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Nephrology
The Association of Preoperative Body Mass Index with Acute Kidney Injury in Liver Transplantation Recipients: A Retrospective Study
Ju Yeon Park, Jung-Hyun Park, Su Sung Lee, Hyun-Su Ri, Hye-jin Kim, Yun Mi Choi, Yoon Ji Choi, Ji-Uk Yoon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(3):265-274.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00178
  • 6,221 View
  • 106 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Liver transplantation (LT) is a complicated procedure with a high incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). Previous studies indicate that even transient or mild post-LT AKI can result in critical conditions, including prolonged stays in hospitals and intensive care units and increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and occurrence of AKI in LT recipients. Methods: Medical data from 203 patients who received LT surgery from January 2010 to August 2016 in a single university hospital setting were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Patients were classified as either underweight (BMI <20 kg/m2) or normal weight (20 ≤ BMI < 30 kg/m2). Demographic data, anesthetic methods, complications, and perioperative laboratory test values of each patient were assessed. Propensity analyses and logistic regression were performed to evaluate the association between BMI and post-LT AKI. Results: There was no significant difference in occurrence of post-LT AKI between underweight and normal weight patients. The underweight patient group had significantly longer hospital stay compared with the normal weight patient group (P = 0.023). Conclusions: BMI classification was neither a positive nor negative predictor of postoperative AKI occurrence. However, patients with lower BMI had significantly longer hospital stay compared with their counterparts. Although our study was limited by its retrospective design, our observations suggest that lower BMI might play a role in post-LT AKI.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of Body Mass Index and Acute Kidney Injury Incidence and Outcome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Jiarong Lan, Guangxing Xu, Yongfu Zhu, Congze Lin, Ziyou Yan, Sisi Shao
    Journal of Renal Nutrition.2023; 33(3): 397.     CrossRef
  • Association of overweight with postoperative acute kidney injury among patients receiving orthotopic liver transplantation: an observational cohort study
    Jian Zhou, Lin Lyu, Lin Zhu, Yongxin Liang, He Dong, Haichen Chu
    BMC Nephrology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Surgery
Clinical Outcome and Prognosis of Patients Admitted to the Surgical ICU after Abdomen Surgery
Yun Su Sim, Jin Hwa Lee, Jung Hyun Chang, Yon Ju Ryu
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2015;30(1):1-7.   Published online February 28, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2015.30.1.1
  • 7,293 View
  • 152 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Postoperative admission to the surgical intensive care unit (S-ICU) is commonly planned to prevent and treat complications, unnecessary admission to the S-ICU increases medical costs and length of hospital stay. This study aimed evaluated outcome and the predictive factors for mortality in patients admitted to the S-ICU after abdominal surgery. Methods: The 168 patients admitted to the S-ICU immediately after abdominal surgery were reviewed retrospectively from January to December 2011. Results: The mortality rate of patients admitted to the S-ICU after abdominal surgery was 8.9% (15 of 168). Two preoperative factors (body mass index [BMI] < 18.5 kg/m2 [p < 0.001] and serum albumin < 3.0 g/dL [p = 0.018]), two operative factors (the need for transfusion [p = 0.008] or vasopressors [p = 0.013] during surgery), and three postoperative variables (mechanical ventilation immediately following surgery [p < 0.001], sequential organ failure assessment [p = 0.001] and SAPS II [p = 0.001] score) were associated with mortality in univariate analysis. After adjusting for age, gender, and SAPS II by a Cox regression, which revealed that BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 (p < 0.001, hazard ratio [HR] 9.690, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.990-25.258) and the use of mechanical ventilation on admission to S-ICU (p < 0.001, HR 34.671, 95% CI 6.440-186.649) were independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: In patients in S-ICU after abdominal surgery, low BMI and postsurgical mechanical ventilation should be considered important predictors of mortality.

Citations

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  • The Effect of Organ System Surgery on Intensive Care Unit Mortality in a Cohort of Critically Ill Surgical Patients
    Anastasiya Shchatsko, Laura N. Purcell, Christopher J. Tignanelli, Anthony Charles
    The American Surgeon.2021; 87(8): 1230.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Predicting Delayed Ventilator Weaning after Lung Transplantation: The Role of Body Mass Index
Sarah Soh, Jin Ha Park, Jeong Min Kim, Min Jung Lee, Shin Ok Koh, Hyo Chae Paik, Moo Suk Park, Sungwon Na
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(4):273-280.   Published online November 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.4.273
  • 7,389 View
  • 68 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Weaning from mechanical ventilation is difficult in the intensive care unit (ICU). Many controversial questions remain unanswered concerning the predictors of weaning failure. This study investigates patient characteristics and delayed weaning after lung transplantation.
METHODS
This study retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 17 lung transplantation patients from October 2012 to December 2013. Patients able to be weaned from mechanical ventilation within 8 days after surgery were assigned to an early group (n = 9), and the rest of the patients were assigned to the delayed group (n=8). Patients' intraoperative and postoperative characteristics were collected and analyzed, and conventional weaning predictors, including rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI), were also assessed.
RESULTS
The results of the early group showed a significantly shorter ICU stay in addition to a shorter hospitalization overall. Notably, the early group had a higher body mass index (BMI) than the delayed group (20.7 vs. 16.9, p = 0.004). In addition, reopening occurred more frequently in the delayed group (1/9 vs. 5/8, p = 0.05). During spontaneous breathing trials, tidal volume (TV) and arterial oxygen tension were significantly higher in the early group compared to the delayed weaning group, but differences in RSBI and respiratory rate (RR) between groups were not statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS
Low BMI might be associated with delayed ventilator weaning in lung transplantation patients. In addition, instead of the traditional weaning predictors of RSBI and RR, TV might be a better predictor for ventilator weaning after lung transplantation.
Body Mass Index and Outcomes in Patients with Severe Sepsis or Septic Shock
Minjung Kathy Chae, Dae Jong Choi, Tae Gun Shin, Kyeongman Jeon, Gee Young Suh, Min Seob Sim, Keun Jeong Song, Yeon Kwon Jeong, Ik Joon Jo
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2013;28(4):266-271.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2013.28.4.266
  • 3,619 View
  • 53 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The aim of this study was to investigate the association between body mass index (BMI) and survival in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock.
METHODS
We analyzed the sepsis registry of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary urban hospital and meeting the criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock from August 2008 to March 2012. We categorized patients into the underweight group (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2), the normal weight group (18.5 < or = BMI < 25 kg/m2) and the obese group (BMI > or = 25 kg/m2). Then, we analyzed the registry to evaluate the relation between obesity and in-hospital mortality.
RESULTS
A total of 770 adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock were analyzed. In-hospital mortality rate of the underweight group (n = 86), the normal weight group (n = 489) and the obese group (n = 195) was 22.1%, 15.3% and 16.4%, respectively. In a multivariate regression analysis, the underweight group had a significant association with in-hospital mortality compared with the normal weight group (odds ratio [OR], 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68-1.87; p = 0.028). The obese group showed no significant difference in mortality (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.08-3.86; p = 0.65).
CONCLUSIONS
The underweight patients showed significantly higher mortality than the normal weight patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of body mass index with mortality of sepsis or septic shock: an updated meta-analysis
    Le Bai, Jingyi Huang, Dan Wang, Dongwei Zhu, Qi Zhao, Tingyuan Li, Xianmei Zhou, Yong Xu
    Journal of Intensive Care.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Necrotizing soft tissue infection: analysis of the factors related to mortality in 30 cases of a single institution for 5 years
    Sung Jin Park, Dong Heon Kim, Chang In Choi, Sung Pil Yun, Jae Hun Kim, Hyung Il Seo, Hong Jae Jo, Tae Yong Jun
    Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research.2016; 91(1): 45.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care