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Review Articles
Meta-analysis
The impact of ketamine on outcomes in critically ill patients: a systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of randomized controlled trials
Yerkin Abdildin, Karina Tapinova, Assel Nemerenova, Dmitriy Viderman
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):34-46.   Published online February 28, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00829
  • 1,946 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the effects of ketamine in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients.
Methods
We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in PubMed, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library; the search was performed initially in January but was repeated in December of 2023. We focused on ICU patients of any age. We included studies that compared ketamine with other traditional agents used in the ICU. We synthesized evidence using RevMan v5.4 and presented the results as forest plots. We also used trial sequential analysis (TSA) software v. 0.9.5.10 Beta and presented results as TSA plots. For synthesizing results, we used a random-effects model and reported differences in outcomes of two groups in terms of mean difference (MD), standardized MD, and risk ratio with 95% confidence interval. We assessed the risk of bias using the Cochrane RoB tool for RCTs. Our outcomes were mortality, pain, opioid and midazolam requirements, delirium rates, and ICU length of stay.
Results
Twelve RCTs involving 805 ICU patients (ketamine group, n=398; control group, n=407) were included in the meta-analysis. The ketamine group was not superior to the control group in terms of mortality (in five studies with 318 patients), pain (two studies with 129 patients), mean and cumulative opioid consumption (six studies with 494 patients), midazolam consumption (six studies with 304 patients), and ICU length of stay (three studies with 270 patients). However, the model favored the ketamine group over the control group in delirium rate (four studies with 358 patients). This result is significant in terms of conventional boundaries (alpha=5%) but is not robust in sequential analysis. The applicability of the findings is limited by the small number of patients pooled for each outcome.
Conclusions
Our meta-analysis did not demonstrate differences between ketamine and control groups regarding any outcome except delirium rate, where the model favored the ketamine group over the control group. However, this result is not robust as sensitivity analysis and trial sequential analysis suggest that more RCTs should be conducted in the future.
Trauma
Abdominal compartment syndrome in critically ill patients
Hyunseok Jang, Naa Lee, Euisung Jeong, Yunchul Park, Younggoun Jo, Jungchul Kim, Dowan Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(4):399-408.   Published online November 29, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01263
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  • 2,138 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Intra-abdominal hypertension can have severe consequences, including abdominal compartment syndrome, which can contribute to multi-organ failure. An increase in intra-abdominal hypertension is influenced by factors such as diminished abdominal wall compliance, increased intraluminal content, and certain systemic conditions. Regular measurement of intra-abdominal pressure is essential, and particular attention must be paid to patient positioning. Nonsurgical treatments, such as decompression of intraluminal content using a nasogastric tube, percutaneous drainage, and fluid balance optimization, play crucial roles. Additionally, point-of-care ultrasonography aids in the diagnosis and treatment of intra-abdominal hypertension. Emphasizing the importance of regular measurements, timely decompressive laparotomy is a definitive, but complex, treatment option. Balancing the urgency of surgical intervention against potential postoperative complications is challenging.
Original Articles
Nursing
The effects of environmental interventions for delirium in critically ill surgical patients
Hak-Jae Lee, Yoon-Joong Jung, Nak-Joon Choi, Suk-Kyung Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(4):479-487.   Published online November 28, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00990
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  • 65 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Delirium occurs at high rates among patients in intensive care units and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of environmental interventions on delirium.
Methods
This prospective cohort study enrolled 192 patients admitted to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) during the pre-intervention (June 2013 to October 2013) and post-intervention (June 2014 to October 2014) periods. Environmental interventions involved a cognitive assessment, an orientation, and a comfortable environment including proper sleep conditions. The primary outcomes were the prevalence, duration, and onset of delirium.
Results
There were no statistically significant differences in incidence rate, time of delirium onset, general characteristics, and mortality between the pre-intervention and post-intervention groups. The durations of delirium were 14.4±19.1 and 7.7±7.3 days in the pre-intervention and post-intervention groups, respectively, a significant reduction (P=0.027). The lengths of SICU stay were 20.0±22.9 and 12.6±8.7 days for the pre-intervention and post-intervention groups, respectively, also a significant reduction (P=0.030).
Conclusions
The implementation of an environmental intervention program reduced the duration of delirium and length of stay in the SICU for critically ill surgical patients.
Infection
Healthcare-associated infections in critical COVID-19 patients in Tunis: epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes
Ahlem Trifi, Selim Sellaouti, Asma Mehdi, Lynda Messaoud, Eya Seghir, Badis Tlili, Sami Abdellatif
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(4):425-434.   Published online November 28, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00773
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic disrupted adherences to healthcare-associated infection (HAI) prevention protocols. Herein, we studied the characteristics of all HAIs occurring in critically ill COVID-19 patients.
Methods
A retrospective, single-center cohort of critical COVID-19 patients during 2021. Microbiological samples were collected if HAI was suspected. We analyzed all factors that could potentially induce HAI, using septic shock and mortality as endpoints.
Results
Sixty-four among 161 included patients (39.7%) presented a total of 117 HAIs with an incidence density of 69.2 per 1,000 hospitalization days. Compared to the prior COVID-19 period (2013–2019), the identification of HAI increased in 2021. HAIs were classified into ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP; n=38), bloodstream infection (n=32), urinary tract infection (n=24), catheter-related infection (n=12), and fungal infection (n=11). All HAIs occurred significantly earlier in the post–COVID-19 period (VAP: 6 vs. 10 days, P=0.045, in 2017 and 2021). Acinetobacter baumannii (39.5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (27%) were the most commonly isolated pathogens that exhibited a multidrug-resistant (MDR) profile, observed in 89% and 64.5%, respectively. The HAI factors were laboratory abnormalities (odds ratio [OR], 6.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3–26.0), cumulative steroid dose (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.3–4.0), and invasive procedures (OR, 20.7; 95% CI, 5.3–64.0). HAI was an independent factor of mortality (OR, 8.5; P=0.004).
Conclusions
During the COVID-19 era, the incidence of HAIs increased and MDR isolates remained frequent. A severe biological inflammatory syndrome, invasive devices, and elevated cumulative steroid dosages were related to HAIs. HAI was a significant death factor.
CPR/Resuscitation
Percent fluid overload for prediction of fluid de-escalation in critically ill patients in Saudi Arabia: a prospective observational study
Reham A. Alharbi, Namareq F. Aldardeer, Emily L. G. Heaphy, Ahmad H. Alabbasi, Amjad M. Albuqami, Hassan Hawa
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):209-216.   Published online May 16, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01550
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Percent fluid overload greater than 5% is associated with increased mortality. The appropriate time for fluid deresuscitation depends on the patient's radiological and clinical findings. This study aimed to assess the applicability of percent fluid overload calculations for evaluating the need for fluid deresuscitation in critically ill patients. Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, observational study of critically ill adult patients requiring intravenous fluid administration. The study's primary outcome was median percent fluid accumulation on the day of fluid deresuscitation or intensive care unit (ICU) discharge, whichever came first. Results: A total of 388 patients was screened between August 1, 2021, and April 30, 2022. Of these, 100 with a mean age of 59.8±16.2 years were included for analysis. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 15.4±8.0. Sixty-one patients (61.0%) required fluid deresuscitation during their ICU stay, while 39 (39.0%) did not. Median percent fluid accumulation on the day of deresuscitation or ICU discharge was 4.5% (interquartile range [IQR], 1.7%–9.1%) and 5.2% (IQR, 2.9%–7.7%) in patients requiring deresuscitation and those who did not, respectively. Hospital mortality occurred in 25 (40.9%) of patients with deresuscitation and six (15.3%) patients who did not require it (P=0.007). Conclusions: The percent fluid accumulation on the day of fluid deresuscitation or ICU discharge was not statistically different between patients who required fluid deresuscitation and those who did not. A larger sample size is needed to confirm these findings.
Infection
Evaluating the use of the respiratory-rate oxygenation index as a predictor of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen failure in COVID-19
Scott Weerasuriya, Savvas Vlachos, Ahmed Bobo, Namitha Birur Jayaprabhu, Lauren Matthews, Adam R Blackstock, Victoria Metaxa
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):31-40.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01081
  • 1,855 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
It can be challenging for clinicians to predict which patients with respiratory failure secondary to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) will fail on high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen and require escalation of therapy. This study set out to evaluate the association between the respiratory rate-oxygenation index (ROX) and HFNC failure in such patients and to assess whether ROX trajectory correlates with treatment failure.
Methods
This was a single-centre, retrospective, observational study of patients with COVID-19 requiring HFNC, conducted over a 3-month period. ROX was calculated as “pulse-oximetry oxygen saturation (SpO2) over the fractional inspired oxygen concentration (FiO2)/respiratory rate” for each patient at 2, 4, and 12 hours from starting HFNC. HFNC failure was defined as escalation to continuous positive airway pressure ventilation or invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Time-to-event analyses were performed to account for the longitudinal data set and time-dependent variables.
Results
We included 146 patients. Ninety-three (63.7%) experienced HFNC failure, with 53 (36.3%) requiring IMV. Higher ROX values were associated with a lower subhazard of HFNC failure on time-to-HFNC failure analysis (subhazard ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18–0.46; P<0.001). This remained true after controlling for informative censoring. Median ROX values changed differentially over time, increasing in the HFNC success group (0.06 per hour; 95% CI, 0.05–0.08; P<0.001) but not in the HFNC failure group (0.004 per hour; 95% CI, –0.05 to 0.08; P=0.890).
Conclusions
A higher ROX is associated with a lower risk of HFNC failure. Monitoring ROX trajectory over time may help identify patients at risk of treatment failure. This has potential clinical applications; however, future prospective studies are required.
Review Article
Nursing
Theoretical definition of nurse–conscious mechanically ventilated patient communication: a scoping review with qualitative content analysis
Arezoo Mohamadkhani Ghiasvand, Meimanat Hosseini, Foroozan Atashzadeh-Shoorideh
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):8-20.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01039
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  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Providing critical nursing care for conscious mechanically ventilated patients is mediated via effective communication. This study aimed to identify and map the antecedents, attributes, consequences, and definition of nurse–conscious mechanically ventilated patient communication (N-CMVPC). This scoping review was conducted by searching the Cochrane Library and the CINAHL, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus databases, between 2001 and 2021. The keywords queried included "nurses," "mechanically ventilated patients," "mechanical ventilation," "intubated patients," "communication," "interaction," "relationships," "nurse–patient communication," "nurse–patient relations," "intensive care units," and "critical care." Studies related to communication with healthcare personnel or family members were excluded. The results indicated that N-CMVPC manifests as a set of attributes in communication experiences, emotions, methods, and behaviors of the nurse and the patient and is classified into three main themes, nurse communication, patient communication, and quantitative-qualitative aspects. N-CMVPC is a complex, multidimensional, and multi-factor concept. It is often nurse-controlled and can express itself as questions, sentences, or commands in the context of experiences, feelings, and positive or negative behaviors involving the nurse and the patient.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Study on Nurses' Communication Experiences with Intubation Patients
    Ye Rim Kim, Hye Ree Park, Mee Kyung Shin
    The Korean Journal of Rehabilitation Nursing.2023; 26(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • The Application of Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Intubated Patients in the Intensive Care Unit: A Scoping Review
    Mee-Kyung Shin, Hyejin Jeon
    The Korean Journal of Rehabilitation Nursing.2023; 26(2): 97.     CrossRef
Original Article
Pediatrics
Multicenter validation of a deep-learning-based pediatric early-warning system for prediction of deterioration events
Yunseob Shin, Kyung-Jae Cho, Yeha Lee, Yu Hyeon Choi, Jae Hwa Jung, Soo Yeon Kim, Yeo Hyang Kim, Young A Kim, Joongbum Cho, Seong Jong Park, Won Kyoung Jhang
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):654-666.   Published online October 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00976
  • 2,767 View
  • 182 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Early recognition of deterioration events is crucial to improve clinical outcomes. For this purpose, we developed a deep-learning-based pediatric early-warning system (pDEWS) and aimed to validate its clinical performance. Methods: This is a retrospective multicenter cohort study including five tertiary-care academic children’s hospitals. All pediatric patients younger than 19 years admitted to the general ward from January 2019 to December 2019 were included. Using patient electronic medical records, we evaluated the clinical performance of the pDEWS for identifying deterioration events defined as in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) and unexpected general ward-to-pediatric intensive care unit transfer (UIT) within 24 hours before event occurrence. We also compared pDEWS performance to those of the modified pediatric early-warning score (PEWS) and prediction models using logistic regression (LR) and random forest (RF). Results: The study population consisted of 28,758 patients with 34 cases of IHCA and 291 cases of UIT. pDEWS showed better performance for predicting deterioration events with a larger area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, fewer false alarms, a lower mean alarm count per day, and a smaller number of cases needed to examine than the modified PEWS, LR, or RF models regardless of site, event occurrence time, age group, or sex. Conclusions: The pDEWS outperformed modified PEWS, LR, and RF models for early and accurate prediction of deterioration events regardless of clinical situation. This study demonstrated the potential of pDEWS as an efficient screening tool for efferent operation of rapid response teams.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predicting cardiac arrest after neonatal cardiac surgery
    Alexis L. Benscoter, Mark A. Law, Santiago Borasino, A. K. M. Fazlur Rahman, Jeffrey A. Alten, Mihir R. Atreya
    Intensive Care Medicine – Paediatric and Neonatal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Volumetric regional MRI and neuropsychological predictors of motor task variability in cognitively unimpaired, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and probable Alzheimer's disease older adults
    Michael Malek-Ahmadi, Kevin Duff, Kewei Chen, Yi Su, Jace B. King, Vincent Koppelmans, Sydney Y. Schaefer
    Experimental Gerontology.2023; 173: 112087.     CrossRef
  • Predicting sepsis using deep learning across international sites: a retrospective development and validation study
    Michael Moor, Nicolas Bennett, Drago Plečko, Max Horn, Bastian Rieck, Nicolai Meinshausen, Peter Bühlmann, Karsten Borgwardt
    eClinicalMedicine.2023; 62: 102124.     CrossRef
  • A model study for the classification of high-risk groups for cardiac arrest in general ward patients using simulation techniques
    Seok Young Song, Won-Kee Choi, Sanggyu Kwak
    Medicine.2023; 102(37): e35057.     CrossRef
  • An advanced pediatric early warning system: a reliable sentinel, not annoying extra work
    Young Joo Han
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(4): 667.     CrossRef
Review Article
Basic science and research
Barriers and facilitators in the provision of palliative care in adult intensive care units: a scoping review
Christantie Effendy, Yodang Yodang, Sarah Amalia, Erna Rochmawati
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):516-526.   Published online October 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00745
  • 4,462 View
  • 341 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The provision of palliative care in the intensive care unit (ICU) is increasing. While some scholars have suggested the goals of palliative care to not be aligned with the ICU, some evidence show benefits of the integration. This review aimed to explore and synthesize research that identified barriers and facilitators in the provision of palliative care in the ICU. This review utilized Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Scoping Review guidelines based on population, concept, and context. We searched for eligible studies in five electronic databases (Scopus, PubMed, ProQuest, Science Direct, and Sage) and included studies on the provision of palliative care (concept) in the ICU (context) that were published in English between 2005–2021. We describe the provision of palliative care in terms of barriers and facilitators. We also describe the study design and context. A total of 14 papers was included. Several barriers and facilitators in providing palliative care in the ICU were identified and include lack of capabilities, family boundaries, practical issues, cultural differences. Facilitators of the provision of palliative care in an ICU include greater experience and supportive behaviors, i.e., collaborations between health care professionals. This scoping review demonstrates the breadth of barriers and facilitators of palliative care in the ICU. Hospital management can consider findings of the current review to better integrate palliative care in the ICU.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A necessidade dos cuidados paliativos na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI)
    Larissa Kênia de Oliveira Barros Dos Santos, Isabella Rodrigues Ribeiro, João Pedro Manduca Ferreira, Victor Hugo Oliveira Moraes, Érika Aguiar Lara Pereira
    Cuadernos de Educación y Desarrollo.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • End-of-life Care in the Intensive Care Unit and Ethics of Withholding/Withdrawal of Life-sustaining Treatments
    Andrea Cortegiani, Mariachiara Ippolito, Sebastiano Mercadante
    Anesthesiology Clinics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What helps or hinders effective end-of-life care in adult intensive care units in Middle Eastern countries? A systematic review
    Nabat Almalki, Breidge Boyle, Peter O’Halloran
    BMC Palliative Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Patterns of care at the end of life: a retrospective study of Italian patients with advanced breast cancer
    Irene Giannubilo, Linda Battistuzzi, Eva Blondeaux, Tommaso Ruelle, Francesca Benedetta Poggio, Giulia Buzzatti, Alessia D’Alonzo, Federica Della Rovere, Maria Maddalena Latocca, Chiara Molinelli, Maria Grazia Razeti, Simone Nardin, Luca Arecco, Marta Per
    BMC Palliative Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Healthcare Professionals’ Attitudes towards and Knowledge and Understanding of Paediatric Palliative Medicine (PPM) and Its Meaning within the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU): A Summative Content Analysis in a Tertiary Children’s Hospital in Scotlan
    Satyajit Ray, Emma Victoria McLorie, Jonathan Downie
    Healthcare.2023; 11(17): 2438.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Pediatrics
Characteristics and prognostic factors of very elderly patients admitted to the intensive care unit
Song-I Lee, Younsuck Koh, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):372-381.   Published online August 4, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00066
  • 3,644 View
  • 230 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Korea is rapidly becoming a super aging society and is facing the increased burden of critical care for the elderly people. Traditionally, far-advanced age has been regarded as a triage criterion for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We evaluated how the characteristics and prognostic factors of very elderly patients (≥85 years) admitted to the ICU changed over the last decade.
Methods
We retrospectively evaluated the data of patients admitted to the ICU over 11 years (2007–2017). The clinical characteristics and outcomes of the very elderly-patients group were evaluated. Factors associated with mortality were assessed by a cox regression analysis.
Results
Comparing the first half (2007–2012) and the second half (2013–2017) of the study period, the proportion of very elderly group increased from 603/47,657 (1.3%), to 697/37,756 (1.8%) (P<0.001). Among 1,294 very elderly patients, 1,274 patients were analyzed excluding hopeless discharge (n=20). The non-surgical reasons for ICU admission (67.0% vs. 76.1%, P<0.001) and the percentage of patients with co-morbidities (78.3% vs. 82.7%, P=0.048) were increased. Nevertheless, the hospital mortality decreased (21.3% vs. 14.9%, P=0.001). High creatinine levels, use of vasopressors and ventilator weaning failure were associated with in-hospital mortality.
Conclusions
The proportion of very elderly people in the ICU increased over the last decade. The non-surgical causes of ICU admission increased compared with the surgical causes. Despite an increasement in ICU admissions of very elderly patients, in-hospital mortality of very elderly ICU patients decreased.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Chronicles of change for the future: The imperative of continued data collection in French ICUs
    Takashi Tagami
    Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine.2023; 42(5): 101294.     CrossRef
  • We need a comprehensive intensive care unit management strategy for older patients
    Dong-Ick Shin
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(3): 468.     CrossRef
Nutrition
Effect of a nutritional support protocol on enteral nutrition and clinical outcomes of critically ill patients: a retrospective cohort study
Heemoon Park, Sung Yoon Lim, Sebin Kim, Hyung-Sook Kim, Soyeon Kim, Ho Il Yoon, Young-Jae Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):382-390.   Published online July 19, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00220
  • 3,324 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Enteral nutrition (EN) supply within 48 hours after intensive care unit (ICU) admission improves clinical outcomes. The “new ICU evaluation & development of nutritional support protocol (NICE-NST)” was introduced in an ICU of tertiary academic hospital. This study showed that early EN through protocolized nutritional support would supply more nutrition to improve clinical outcomes.
Methods
This study screened 170 patients and 62 patients were finally enrolled; patients who were supplied nutrition without the protocol were classified as the control group (n=40), while those who were supplied according to the protocol were classified as the test group (n=22).
Results
In the test group, EN started significantly earlier (3.7±0.4 days vs. 2.4±0.5 days, P=0.010). EN calorie (4.0±1.0 kcal/kg vs. 6.7±0.9 kcal/kg, P=0.006) and protein (0.17±0.04 g/kg vs. 0.32±0.04 g/kg, P=0.002) supplied were significantly higher in the test group. Although EN was supplied through continuous feeding in the test group, there was no difference in complications such as feeding hold due to excessive gastric residual volume or vomit, and hyper- or hypo-glycemia between the two groups. Hospital mortality was significantly lower in the group that started EN within 1.5 days (42.9% vs. 11.8%, P=0.018). The proportion of patients who started EN within 1.5 days was higher in the test group (40.9% vs. 17.5%, P=0.044).
Conclusions
The NICE-NST may improve EN supply and mortality of critically ill patients without increasing complications.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Nutritional support for patients with abdominal surgical pathology: the view of a surgeon and an anesthesiologist — opponents or allies?
    Natalya P. Shen, Svetlana Yu. Mukhacheva
    Clinical nutrition and metabolism.2023; 3(4): 181.     CrossRef
  • Provision of Enteral Nutrition in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit: A Multicenter Prospective Observational Study
    Chan-Hee Park, Hak-Jae Lee, Suk-Kyung Hong, Yang-Hee Jun, Jeong-Woo Lee, Nak-Jun Choi, Kyu-Hyouck Kyoung
    Annals of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.2022; 14(2): 66.     CrossRef
Infection
In-hospital mortality prediction using frailty scale and severity score in elderly patients with severe COVID-19
Yong Sub Na, Jin Hyoung Kim, Moon Seong Baek, Won-Young Kim, Ae-Rin Baek, Bo young Lee, Gil Myeong Seong, Song-I Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):303-311.   Published online July 5, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00017
  • 3,869 View
  • 214 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Elderly patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have a high disease severity and mortality. However, the use of the frailty scale and severity score to predict in-hospital mortality in the elderly is not well established. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the use of these scores in COVID-19 cases in the elderly.
Methods
This multicenter retrospective study included severe COVID-19 patients admitted to seven hospitals in Republic of Korea from February 2020 to February 2021. We evaluated patients’ Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score; confusion, urea nitrogen, respiratory rate, blood pressure, 65 years of age and older (CURB-65) score; modified early warning score (MEWS); Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score; clinical frailty scale (CFS) score; and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). We evaluated the predictive value using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis.
Results
The study included 318 elderly patients with severe COVID-19 of whom 237 (74.5%) were survivors and 81 (25.5%) were non-survivors. The non-survivor group was older and had more comorbidities than the survivor group. The CFS, CCI, APACHE II, SOFA, CURB-65, and MEWS scores were higher in the non-survivor group than in the survivor group. When analyzed using the ROC curve, SOFA score showed the best performance in predicting the prognosis of elderly patients (area under the curve=0.766, P<0.001). CFS and SOFA scores were associated with in-hospital mortality in the multivariate analysis.
Conclusions
The SOFA score is an efficient tool for assessing in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with severe COVID-19.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Risk factors for progressing to critical illness in patients with hospital-acquired COVID-19
    Kyung-Eui Lee, Jinwoo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Hong Yeul Lee
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2024; 39(3): 477.     CrossRef
  • Omicron, Long-COVID, and the Safety of Elective Surgery for Adults and Children: Joint Guidance from the Therapeutics and Guidelines Committee of the Surgical Infection Society and the Surgery Strategic Clinical Network, Alberta Health Services
    Philip S. Barie, Mary E. Brindle, Rachel G. Khadaroo, Tara L. Klassen, Jared M. Huston
    Surgical Infections.2023; 24(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of risk scores as predictors of mortality and hospital length of stay for older COVID‐19 patients
    Banu Buyukaydin, Tahsin Karaaslan, Omer Uysal
    AGING MEDICINE.2023; 6(1): 56.     CrossRef
  • Atypical presentation of COVID-19 in older patients is associated with frailty but not with adverse outcomes
    Joy E. van Son, Elisabeth C. P. Kahn, Jessica M. van der Bol, Dennis G. Barten, Laura C. Blomaard, Carmen van Dam, Jacobien Ellerbroek, Steffy W. M. Jansen, Anita Lekx, Carolien M. J. van der Linden, Roy Looman, Huub A. A. M. Maas, Francesco U. S. Mattace
    European Geriatric Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Neurological Manifestations and Complications of the Central Nervous System as Risk Factors and Predictors of Mortality in Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19: A Cohort Study
    Ana Luisa Corona-Nakamura, Martha Judith Arias-Merino, Rayo Morfín-Otero, Guillermo Rodriguez-Zavala, Alfredo León-Gil, Juan Ramsés Camarillo-Escalera, Idarmis Brisseida Reyes-Cortés, María Gisela Valdovinos-Ortega, Erick René Nava-Escobar, Ana María de l
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(12): 4065.     CrossRef
  • Modified Early Warning Score: Clinical Deterioration of Mexican Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19 and Chronic Disease
    Nicolás Santiago González, María de Lourdes García-Hernández, Patricia Cruz-Bello, Lorena Chaparro-Díaz, María de Lourdes Rico-González, Yolanda Hernández-Ortega
    Healthcare.2023; 11(19): 2654.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors and Predictive Model for Mortality of Hospitalized COVID-19 Elderly Patients from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Thailand
    Mallika Chuansangeam, Bunyarat Srithan, Pattharawin Pattharanitima, Pawit Phadungsaksawasdi
    Medicines.2023; 10(11): 59.     CrossRef
Pediatrics
Hearing screening outcomes in pediatric critical care survivors: a 1-year report
Pattita Suwannatrai, Chanapai Chaiyakulsil
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(2):209-216.   Published online March 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00899
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Hearing loss is a potentially serious complication that can occur after surviving a critical illness. Study on screening for hearing problems in pediatric critical care survivors beyond the neonatal period is lacking. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of abnormal hearing screening outcomes using transitory evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) screening in children who survived critical illness and to find possible associating factors for abnormal hearing screening results.
Methods
This study was a single-center, prospective, observational study. All children underwent otoscopy to exclude external and middle ear abnormalities before undergoing TEOAE screening. The screening was conducted before hospital discharge. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and logistic regression tests were used for data analysis.
Results
A total of 92 children were enrolled. Abnormal TEOAE responses were identified in 26 participants (28.3%). Children with abnormal responses were significantly younger than those with normal responses with a median age of 10.0 months and 43.5 months, respectively (P<0.001). Positive association with abnormal responses was found in children younger than 12 months of age (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06–8.90) and children with underlying genetic conditions (adjusted OR, 6.95; 95% CI, 1.49–32.54).
Conclusions
Our study demonstrates a high prevalence of abnormal TEOAE screening responses in children surviving critical illness, especially in patients younger than 12 months of age. More extensive studies should be performed to identify the prevalence and associated risk factors of hearing problems in critically ill children.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Physiological and electrophysiological evaluation of the hearing system in low birth weight neonates treated with cholestin: a cohort study
    Nastaran Khosravi, Malihah Mazaheryazdi, Majid Kalani, Nasrin Khalesi, Zinat Shakeri, Saeedeh Archang, Maryam Archang
    The Egyptian Journal of Otolaryngology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Articles
Pulmonary
Awakening in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation
Su Hwan Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):26-34.   Published online February 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00031
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Although the rate of lung transplantation (LTx), the last treatment option for end-stage lung disease, is increasing, some patients waiting for LTx need a bridging strategy for LTx due to the limited number of available donor lungs. For a long time, mechanical ventilation has been employed as a bridge to LTx because the outcome of using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridging strategy has been poor. However, the outcome after mechanical ventilation as a bridge to LTx was poor compared with that in patients without bridges. With advances in technology and the accumulation of experience, the outcome of ECMO as a bridge to LTx has improved, and the rate of ECMO use as a bridging strategy has increased over time. However, whether the use of ECMO as a bridge to LTx can achieve survival rates similar to those of non-bridged LTx patients remains controversial. In 2010, one center introduced awake ECMO strategy for LTx bridging, and its use as a bridge to LTx has been showing favorable outcomes to date. Awake ECMO has several advantages, such as maintenance of physical activity, spontaneous breathing, avoidance of endotracheal intubation, and reduced use of sedatives and analgesics, but it may cause serious problems. Nonetheless, several studies have shown that awake ECMO performed by a multidisciplinary team is safe. In cases where ECMO or mechanical ventilation is required due to unavoidable exacerbation in patients awaiting LTx, the application of awake ECMO performed by an appropriately trained ECMO multi-disciplinary team can be useful.

Citations

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  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation: Practice patterns and patient outcomes
    Hannah J. Rando, Jonathon P. Fanning, Sung-Min Cho, Bo S. Kim, Glenn Whitman, Errol L. Bush, Steven P. Keller
    The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.2024; 43(1): 77.     CrossRef
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    Julien Fessler, Jaromir Vajter, Archer Kilbourne Martin
    Best Practice & Research Clinical Anaesthesiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Samuel Genzor, Pavol Pobeha, Martin Šimek, Petr Jakubec, Jan Mizera, Martin Vykopal, Milan Sova, Jakub Vaněk, Jan Praško
    Life.2023; 13(4): 1054.     CrossRef
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Neurosurgery
Brain-lung interaction: a vicious cycle in traumatic brain injury
Ariana Alejandra Chacón-Aponte, Érika Andrea Durán-Vargas, Jaime Adolfo Arévalo-Carrillo, Iván David Lozada-Martínez, Maria Paz Bolaño-Romero, Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Pedro Grille, Tariq Janjua
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):35-44.   Published online February 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01193
  • 14,743 View
  • 885 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The brain-lung interaction can seriously affect patients with traumatic brain injury, triggering a vicious cycle that worsens patient prognosis. Although the mechanisms of the interaction are not fully elucidated, several hypotheses, notably the “blast injury” theory or “double hit” model, have been proposed and constitute the basis of its development and progression. The brain and lungs strongly interact via complex pathways from the brain to the lungs but also from the lungs to the brain. The main pulmonary disorders that occur after brain injuries are neurogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia, and the principal brain disorders after lung injuries include brain hypoxia and intracranial hypertension. All of these conditions are key considerations for management therapies after traumatic brain injury and need exceptional case-by-case monitoring to avoid neurological or pulmonary complications. This review aims to describe the history, pathophysiology, risk factors, characteristics, and complications of brain-lung and lung-brain interactions and the impact of different old and recent modalities of treatment in the context of traumatic brain injury.

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ACC : Acute and Critical Care