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Volume 36 (3); August 2021
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Review Articles
Infection
Identification and infection control of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales in intensive care units
Jongyoun Yi, Kye-Hyung Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):175-184.   Published online August 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00409
  • 3,447 View
  • 217 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Infections with multidrug-resistant organisms among patients in intensive care units (ICUs) are associated with high mortality. Among multidrug-resistant organisms, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales (CRE) harbor important pathogens for healthcare-associated infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia, and urinary tract infections. Risk factors for CRE colonization include underlying comorbid conditions, prior antibiotics exposure, prior use of healthcare facilities, device use, and longer ICU stay. The mortality rate due to invasive CRE infection is 22%–49%, and CRE colonization is associated with an approximately 10-fold increased risk of CRE infection. Infection control measures include hand hygiene, contact precautions, minimizing the use of devices, and environmental control. Additionally, implementing active surveillance of CRE carriage should be considered in ICU settings.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Identification and Preliminary Hierarchisation of Selected Risk Factors for Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) Colonisation: A Prospective Study
    Małgorzata Timler, Wojciech Timler, Ariadna Bednarz, Łukasz Zakonnik, Remigiusz Kozłowski, Dariusz Timler, Michał Marczak
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(3): 1960.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the certified Copan eSwab system with commercially available cotton swabs for the detection of multidrug-resistant bacteria in rectal swabs
    Norman Lippmann, Sebastian Wendt, Catalina-Suzana Stîngu, Johannes Wiegand, Christoph Lübbert
    American Journal of Infection Control.2022; 50(10): 1145.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Risk Factors and Microbiological and Intestinal Characteristics of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Colonization and Subsequent Infection
    Wenli Yuan, Jiali Xu, Lin Guo, Yonghong Chen, Jinyi Gu, Huan Zhang, Chenghang Yang, Qiuping Yang, Shuwen Deng, Longlong Zhang, Qiongfang Deng, Zi Wang, Bin Ling, Deyao Deng, Arryn Craney, Rafael Vignoli
    Microbiology Spectrum.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Meta-analysis
The efficacy of vitamin C, thiamine, and corticosteroid therapy in adult sepsis patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Manoj Kumar Reddy Somagutta, Maria Kezia Lourdes Pormento, Muhammad Adnan Khan, Alaa Hamdan, Namrata Hange, Manish KC, Sukrut Pagad, Molly Sanjay Jain, Sivasthikka Lingarajah, Vishal Sharma, Jaspreet Kaur, Bernard Emuze, Erkan Batti, Obumneme Jude Iloeje
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):185-200.   Published online June 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00108
  • 9,944 View
  • 398 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Previous studies have suggested favorable outcomes of hydrocortisone, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), and thiamine (HAT) therapy in patients with sepsis. However, similar results have not been duplicated in sequential studies. This meta-analysis aimed to reevaluate the value of HAT treatment in patients with sepsis. Electronic databases were searched up until October 2020 for any studies that compared the effect of HAT versus non-HAT use in patients with sepsis. Data from 15 studies (eight randomized controlled trials [RCTs] and seven cohort studies) involving 67,349 patients were included. The results from the RCTs show no significant benefit of triple therapy on hospital mortality (risk ratio [RR], 0.99; P=0.92; I2=0%); intensive care unit (ICU) mortality (RR, 0.77; P=0.20; I2=58%); ICU length of stay (weighted mean difference [WMD], 0.11; P=0.86; I2 =37%) or hospital length of stay (WMD: 0.57; P=0.49; I2=17%), and renal replacement therapy (RR, 0.64; P=0.44; I2=39%). The delta Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score favored treatment after a sensitivity analysis (WMD, –0.72; P=0.01; I2=32%). However, a significant effect was noted for the duration of vasopressor use (WMD, –25.49; P<0.001; I2=46%). The results from cohort studies have also shown no significant benefit of HAT therapy on hospital mortality, ICU mortality, ICU length of stay, length of hospital stay, the delta SOFA score, the use of renal replacement therapy, or vasopressor duration. HAT therapy significantly reduced the duration of vasopressor use and improved the SOFA score but appeared not to have significant benefits in other outcomes for patients with sepsis. Further RCTs can help understand its benefit exclusively.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Insights Into Thiamine Supplementation in Patients With Septic Shock
    Nara Aline Costa, Amanda Gomes Pereira, Clara Sandra Araujo Sugizaki, Nayane Maria Vieira, Leonardo Rufino Garcia, Sérgio Alberto Rupp de Paiva, Leonardo Antonio Mamede Zornoff, Paula Schmidt Azevedo, Bertha Furlan Polegato, Marcos Ferreira Minicucci
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Vitamin C-induced Hemolysis: Meta-summary and Review of Literature
    Deven Juneja, Ravi Jain
    Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2022; 26(2): 224.     CrossRef
  • Is it time to reconsider the administration of thiamine alone or in combination with vitamin C in critically ill patients? A meta-analysis of clinical trial studies
    Nafiseh Shokri-mashhadi, Ali Aliyari, Zahra Hajhashemy, Saeed Saadat, Mohammad Hossein Rouhani
    Journal of Intensive Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Parenteral Vitamin C in Patients with Severe Infection: A Systematic Review
    Arnav Agarwal, John Basmaji, Shannon M. Fernando, Fang Zhou Ge, Yingqi Xiao, Haseeb Faisal, Kimia Honarmand, Mathieu Hylands, Vincent Lau, Kimberley Lewis, Rachel Couban, François Lamontagne, Neill K. J. Adhikari
    NEJM Evidence.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Unanswered questions on the use of hydrocortisone, ascorbic acid, and thiamine therapy in sepsis and septic shock
    David Ragoonanan, Nicolas Tran, Veeshal Modi, Paige Morgan Nickelsen
    American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy.2022; 79(19): 1626.     CrossRef
  • Impacts of Corticosteroid Therapy at Acute Stage of Hospital-Onset Clostridioides difficile Infections
    Ching-Chi Lee, Jen-Chieh Lee, Chun-Wei Chiu, Pei-Jane Tsai, Wen-Chien Ko, Yuan-Pin Hung
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2022; Volume 15: 5387.     CrossRef
  • The impact of vitamin C-containing treatment on the mortality of patients with sepsis: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    Ching-Yi Chen, Chien-Tung Chiu, Ho-Sheng Lee, Chih-Cheng Lai
    Journal of Infection and Public Health.2022; 15(12): 1514.     CrossRef
  • Role of high dose vitamin C in management of hospitalised COVID-19 patients: A minireview
    Deven Juneja, Anish Gupta, Sahil Kataria, Omender Singh
    World Journal of Virology.2022; 11(5): 300.     CrossRef
  • Current role of high dose vitamin C in sepsis management: A concise review
    Deven Juneja, Prashant Nasa, Ravi Jain
    World Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2022; 11(6): 349.     CrossRef
  • HYDROCORTISONE, ASCORBIC ACID, AND THIAMINE THERAPY DECREASE RENAL OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN MURINE SEPSIS
    John Kim, Allan Stolarski, Qiuyang Zhang, Katherine Wee, Daniel Remick
    Shock.2022; 58(5): 426.     CrossRef
  • Early administration of Vitamin C in patients with sepsis or septic shock in emergency departments: A multicenter, double blinded, randomized controlled trial: The C-EASIE trial protocol
    Stefanie Vandervelden, Lina Wauters, Jan Breuls, Steffen Fieuws, Philippe Vanhove, Ives Hubloue, Magali Bartiaux, Jacques Creteur, François Stifkens, Koen Monsieurs, Didier Desruelles, Elisa Panada
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(11): e0259699.     CrossRef
  • Hydrocortisone, ascorbic acid, and thiamine (HAT) for sepsis and septic shock: a meta-analysis with sequential trial analysis
    Weilan Na, Huili Shen, Yichu Li, Dong Qu
    Journal of Intensive Care.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Pulmonary
The Mount Sinai Hospital Institute for critical care medicine response to the COVID-19 pandemic
Jennifer Wang, Evan Leibner, Jaime B. Hyman, Sanam Ahmed, Joshua Hamburger, Jean Hsieh, Neha Dangayach, Pranai Tandon, Umesh Gidwani, Andrew Leibowitz, Roopa Kohli-Seth
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):201-207.   Published online August 10, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00402
  • 3,234 View
  • 120 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in a surge of critically ill patients. This was especially true in New York City. We present a roadmap for hospitals and healthcare systems to prepare for a Pandemic.
Methods
This was a retrospective review of how Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH) was able to rapidly prepare to handle the pandemic. MSH, the largest academic hospital within the Mount Sinai Health System, rapidly expanded the intensive care unit (ICU) bed capacity, including creating new ICU beds, expanded the workforce, and created guidelines.
Results
MSH a 1,139-bed quaternary care academic referral hospital with 104 ICU beds expanded to 1,453 beds (27.5% increase) with 235 ICU beds (126% increase) during the pandemic peak in the first week of April 2020. From March to June 2020, with follow-up through October 2020, MSH admitted 2,591 COVID-19-positive patients, 614 to ICUs. Most admitted patients received noninvasive support including a non-rebreather mask, high flow nasal cannula, and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. Among ICU patients, 68.4% (n=420) received mechanical ventilation; among the admitted ICU patients, 42.8% (n=263) died, and 47.8% (n=294) were discharged alive.
Conclusions
Flexible bed management initiatives; teamwork across multiple disciplines; and development and implementation of guidelines were critical accommodating the surge of critically ill patients. Non-ICU services and staff were deployed to augment the critical care work force and open new critical care units. This approach to rapidly expand bed availability and staffing across the system helped provide the best care for the patients and saved lives.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Why are there so many hospital beds in Germany?
    Matthias Brunn, Torsten Kratz, Michael Padget, Marie-Caroline Clément, Marc Smyrl
    Health Services Management Research.2023; 36(1): 75.     CrossRef
  • Sustaining the Australian respiratory workforce through the COVID ‐19 pandemic: a scoping literature review
    Emily Stone, Louis B. Irving, Katrina O. Tonga, Bruce Thompson
    Internal Medicine Journal.2022; 52(7): 1115.     CrossRef
  • Outcomes of hip fracture surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic
    Sherrie Wang, MaKenzie Chambers, Kelsey Martin, Grace Gilbert, Pietro M. Gentile, Rock Hwang, Rakesh Mashru, Kenneth W. Graf, Henry J. Dolch
    European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Rapid communication for effective medical resource allocation in the COVID-19 pandemic
    Kwangha Lee
    Acute and Critical Care.2021; 36(3): 262.     CrossRef
  • Triage: Medical Details and Words Matter
    Jolion McGreevy, Rosamond Rhodes
    The American Journal of Bioethics.2021; 21(11): 64.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Impact of prone position on outcomes of COVID-19 patients with spontaneous breathing
Mabrouk Bahloul, Sana Kharrat, Malek Hafdhi, Anis Maalla, Olfa Turki, Kamilia Chtara, Rania Ammar, Basma Suissi, Chokri Ben Hamida, Hedi Chelly, Khaiereddine Ben Mahfoudh, Mounir Bouaziz
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):208-214.   Published online August 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00500
  • 3,670 View
  • 186 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
In this study, we explored whether early application of the prone position (PP) can improve severe hypoxemia and respiratory failure in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with spontaneous breathing.
Methods
This is a prospective observational study of severe, critically ill adult COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit. All vital parameters were recorded in real time for all patients. Moreover, the results of chest computed tomography (CT), when available, were analyzed.
Results
PP was applied in 21 patients who were breathing spontaneously. The application of PP was associated with a significant increase in oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2) from 82%±12% to 96%±3% (P<0.001) 1 hour later. Moreover, PP was associated with a significant reduction in respiratory rate from 31±10 to 21±4 breaths/min (P<0.001). Furthermore, the number of patients who exhibited signs of respiratory distress after PP was reduced from 10 (47%) to 3 (14%) (P=0.04). Early PP application also led to a clear improvement on CT imaging. It was not, however, associated with a reduction in mortality rate or in the use of invasive mechanical ventilation (P>0.05 for both).
Conclusions
Our study confirmed that the early application of PP can improve hypoxemia and tachypnea in COVID-19 patients with spontaneous breathing. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the beneficial effects of PP in COVID-19 patients with spontaneous breathing.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Gravity-induced ischemia in the brain-and prone positioning for COVID-19 patients breathing spontaneously
    J. Howard Jaster, Giulia Ottaviani
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 131.     CrossRef
  • Gravity-induced ischemia in the brain and prone positioning for COVID-19 patients breathing spontaneously: still far from the truth!
    Mabrouk Bahloul, Sana Kharrat, Kamilia Chtara, Hedi Chelly, Chokri Ben Hamida, Mounir Bouaziz
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 134.     CrossRef
  • A Case of COVID-19 with Acute Exacerbation after Anti-Inflammatory Treatment
    Yugo Ashino, Yoichi Shirato, Masahiro Yaegashiwa, Satoshi Yamanouchi, Noriko Miyakawa, Kokichi Ando, Yumiko Sakurada, Haorile Chagan Yasutan, Toshio Hattori
    Reports.2022; 5(2): 24.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of prone position in COVID-19 patients with respiratory failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Hyeon-Jeong Lee, Junghyun Kim, Miyoung Choi, Won-Il Choi, Joonsung Joh, Jungeun Park, Joohae Kim
    European Journal of Medical Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Infection
Sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy is associated with higher mortality rates in patients with sepsis
Balaram Krishna J Hanumanthu, Anika Sasidharan Nair, Adarsh Katamreddy, Jason S Gilbert, Jee Young You, Obiageli Lynda Offor, Ankit Kushwaha, Ankita Krishnan, Marzio Napolitano, Leonidas Palaidimos, Joaquin Morante, Seema S. Tekwani, Suchita Mehta, Aanchal Gupta, Harmeen Goraya, Mengyang Sun, Robert T. Faillace, Perminder Gulani
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):215-222.   Published online July 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00234
  • 2,817 View
  • 207 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Patients with sepsis are at risk for developing sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC). Previous studies offer inconsistent results regarding the association of SIC and mortality. This study sought to assess whether SIC is linked to mortality in patients with sepsis and to evaluate predictors of the development of SIC.
Methods
In this retrospective study, patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit with a diagnosis of sepsis in the absence of acute coronary syndrome were included. SIC was identified using transthoracic echo and was defined by a new onset decline in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤50%, or ≥10% decline in LVEF compared to baseline in patients with a history of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed using the R software program.
Results
Of the 359 patients in the final analysis, 19 (5.3%) had SIC. Eight (42.1%) of the 19 patients in the SIC group and 60 (17.6%) of the 340 patients in the non-SIC group died during hospitalization. SIC was associated with an increased risk for all-cause in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR], 4.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15–18.69; P=0.03). Independent predictors for the development of SIC were albumin level (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.23–0.93; P=0.03) and culture positivity (OR, 8.47; 95% CI, 2.24–55.61; P=0.006). Concomitant right ventricular hypokinesis was noted in 13 (68.4%) of the 19 SIC patients.
Conclusions
SIC was associated with an increased risk for all-cause in-hospital mortality. Low albumin level and culture positivity were independent predictors of SIC.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Therapeutic Dilemmas in Mixed Septic-Cardiogenic Shock
    Daniela Urina Jassir, Antoine H. Chaanine, Sapna Desai, Indranee Rajapreyar, Thierry H. Le Jemtel
    The American Journal of Medicine.2023; 136(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • A case of sepsis‐induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Keigo Sato, Akihiro Naito, Taichi Shiratori, Masahiro Yamamoto, Kenichi Shimane, Manabu Mikami, Mariko Senda, Haruki Kume, Motofumi Suzuki
    IJU Case Reports.2023; 6(1): 26.     CrossRef
  • RNF20 deletion causes inflammation in model of sepsis through the NLRP3 Activation
    Anlong Qi, Yancun Liu, Jianhua Zhai, Yongtao Wang, Wang Li, Tong Wang, Yanfen Chai
    Immunopharmacology and Immunotoxicology.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • S100a8/a9 contributes to sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy by activating ERK1/2-Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and respiratory dysfunction
    Feng Wu, Yan-Ting Zhang, Fei Teng, Hui-Hua Li, Shu-Bin Guo
    International Immunopharmacology.2023; 115: 109716.     CrossRef
  • Protein Phosphatase 2A Improves Cardiac Functional Response to Ischemia and Sepsis
    Ulrich Gergs, Tina Jahn, Nico Schulz, Claudia Großmann, Uwe Rueckschloss, Uta Demus, Igor B. Buchwalow, Joachim Neumann
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(9): 4688.     CrossRef
  • Feasibility and discriminatory value of tissue motion annular displacement in sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy: a single-center retrospective observational study
    Jieqiong Song, Yao Yao, Shilong Lin, Yizhou He, Duming Zhu, Ming Zhong
    Critical Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sepsis-Induced Cardiomyopathy Reviewed: The Case for Early Consideration of Mechanical Support
    Daniel L. Plack, Olivier Royer, Etienne J. Couture, Christoph G.S. Nabzdyk
    Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia.2022; 36(10): 3916.     CrossRef
  • Association of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Yu-Min Lin, Mei-Chuan Lee, Han Siong Toh, Wei-Ting Chang, Sih-Yao Chen, Fang-Hsiu Kuo, Hsin-Ju Tang, Yi-Ming Hua, Dongmei Wei, Jesus Melgarejo, Zhen-Yu Zhang, Chia-Te Liao
    Annals of Intensive Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Comparison of characteristics and ventilatory course between coronavirus disease 2019 and Middle East respiratory syndrome patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome
Imran Khalid, Romaysaa M Yamani, Maryam Imran, Muhammad Ali Akhtar, Manahil Imran, Rumaan Gul, Tabindeh Jabeen Khalid, Ghassan Y Wali
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):223-231.   Published online July 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00388
  • 2,401 View
  • 93 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Both coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); however, their ARDS course and characteristics have not been compared, which we evaluate in our study.
Methods
MERS patients with ARDS seen during the 2014 outbreak and COVID-19 patients with ARDS admitted between March and December 2020 in our hospital were included, and their clinical characteristics, ventilatory course, and outcomes were compared.
Results
Forty-nine and 14 patients met the inclusion criteria for ARDS in the COVID-19 and MERS groups, respectively. Both groups had a median of four comorbidities with high Charlson comorbidity index value of 5 points (P>0.22). COVID-19 patients were older, obese, had significantly higher initial C-reactive protein (CRP), more likely to get trial of high-flow oxygen, and had delayed intubation (P≤0.04). The postintubation course was similar between the groups. Patients in both groups experienced a prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, and majority received paralytics, dialysis, and vasopressor agents (P>0.28). The respiratory and ventilatory parameters after intubation (including tidal volume, fraction of inspired oxygen, peak and plateau pressures) and their progression over 3 weeks were similar (P>0.05). Rates of mortality in the ICU (53% vs. 64%) and hospital (59% vs. 64%) among COVID-19 and MERS patients (P≥0.54) were very high.
Conclusions
Despite some distinctive differences between COVID-19 and MERS patients prior to intubation, the respiratory and ventilatory parameters postintubation were not different. The higher initial CRP level in COVID-19 patients may explain the steroid responsiveness in this population.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Does COVID-19 Vaccine Impact the Soul? A Pre-post Vaccination Comparison of Health Care Workers’ Infection Control Practices and Perspectives
    Imran Khalid, Muhammad Ali Akhtar, Manahil Imran, Maryam Imran, Musaab Ahmed Mujalli, Moayad Sami Qashqari, Abeer N Alshukairi, Amina Nisar, Tabindeh Jabeen Khalid
    Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advances in mRNA and other vaccines against MERS-CoV
    Wanbo Tai, Xiujuan Zhang, Yang Yang, Jiang Zhu, Lanying Du
    Translational Research.2022; 242: 20.     CrossRef
Nursing
Intensive care unit professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain: social and work-related variables, COVID-19 symptoms, worries, and generalized anxiety levels
Fernando J. García-Hedrera, Fernanda Gil-Almagro, F. Javier Carmona-Monge, Cecilia Peñacoba-Puente, Patricia Catalá-Mesón, Lilian Velasco-Furlong
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):232-241.   Published online August 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00213
  • 2,266 View
  • 83 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 outbreak has been identified as a pandemic and global health emergency. It presents as a severe acute respiratory disease. The rapid dissemination of the disease created challenges for healthcare systems and forced healthcare workers (HCWs) to deal with many clinical and nonclinical stresses. The aim of our research is to describe work conditions, symptoms experienced by HCWs, worries about contagion, and generalized anxiety symptoms and compare those findings across regions in Spain. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using an online survey. Critical care units throughout Spain were included. The sample comprised HCWs working in intensive care units from March to May 2020. We assessed work variables, physical symptoms, worries about contagion, and anxiety (generalized anxiety disorder-7 questionnaire). Results: The final sample comprised 448 surveys. Among the respondents, 86.9% (n=389) were nursing professionals, and 84.8% (n=380) were women. All participants cared for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients during the study period. Workload during the pandemic in Madrid was judged to be higher than in other regions (P<0.01). The availability of personal protective equipment was found to be higher in Cataluña. The most frequently experienced symptom was headaches (78.1%). Worries about self-infection and the possibility of infecting others received mean scores of 3.11 and 3.75, respectively. Mean scores for generalized anxiety levels were 11.02, with 58.7% of the professionals presenting with generalized anxiety syndrome during the assessment. Conclusions: In this study, we found high levels of anxiety among HCWs caring directly for COVID-19 patients, which could produce long-term psychological alterations that still need to be assessed.

Citations

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  • Cognitive appraisals and coping strategies of registered nurses in the emergency department combating COVID ‐19: A scoping review
    Chia‐Hung Lin, Shu‐Fen Siao, You‐Jie Lin, Pin‐Hsien Hsin, Mack Shelley, Yen‐Han Lee
    Journal of Nursing Scholarship.2023; 55(1): 79.     CrossRef
  • The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on intensive care unit workers: a nationwide survey
    Sangeeta Mehta, Christopher Yarnell, Sumesh Shah, Peter Dodek, Jeanna Parsons-Leigh, Robert Maunder, Jessica Kayitesi, Catherine Eta-Ndu, Fran Priestap, Danielle LeBlanc, Jennifer Chen, Kimia Honarmand
    Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésie.2022; 69(4): 472.     CrossRef
Thoracic Surgery
Perfusion parameters during cardiopulmonary bypass as a predictor of acute kidney injury after aortic valve replacement
Yeiwon Lee, Sue Hyun Kim, Ho Young Hwang, Suk Ho Sohn, Jae Woong Choi, Kyung Hwan Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):242-248.   Published online August 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00094
  • 2,555 View
  • 84 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major complication after cardiac surgery and significantly affects postoperative mortality and morbidity. This study was conducted to evaluate the association between target pump flow to achieve adequate oxygen delivery (DO2) and postoperative renal function after aortic valve replacement.
Methods
From January 2017 to May 2020, 281 patients (male:female, 160:121; mean age, 68±11 years) who underwent aortic valve replacement were retrospectively reviewed. Target pump flow was calculated based on DO2 level of 280 mL/min/m2. The primary endpoint was postoperative renal dysfunction, defined as the ratio of postoperative peak creatinine level to preoperative value. The ratio of the lowest actual pump flow to the ideal target pump flow, other hemodynamic variables related with cardiopulmonary bypass, intraoperative transfusion, and preoperative characteristics were analyzed to identify factors associated with the primary endpoint using a multivariable linear regression model.
Results
Preoperative and peak postoperative creatinine levels were 0.94±0.33 mg/dl and 1.15±0.56 mg/dl, respectively (ratio, 1.22±0.33). The ideal target pump flow was 4.70±0.59 L/min, whereas the lowest actual pump flow was 3.77±0.47 L/min (ratio, 0.81±0.13). The multivariable model showed that the ratio of the lowest pump flow to target pump flow (β±standard error, –0.405±0.162, P=0.013), as well as sex, stroke history, emergency operation, and transfusion of red blood cells were associated with the primary endpoint.
Conclusions
Low actual nadir pump flow compared to the ideal target pump flow based on DO2 is associated with the risk of AKI after aortic valve replacement.
Pulmonary
Effects of high-flow nasal cannula in patients with mild to moderate hypercapnia: a prospective observational study
Kyung Hun Nam, Hyung Koo Kang, Sung-Soon Lee, So-Hee Park, Sung Wook Kang, Jea Jun Hwang, So Young Park, Won Young Kim, Hee Jung Suh, Eun Young Kim, Ga Jin Seo, Younsuck Koh, Sang-Bum Hong, Jin Won Huh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):249-255.   Published online July 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.01102
  • 3,362 View
  • 181 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Evidence for using high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in hypercapnia is still limited. Most of the clinical studies had been conducted retrospectively, and there had been conflicting reports for the effects of HFNC on hypercapnia correction in prospective studies. Therefore, more evidence is needed to understand the effect of the HFNC in hypercapnia.
Methods
We conducted a multicenter prospective observational study after applying HFNC to 45 hospitalized subjects who had moderate hypercapnia (arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide [PaCO2], 43–70 mm Hg) without severe respiratory acidosis (pH <7.30). The primary outcome was a change in PaCO2 level in the first 24 hours of HFNC use. The secondary outcomes were changes in other parameters of arterial blood gas analysis, changes in respiration rates, and clinical outcomes.
Results
There was a significant decrease in PaCO2 in the first hour of HFNC application (-3.80 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -6.35 to -1.24; P<0.001). Reduction of PaCO2 was more prominent in subjects who did not have underlying obstructive lung disease. There was a correction in pH, but no significant changes in respiratory rate, bicarbonate, and arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio. Mechanical ventilation was not required for 93.3% (42/45) of our study population.
Conclusions
We suggest that HFNC could be a safe alternative for oxygen delivery in hypercapnia patients who do not need immediate mechanical ventilation. With HFNC oxygenation, correction of hypercapnia could be expected, especially in patients who do not have obstructive lung diseases.

Citations

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  • Current status of treatment of acute respiratory failure in Korea
    Yong Jun Choi, Jae Hwa Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 124.     CrossRef
  • High-flow nasal cannula: Evaluation of the perceptions of various performance aspects among Chinese clinical staff and establishment of a multidimensional clinical evaluation system
    Ruoxuan Wen, Xingshuo Hu, Tengchen Wei, Kaifei Wang, Zhimei Duan, Zhanqi Zhao, Lixin Xie, Fei Xie
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Application Progress of HFNC in Respiratory Diseases
    迪 吴
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2022; 12(11): 10617.     CrossRef
Infection
Clinical features and outcomes of critically ill patients with Elizabethkingia meningoseptica: an emerging pathogen
Abdullah Umair, Nosheen Nasir
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):256-261.   Published online July 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.01158
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  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, formerly known as Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, is a non-motile, non-fastidious, catalase and oxidase-positive, aerobic, glucosenon- fermentative, Gram-negative bacillus that was first defined by Elizabeth O. King in 1959. It has emerged as an opportunistic pathogen that has infected patients in extreme age groups and immunocompromised individuals, especially in intensive care settings. There has been an increased interest in this pathogen due to its increasing occurrence around the world, ubiquitous nature, and inherent capacity for antimicrobial resistance.
Methods
We describe an observational study at a tertiary care center in Karachi, Pakistan, based on patients admitted between January 2013 and December 2018, with E. meningoseptica infections. All patients were confirmed to have a positive clinical culture specimen for E. meningoseptica along with symptoms and signs consistent with infection. Data were collected on a structured proforma from the Hospital Information Management Systems.
Results
Sixteen patients with E. meningoseptica that met the criteria for infection were identified, 13 of whom required admission. Eight patients had bacteremia in addition to confirmed E. meningoseptica infection. Two of the isolates were multi-drug resistant and only sensitive to minocycline. Nine out of 13 patients that were admitted required intubation and mechanical ventilation. The median length of hospital stay was 13 days, and five out of the 13 patients died during the hospital stay.
Conclusions
This is the largest case series to date reporting E. meningoseptica infections and highlights the importance of this organism as an emerging nosocomial pathogen.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Multi-Drug-Resistant Elizabethkingia meningoseptica: A Rare Cause of Late-Onset Sepsis in a Preterm Neonate
    Abdul Wasey Hashmi, Muhammad Ahmad, Muhammad Muneeb Israr, Ibtesam e Fajar, Farid Adnan
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory features of patients infected with Elizabethkingia meningoseptica at a tertiary hospital in Hefei City, China
    Yajuan Li, Tingting Liu, Cuixiao Shi, Bo Wang, Tingting Li, Ying Huang, Yuanhong Xu, Ling Tang
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Editorial
Pulmonary
Rapid communication for effective medical resource allocation in the COVID-19 pandemic
Kwangha Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):262-263.   Published online August 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01046
  • 1,764 View
  • 64 Download
  • 1 Citations
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of clinical characteristics and hospital mortality in critically ill patients without COVID-19 before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: a multicenter, retrospective, propensity score-matched study
    Sua Kim, Hangseok Choi, Jae Kyeom Sim, Won Jai Jung, Young Seok Lee, Je Hyeong Kim
    Annals of Intensive Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Report
Gastroenterology
Circumferential esophageal perforation resulting in tension hydropneumothorax in a patient with septic shock
Saad Saffo, James Farrell, Anil Nagar
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):264-268.   Published online March 11, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.01067
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Esophageal perforations occur traumatically or spontaneously and are typically associated with high mortality rates. Early recognition and prompt management are essential. We present the case of a 76-year-old man who was admitted to the medical intensive care unit with fulminant Clostridium difficile colitis, shock, and multi-organ failure. After an initial period of improvement, his condition rapidly deteriorated despite aggressive medical management, and he required mechanical ventilation. Radiography after endotracheal intubation showed interval development of pneumomediastinum and bilateral hydropneumothorax with tension physiology. Chest tube placement resulted in the drainage of multiple liters of dark fluid, and pleural fluid analysis was notable for polymicrobial empyemas. Despite the unusual presentation, esophageal perforation was suspected. Endoscopy ultimately confirmed circumferential separation of the distal esophagus from the stomach, and bedside endoscopic stenting was performed with transient improvement. Two weeks after admission, he developed mediastinitis complicated by recurrent respiratory failure and passed away. This report further characterizes our patient’s unique presentation and briefly highlights the clinical manifestations, management options, and outcomes of esophageal perforations.
Image in Critical Care
Thoracic Surgery
Thoracomyoplasty and perioperative negative wound pressure therapy for bronchopleural fistula after trans-sternal bronchial closure
Jinwook Hwang, Jeong In Hong, Hong Ju Shin, Jae Seung Shin, Je Hyeong Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):269-273.   Published online August 3, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00626
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ACC : Acute and Critical Care