute and Critical Care