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Brief Communication
Intensivist/Policy
Experience of augmenting critical care capacity in Daegu during COVID-19 incident in South Korea
Je Hyeong Kim, Suk-Kyung Hong, Younghwan Kim, Ho Geol Ryu, Chi-Min Park, Young Seok Lee, Sung Jin Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(2):110-114.   Published online May 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00275
  • 6,114 View
  • 162 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Activities and Roles of Trauma Surgeons in the Treatment of COVID-19 Patients
    Younghwan Kim, Seok Hwa Youn
    Journal of Acute Care Surgery.2023; 13(2): 43.     CrossRef
  • Inhalation of Origanum majorana L. essential oil while working reduces perceived stress and anxiety levels of nurses in a COVID-19 intensive care unit: a randomized controlled trial
    Sang Wook Lee, You Kyoung Shin, Jeong-Min Lee, Geun Hee Seol
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What happened during the period from senior medical students’ withdrawal of their applications to take the Korean Medical Licensing Examination in August 2020 to their taking the licensing examination in February 2021
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 3.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of clinical characteristics and hospital mortality in critically ill patients without COVID-19 before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: a multicenter, retrospective, propensity score-matched study
    Sua Kim, Hangseok Choi, Jae Kyeom Sim, Won Jai Jung, Young Seok Lee, Je Hyeong Kim
    Annals of Intensive Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Correlation Between Third Dose of COVID-19 Vaccines and Regional Case Fatality Rates During the Omicron Wave in Korea
    Youngook Jang, In Joong Kim, Sung-Sil Moon, Sun Bean Kim, Jacob Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparity and the risk of contracting COVID-19 in South Korea: an NHIS-COVID-19 database cohort study
    Tak Kyu Oh, Jae-Wook Choi, In-Ae Song
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Intensive Care Unit Patient Load and Demand With Mortality Rates in US Department of Veterans Affairs Hospitals During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Dawn M. Bravata, Anthony J. Perkins, Laura J. Myers, Greg Arling, Ying Zhang, Alan J. Zillich, Lindsey Reese, Andrew Dysangco, Rajiv Agarwal, Jennifer Myers, Charles Austin, Ali Sexson, Samuel J. Leonard, Sharmistha Dev, Salomeh Keyhani
    JAMA Network Open.2021; 4(1): e2034266.     CrossRef
  • Impact of staffing model conversion from a mandatory critical care consultation model to a closed unit model in the medical intensive care unit
    Sung Jun Ko, Jaeyoung Cho, Sun Mi Choi, Young Sik Park, Chang-Hoon Lee, Chul-Gyu Yoo, Jinwoo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Robert Jeenchen Chen
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(10): e0259092.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Rapid response system
Rapid Response Systems Reduce In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest: A Pilot Study and Motivation for a Nationwide Survey
Yeonhee Park, Jong-Joon Ahn, Byung Ju Kang, Young Seok Lee, Sang-Ook Ha, Jin-Soo Min, Woo-Hyun Cho, Se-Hee Na, Dong-Hyun Lee, Seung-Yong Park, Goo-Hyeon Hong, Hyun-Jung Kim, Sangwoo Shim, Jung-Hyun Kim, Seok-Jeong Lee, So-Young Park, Jae Young Moon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(3):231-239.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00024
  • 8,095 View
  • 230 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Early recognition of the signs and symptoms of clinical deterioration could diminish the incidence of cardiopulmonary arrest. The present study investigates outcomes with respect to cardiopulmonary arrest rates in institutions with and without rapid response systems (RRSs) and the current level of cardiopulmonary arrest rate in tertiary hospitals. Methods: This was a retrospective study based on data from 14 tertiary hospitals. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rate reports were obtained from each hospital to include the number of cardiopulmonary arrest events in adult patients in the general ward, the annual adult admission statistics, and the structure of the RRS if present. Results: Hospitals with RRSs showed a statistically significant reduction of the CPR rate between 2013 and 2015 (odds ratio [OR], 0.731; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.577 to 0.927; P = 0.009). Nevertheless, CPR rates of 2013 and 2015 did not change in hospitals without RRS (OR, 0.988; 95% CI, 0.868 to 1.124; P = 0.854). National university-affiliated hospitals showed less cardiopulmonary arrest rate than private university-affiliated in 2015 (1.92 vs. 2.40; OR, 0.800; 95% CI, 0.702 to 0.912; P = 0.001). High-volume hospitals showed lower cardiopulmonary arrest rates compared with medium-volume hospitals in 2013 (1.76 vs. 2.63; OR, 0.667; 95% CI, 0.577 to 0.772; P < 0.001) and in 2015 (1.55 vs. 3.20; OR, 0.485; 95% CI, 0.428 to 0.550; P < 0.001). Conclusions: RRSs may be a feasible option to reduce the CPR rate. The discrepancy in cardiopulmonary arrest rates suggests further research should include a nationwide survey to tease out factors involved in in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest and differences in outcomes based on hospital characteristics.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Society of Critical Care Medicine Guidelines on Recognizing and Responding to Clinical Deterioration Outside the ICU: 2023
    Kimia Honarmand, Randy S. Wax, Daleen Penoyer, Geoffery Lighthall, Valerie Danesh, Bram Rochwerg, Michael L. Cheatham, Daniel P. Davis, Michael DeVita, James Downar, Dana Edelson, Alison Fox-Robichaud, Shigeki Fujitani, Raeann M. Fuller, Helen Haskell, Ma
    Critical Care Medicine.2024; 52(2): 314.     CrossRef
  • 2020 Korean Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Part 4. Adult advanced life support
    Jaehoon Oh, Kyoung-Chul Cha, Jong-Hwan Lee, Seungmin Park, Dong-Hyeok Kim, Byung Kook Lee, Jung Soo Park, Woo Jin Jung, Dong Keon Lee, Young Il Roh, Tae Youn Kim, Sung Phil Chung, Young-Min Kim, June Dong Park, Han-Suk Kim, Mi Jin Lee, Sang-Hoon Na, Gyu C
    Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine.2021; 8(S): S26.     CrossRef
  • Intensivists' Direct Management without Residents May Improve the Survival Rate Compared to High-Intensity Intensivist Staffing in Academic Intensive Care Units: Retrospective and Crossover Study Design
    Jin Hyoung Kim, Jihye Kim, SooHyun Bae, Taehoon Lee, Jong-Joon Ahn, Byung Ju Kang
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Influence of the Rapid Response Team Activation via Screening by Nurses on Unplanned Intensive Care Unit Admissions
    Ye-Ji Huh, Seongmi Moon, Eun Kyeung Song, Minyoung Kim
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2020; 32(5): 539.     CrossRef
  • Rapid response systems in Korea
    Bo Young Lee, Sang-Bum Hong
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(2): 108.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
The Ability of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) IV Score to Predict Mortality in a Single Tertiary Hospital
Jae Woo Choi, Young Sun Park, Young Seok Lee, Yeon Hee Park, Chaeuk Chung, Dong Il Park, In Sun Kwon, Ju Sang Lee, Na Eun Min, Jeong Eun Park, Sang Hoon Yoo, Gyu Rak Chon, Young Hoon Sul, Jae Young Moon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(3):275-283.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00990
  • 16,574 View
  • 402 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II model has been widely used in Korea. However, there have been few studies on the APACHE IV model in Korean intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to compare the ability of APACHE IV and APACHE II in predicting hospital mortality, and to investigate the ability of APACHE IV as a critical care triage criterion. Methods: The study was designed as a prospective cohort study. Measurements of discrimination and calibration were performed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test respectively. We also calculated the standardized mortality ratio (SMR). Results: The APACHE IV score, the Charlson Comorbidity index (CCI) score, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and unplanned ICU admissions were independently associated with hospital mortality. The calibration, discrimination, and SMR of APACHE IV were good (H = 7.67, P = 0.465; C = 3.42, P = 0.905; AUROC = 0.759; SMR = 1.00). However, the explanatory power of an APACHE IV score >93 alone on hospital mortality was low at 44.1%. The explanatory power was increased to 53.8% when the hospital mortality was predicted using a model that considers APACHE IV >93 scores, medical admission, and risk factors for CCI >3 coincidentally. However, the discriminative ability of the prediction model was unsatisfactory (C index <0.70). Conclusions: The APACHE IV presented good discrimination, calibration, and SMR for hospital mortality.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Circadian rhythms of vital signs are associated with in-hospital mortality in critically ill patients: A retrospective observational study
    Zhengning Yang, Xiaoxia Xie, Xu Zhang, Lan Li, Ruoxue Bai, Hui Long, Yanna Ma, Zhenliang Hui, Yujie Qi, Jun Chen
    Chronobiology International.2023; 40(3): 262.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and outcomes of patients admitted to adult intensive care units in Hong Kong: a population retrospective cohort study from 2008 to 2018
    Lowell Ling, Chun Ming Ho, Pauline Yeung Ng, King Chung Kenny Chan, Hoi Ping Shum, Cheuk Yan Chan, Alwin Wai Tak Yeung, Wai Tat Wong, Shek Yin Au, Kit Hung Anne Leung, Jacky Ka Hing Chan, Chi Keung Ching, Oi Yan Tam, Hin Hung Tsang, Ting Liong, Kin Ip Law
    Journal of Intensive Care.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation and Validation of Four Scoring Systems: the APACHE IV, SAPS III, MPM0 II, and ICMM in Critically Ill Cancer Patients

    Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2020; 24(4): 263.     CrossRef
Case Report
Genetic
Lethal Hyperammonemia due to Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency in a Patient with Severe Septic Shock
Ji An Hwang, Joo Han Song, Young Seok Lee, Kyung Soo Chung, Song Yee Kim, Eun Young Kim, Ji Ye Jung, Young Ae Kang, Young Sam Kim, Joon Chang, Moo Suk Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(2):140-145.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.140
  • 7,364 View
  • 83 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Severe hyperammonemia can occur as a result of inherited or acquired liver enzyme defects in the urea cycle, among which ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common form. We report a very rare case of a 45-year-old Korean male who was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to severe septic shock with acute respiratory failure caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. During his ICU stay with ventilator care, the patient suffered from marked hyperammonemia (>1,700 μg/dL) with abrupt mental change leading to life-threatening cerebral edema. Despite every effort including continuous renal replacement therapy and use of a molecular adsorbent recirculating system (extracorporeal liver support–albumin dialysis) to lower his serum ammonia level, the patient was not recovered. The lethal hyperammonemia in the patient was later proven to be a manifestation of acquired liver enzyme defect known as OTCD, which is triggered by serious catabolic conditions, such as severe septic shock with acute respiratory failure.
Original Article
Usefulness of Screening Criteria System Used by Medical Alert Team in a General Hospital
Hyejin Joo, So Hee Park, Sang Bum Hong, Chae Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Young Seok Lee, Jin Won Huh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2012;27(3):151-156.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2012.27.3.151
  • 3,143 View
  • 61 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Rapid response team (RRT) is becoming an essential part of patient safety by the early recognition and management of patients on general hospital wards. In this study, we analyzed the usefulness of screening criteria of RRT used at Asan Medical Center.
METHODS
On a retrospective basis, we reviewed the records of 675 cases in 543 patients that were managed by RRT (called medical alert team in the Asan Medical Center), from July 2011 to December 2011. The medical alert team was acted by requests of attending doctors or nurses or the medical alert system (MAS) criteria composed of abnormal vital sign, neurology, laboratory data and increasing oxygen demand. We investigated the patterns of MAS criteria for targeting the patients who were managed by the medical alert team.
RESULTS
Respiratory distress (RR > 25/min) was the most common item for identifying patients whose condition had worsened. The criteria consist with respiratory distress and abnormal blood pressure (mean BP < 60 mmHg or systolic BP < 90 mmHg) found 70.0% of patients with deteriorated conditions. Vital sign (RR > 25/min, mean BP < 60 mmHg or systolic BP < 90 mmHg, pulse rate, PR > 130/min or < 50/min) and oxygen demand found 79.2% of them. Vital signs, arterial blood gas analysis (ABGA) with lactate level (pH, pO2, pCO2, and lactate) and O2 demand found 98.6% of patient conditions had worsened.
CONCLUSIONS
Vital signs, especially RR > 25/min is useful criteria for detecting patients whose conditions have deteriorated. The addition of ABGA data with lactate levels leads to a more powerful screening tool.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Influence of the Rapid Response Team Activation via Screening by Nurses on Unplanned Intensive Care Unit Admissions
    Ye-Ji Huh, Seongmi Moon, Eun Kyeung Song, Minyoung Kim
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2020; 32(5): 539.     CrossRef
  • Early Experience of Medical Alert System in a Rural Training Hospital: a Pilot Study
    Maru Kim
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2017; 32(1): 47.     CrossRef
  • Temporal patterns of change in vital signs and Cardiac Arrest Risk Triage scores over the 48 hours preceding fatal in‐hospital cardiac arrest
    HyunSoo Oh, KangIm Lee, WhaSook Seo
    Journal of Advanced Nursing.2016; 72(5): 1122.     CrossRef
  • A combination of early warning score and lactate to predict intensive care unit transfer of inpatients with severe sepsis/septic shock
    Jung-Wan Yoo, Ju Ry Lee, Youn Kyung Jung, Sun Hui Choi, Jeong Suk Son, Byung Ju Kang, Tai Sun Park, Jin-Won Huh, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Sang Bum Hong
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2015; 30(4): 471.     CrossRef
Case Report
A Case of iLA Application in a Patient with Refractory Asthma Who Is Nonresponsive to Conventional Mechanical Ventilation: A Case Report
Young Seok Lee, Hyejin Joo, Jae Young Moon, Jin Won Huh, Yeon Mok Oh, Chae Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Sang Bum Hong
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2012;27(2):108-110.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2012.27.2.108
  • 2,685 View
  • 52 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Refractory asthma with hypercapnia is a near-fatal disease. Pumpless Extracorporeal Interventional Lung Assist (iLA) may be considered as an alternative therapy for the disease as it removes the carbon dioxide effectively. Nevertheless, clinical outcome studies regarding iLA in patients suffering from refractory asthma have rarely been applied. Here, we reported our experience with iLA for the treatment of refractory asthma with hypercapnia. In our case, the patient had refractory asthma which was not controlled with medical treatment or mechanical ventilation. We applied iLA since hypercapnia was not resolved despite mechanical ventilation. After iLA implantation effectively reduced the carbon dioxide, the clinical condition of our patient improved. In conclusion, iLA is a useful tool for patient suffering from refractory asthma with hypercapnia.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Interventional lung assist and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a patient with near-fatal asthma
    Seok Jeong Lee, Yong Sung Cha, Chun Sung Byun, Sang-Ha Kim, Myoung Kyu Lee, Suk Joong Yong, Won-Yeon Lee
    The American Journal of Emergency Medicine.2017; 35(2): 374.e3.     CrossRef
  • Pumpless extracorporeal interventional lung assist for bronchiolitis obliterans after allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acute lymphocytic leukemia
    Yeon-Hee Park, Chae-Uk Chung, Jae-Woo Choi, Sang-Ok Jung, Sung-Soo Jung, Jeong-Eun Lee, Ju-Ock Kim, Jae-Young Moon
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2015; 32(2): 98.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Effectiveness of Left Infrascapular Skin Temperature Monitoring in the ICU
Young Joo Lee, Hyun Jue Gill, Kuem Hee Chung, Jeong Yeon Hong, Bong Ki Moon, Myoung Eun Kim, Min Hyup Choi, Young Seok Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 1998;13(2):229-233.
  • 1,564 View
  • 5 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGOUND: Many sites are used to measure the body temperature and each site has different physiologic and practical importance. Several types of skin temperature monitoring have been used as simple, inexpensive and viable alternatives in many settings. In the operating area, it is difficult to insert a temperature probe during operation. The object of this study was to compare the difference and the correlation between the temperature of the left infrascapular skin region and temperatures of axilla, nasopharynx and rectum, METHODS: Forty-two adult patients who were admitted at surgical ICU were studied. After covering the bed with insulator and sheets, patients were placed in supine position. Temperature monitoring was done at the same time using four temperature probes from two bedside patient monitors in the same patient. The temperatures were measured twice at 30 minutes after application of the temperature probe at 10 minute intervals and the average temperature was recorded.
RESULTS
The differences between skin temperature and rectal, nasopharyngeal, and axillary temperatures were -0.64+/-0.21degrees C (p<0.05), -0.40+/-0.21degrees C, and 0.24+/-0.21degrees C respectively. The lineal correlation between skin temperature and rectal, nasopharyngeal, and axillary temperatures were 0.839, 0.854, and 0.819, respectively (p<0.001).
CONCLUSION
This study suggests that the monitoring of the skin temperature at the left infrascapular skin region is well correlated with the nasopharyngeal, rectal and axillary temperatures. And it will be an easy, simple and safe method which can be used for the patients who are alert but need continuous temperature monitoring in the intensive care unit and as well as for the patients who are in the middle of operation.
Volume Changes under Isotonic Condition Containing Thiopental in Brain Astrocytoma Cells
Young Seok Lee, Bong Ki Moon, Sang Gun Han, Young Joo Lee, Jeong Yeon Hong, Kyeong Jin Lee, Soo Han Yoon, Keum Hee Chung, Hyun Jue Gill
Korean J Crit Care Med. 1998;13(2):194-197.
  • 1,542 View
  • 4 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGOUND: Cell volume regulation is especially important in the brain because the brain is confined within a non-compliant vault and cannot tolerate significant perturbations in cell size. Cerebral cell volume regulation mechanisms are activated by sustained disturbances in plasma osmolality. The constancy of cell volume under physiological conditions is generally thought to reflex a balance between influx and efflux of solute and is therefore critically dependent on the properties of the plasma membrane. Cell volume regulation have not been described under isoosmotic solution. The object of the study was to know the effects of thiopental on cell volume change in isoosmotic condition.
METHODS
We made isoosmotic solution without thiopental (Group 1) and isoosmotic solution with 22.9 mM (Group 2), 16.8 mM (Group 3), 13.3 mM (Group 4) thiopental, separately, in order to study changes in cell volume under isoosmotic solution. We put cultured human brain astrocytoma cells into isoosmotic solution for each group and calculated cell volume using Coulter Counter after 30 minutes.
RESULTS
Cell volume was shown to be 5084+/-8580 (micrometer3)in Group 1, 501+/-854 (micrometer3) in Group 2, 1183+/-3839 (micrometer3) in Group 3, and 624+/-1100 (micrometer3) in Group 4. We discovered that cells in Group 2,3,4 were shrunk relative to cells in Group 1 (p<0.01). And there were significant differences in cell volume among thiopental groups.
CONCLUSIONS
Thiopental may has an effect on cell membrane properties and decrease cell volume under isoosmotic solution in brain astrocytoma cell.
The Effect of Cervical Sympathetic Nerve Block on Blood-brain Barrier Disruption with Mannitol Infusion in Rats
Bong Ki Moon, Soo Han Yoon, Young Joo Lee, Chul Ryung Hur, Chang Ho Kim, Sung Jung Lee, Young Seok Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 1997;12(1):69-74.
  • 1,588 View
  • 19 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGOUND: The barrier can be altered by a number of insults to the brain (e.g., hypertension, freezing, trauma, drug). But the effect of the blood brain barrier distruction immediately after the neural change is unknown. In the present study, we focused on the BBBD after cervical sympathetic chain block.
METHODS
13 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 (N=7) was blocked with 0.5% bupivacaine on the right cervical sympathetic chain and group 2 (N=6) was blocked with 0.5% bupivacaine on the bilateral cervical sympathetic chain. All rats received 37degrees C, 25% mannitol (1.75 g/kg) via right carotid artery and then, the effect of cervical sympathetic chain block on blood-brain barrier disruption of four cerebral compartment using 99mTc-human serum albumin and Evans blue was evaluated.
RESULTS
Both groups showed blood-brain barrier disruption and there was no significant difference between group 1 and group 2 in the anterior and posterior hemisphere of the right side brain. But group 2 showed significant blood-brain barrier disruption than group 1 in anterior and posterior hemisphere of the left brain (p<0.01).
CONCLUSIONS
This results suggest that cervical sympathetic chain block can increase the degree of mannitol-induced blood-brain barrier disruption via neural arch or blood flow change.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care