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16 "Sang-Bum Hong"
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Original Articles
Pulmonary
Incidence and risk factors associated with progression to severe pneumonia among adults with non-severe Legionella pneumonia
Jin-Young Huh, Sang-Ho Choi, Kyung-Wook Jo, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Tae Sun Shim, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):543-549.   Published online October 21, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00521
  • 2,452 View
  • 102 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Legionella species are important causative organisms of severe pneumonia. However, data are limited on predictors of progression to severe Legionella pneumonia (LP). Therefore, the risk factors for LP progression from non-severe to the severe form were investigated in the present study. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study that included adult LP patients admitted to a 2,700-bed referral center between January 2005 and December 2019. Results: A total of 155 patients were identified during the study period; 58 patients (37.4%) initially presented with severe pneumonia and 97 (62.6%) patients with non-severe pneumonia. Among the 97 patients, 28 (28.9%) developed severe pneumonia during hospitalization and 69 patients (71.1%) recovered without progression to severe pneumonia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed platelet count ≤150,000/mm3 (odds ratio [OR], 2.923; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.100–8.105; P=0.034) and delayed antibiotic treatment >1 day (OR, 3.092; 95% CI, 1.167–8.727; P=0.026) were significant independent factors associated with progression to severe pneumonia. Conclusions: A low platelet count and delayed antibiotic treatment were significantly associated with the progression of non-severe LP to severe LP.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Atraumatic Splenic Rupture in Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia
    Elliott Worku, Dominic Adam Worku, Salim Surani
    Case Reports in Infectious Diseases.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • Short- and long-term prognosis of patients with community-acquired Legionella or pneumococcal pneumonia diagnosed by urinary antigen testing
    Leyre Serrano, Luis Alberto Ruiz, Silvia Perez-Fernandez, Pedro Pablo España, Ainhoa Gomez, Beatriz Gonzalez, Ane Uranga, Sonia Castro, Milagros Iriberri, Rafael Zalacain
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2023; 134: 106.     CrossRef
  • Case report: Fatal Legionella infection diagnosed via by metagenomic next-generation sequencing in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia
    Chunhong Bu, Shuai Lei, Linguang Chen, Yanqiu Xie, Guoli Zheng, Liwei Hua
    Frontiers in Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pediatrics
Characteristics and prognostic factors of very elderly patients admitted to the intensive care unit
Song-I Lee, Younsuck Koh, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):372-381.   Published online August 4, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00066
  • 3,486 View
  • 228 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Korea is rapidly becoming a super aging society and is facing the increased burden of critical care for the elderly people. Traditionally, far-advanced age has been regarded as a triage criterion for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We evaluated how the characteristics and prognostic factors of very elderly patients (≥85 years) admitted to the ICU changed over the last decade.
Methods
We retrospectively evaluated the data of patients admitted to the ICU over 11 years (2007–2017). The clinical characteristics and outcomes of the very elderly-patients group were evaluated. Factors associated with mortality were assessed by a cox regression analysis.
Results
Comparing the first half (2007–2012) and the second half (2013–2017) of the study period, the proportion of very elderly group increased from 603/47,657 (1.3%), to 697/37,756 (1.8%) (P<0.001). Among 1,294 very elderly patients, 1,274 patients were analyzed excluding hopeless discharge (n=20). The non-surgical reasons for ICU admission (67.0% vs. 76.1%, P<0.001) and the percentage of patients with co-morbidities (78.3% vs. 82.7%, P=0.048) were increased. Nevertheless, the hospital mortality decreased (21.3% vs. 14.9%, P=0.001). High creatinine levels, use of vasopressors and ventilator weaning failure were associated with in-hospital mortality.
Conclusions
The proportion of very elderly people in the ICU increased over the last decade. The non-surgical causes of ICU admission increased compared with the surgical causes. Despite an increasement in ICU admissions of very elderly patients, in-hospital mortality of very elderly ICU patients decreased.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Chronicles of change for the future: The imperative of continued data collection in French ICUs
    Takashi Tagami
    Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine.2023; 42(5): 101294.     CrossRef
  • We need a comprehensive intensive care unit management strategy for older patients
    Dong-Ick Shin
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(3): 468.     CrossRef
Ethics
Outcomes of critically ill patients according to the perception of intensivists on the appropriateness of intensive care unit admission
Youjin Chang, Kyoung Ran Kim, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(4):351-360.   Published online November 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00283
  • 4,888 View
  • 135 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
It is important for intensivists to determine which patient may benefit from intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We aimed to assess the outcomes of patients perceived as non-beneficially or beneficially admitted to the ICU and evaluate whether their prognosis was consistent with the intensivists’ perception.
Methods
A prospective observational study was conducted on patients admitted to the medical ICU of a tertiary referral center between February and April 2014. The perceptions of four intensivists at admission (day 1) and on day 3 were investigated as non-beneficial admission, beneficial admission, or indeterminate state.
Results
A total of 210 patients were enrolled. On days 1 and 3, 22 (10%) and 23 (11%) patients were judged as having non-beneficial admission; 166 (79%) and 159 (79%), beneficial admission; and 22 (10%) and 21 (10%), indeterminate state, respectively. The ICU mortality rates of each group were 64%, 22%, and 57%, respectively; their 6-month mortality rates were 100%, 46%, and 81%, respectively. The perceptions of non-beneficial admission or indeterminate state were the significant predictors of ICU mortality (day 3, odds ratio [OR], 4.049; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.892–8.664; P<0.001) and 6-month mortality (day 1: OR, 4.983; 95% CI, 1.260–19.703; P=0.022; day 3: OR, 4.459; 95% CI, 1.162–17.121; P=0.029).
Conclusions
The outcomes of patients perceived as having non-beneficial admission were extremely poor. The intensivists’ perception was important in predicting patients’ outcomes and was more consistent with long-term prognosis than with immediate outcomes. The intensivists’ role can be reflected in limited ICU resource utilization.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characteristics of critically ill patients with cancer associated with intensivist's perception of inappropriateness of ICU admission: A retrospective cohort study
    Carla Marchini Dias da Silva, Bruno Adler Maccagnan Pinheiro Besen, Antônio Paulo Nassar Jr
    Journal of Critical Care.2024; 79: 154468.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics, ICU Interventions, and Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Palliative Care Triggers in a Mixed Community-Based Intensive Care Unit
    Michele M. Iguina, Aunie M. Danyalian, Ilko Luque, Umair Shaikh, Sanaz B. Kashan, Dionne Morgan, Daniel Heller, Mauricio Danckers
    Journal of Palliative Care.2023; 38(2): 126.     CrossRef
  • Association of appropriateness for ICU admission with resource use, organ support and long-term survival in critically ill cancer patients
    Carla Marchini Dias Silva, Janaina Naiara Germano, Anna Karolyne de Araujo Costa, Giovanna Alves Gennari, Pedro Caruso, Antonio Paulo Nassar Jr
    Internal and Emergency Medicine.2023; 18(4): 1191.     CrossRef
  • Can the intensivists predict the outcomes of critically ill patients on the appropriateness of intensive care unit admission for limited intensive care unit resources ?
    SeungYong Park
    Acute and Critical Care.2021; 36(4): 388.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Effects of high-flow nasal cannula in patients with mild to moderate hypercapnia: a prospective observational study
Kyung Hun Nam, Hyung Koo Kang, Sung-Soon Lee, So-Hee Park, Sung Wook Kang, Jea Jun Hwang, So Young Park, Won Young Kim, Hee Jung Suh, Eun Young Kim, Ga Jin Seo, Younsuck Koh, Sang-Bum Hong, Jin Won Huh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):249-255.   Published online July 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.01102
  • 6,005 View
  • 245 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Evidence for using high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in hypercapnia is still limited. Most of the clinical studies had been conducted retrospectively, and there had been conflicting reports for the effects of HFNC on hypercapnia correction in prospective studies. Therefore, more evidence is needed to understand the effect of the HFNC in hypercapnia.
Methods
We conducted a multicenter prospective observational study after applying HFNC to 45 hospitalized subjects who had moderate hypercapnia (arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide [PaCO2], 43–70 mm Hg) without severe respiratory acidosis (pH <7.30). The primary outcome was a change in PaCO2 level in the first 24 hours of HFNC use. The secondary outcomes were changes in other parameters of arterial blood gas analysis, changes in respiration rates, and clinical outcomes.
Results
There was a significant decrease in PaCO2 in the first hour of HFNC application (-3.80 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -6.35 to -1.24; P<0.001). Reduction of PaCO2 was more prominent in subjects who did not have underlying obstructive lung disease. There was a correction in pH, but no significant changes in respiratory rate, bicarbonate, and arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio. Mechanical ventilation was not required for 93.3% (42/45) of our study population.
Conclusions
We suggest that HFNC could be a safe alternative for oxygen delivery in hypercapnia patients who do not need immediate mechanical ventilation. With HFNC oxygenation, correction of hypercapnia could be expected, especially in patients who do not have obstructive lung diseases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Safety and efficacy of high flow nasal canula in patients with mild hypercapnia
    Mohammed A. Ibrahim, Magdy Emara, Mohammed Shehta
    The Egyptian Journal of Bronchology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current status of treatment of acute respiratory failure in Korea
    Yong Jun Choi, Jae Hwa Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 124.     CrossRef
  • High-flow nasal cannula: Evaluation of the perceptions of various performance aspects among Chinese clinical staff and establishment of a multidimensional clinical evaluation system
    Ruoxuan Wen, Xingshuo Hu, Tengchen Wei, Kaifei Wang, Zhimei Duan, Zhanqi Zhao, Lixin Xie, Fei Xie
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Application Progress of HFNC in Respiratory Diseases
    迪 吴
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2022; 12(11): 10617.     CrossRef
Erratum
Pulmonary
Erratum to “Global and regional ventilation during high flow nasal cannula in patients with hypoxia”
Dong Hyun Lee, Eun Young Kim, Ga Jin Seo, Hee Jung Suh, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(2):173-173.   Published online May 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2017.00507.e1
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2018;33(1):7
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  • 64 Download
PDF
Review Article
Rapid response system
Rapid response systems in Korea
Bo Young Lee, Sang-Bum Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(2):108-116.   Published online May 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00535
  • 11,731 View
  • 394 Download
  • 21 Web of Science
  • 22 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The inpatient treatment process is becoming more and more complicated with advanced treatments, aging of the patient population, and multiple comorbidities. During the process, patients often experience unexpected deterioration, about half of which might be preventable. Early identification of patient deterioration and the proper response are priorities in most healthcare facilities. A rapid response system (RRS) is a safety net to identify antecedents of these adverse events and to respond in a timely manner. The RRS has become an essential part of the medical system worldwide, supported by all major quality improvement organizations. An RRS consists of a trigger system and response team and needs constant assessment and process improvement. Although the effectiveness and cost-benefit of RRS remain controversial, according to previous studies, it may be beneficial by decreasing in-hospital cardiac arrest and mortality. Since the first implementation of RRS in Korea in 2008, it has been developed in over 15 medical centers and continues to expand. Recent accreditation standards and an RRS pilot program by the Korean government will promote the proliferation of RRSs in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between the timing of ICU admission and mortality in patients with hospital-onset sepsis: a nationwide prospective cohort study
    Yoon Hae Ahn, Jinwoo Lee, Dong Kyu Oh, Su Yeon Lee, Mi Hyeon Park, Haein Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Sang-Min Lee, Hong Yeul Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Sang-Bum Hong, Dong Kyu Oh, Gee Young Suh, Kyeongman Jeon, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Young-Jae Cho, Yeon Joo Lee, Sung Yoon Lim, Su
    Journal of Intensive Care.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Findings from a decade of experience following implementation of a Rapid Response System into an Asian hospital
    Augustine Tee, Bryan Peide Choo, Roshni Sadashiv Gokhale, Xiqin Wang, Mashithah Mansor, Hong Choon Oh, Daryl Jones
    Resuscitation Plus.2023; 16: 100461.     CrossRef
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    Youn-Hui Won, Jiyeon Kang
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing.2022; 68: 103136.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and outcomes of patients screened by rapid response team who transferred to the intensive care unit
    Song-I. Lee, Jeong Suk Koh, Yoon Joo Kim, Da Hyun Kang, Jeong Eun Lee
    BMC Emergency Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mortality of patients with hospital-onset sepsis in hospitals with all-day and non-all-day rapid response teams: a prospective nationwide multicenter cohort study
    Dong-gon Hyun, Su Yeon Lee, Jee Hwan Ahn, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim, Dong Kyu Oh, Gee Young Suh, Kyeongman Jeon, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Young-Jae Cho, Yeon Joo Lee, Sung Yoon Lim, Sunghoon Park, Jeongwon Heo, Jae-myeong Lee, Kyung Cha
    Critical Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Korean nurses’ perception and performance on communication with physicians in clinical deterioration
    Bo-Gyeong Jin, Kyoungrim Kang, Hyun-Jin Cho
    Medicine.2022; 101(38): e30570.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Nurses’ Intention to Use Defibrillators in South Korea: A Path Analysis
    Dongchoon Uhm, Gye-Hyun Jung
    Healthcare.2022; 11(1): 61.     CrossRef
  • Rapid Response System Should Be Enhanced at Non-general Ward Locations: a Retrospective Multicenter Cohort Study in Korea
    Byung Ju Kang, Sang-Bum Hong, Kyeongman Jeon, Sang-Min Lee, Dong Hyun Lee, Jae Young Moon, Yeon Joo Lee, Jung Soo Kim, Jisoo Park, Jong-Joon Ahn
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of hospitalization duration before medical emergency team activation: A retrospective cohort study
    Jinmi Lee, Yujung Shin, Eunjoo Choi, Sunhui Choi, Jeongsuk Son, Youn Kyung Jung, Sang-Bum Hong, Tai-Heng Chen
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(2): e0247066.     CrossRef
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    Yeon Joo Lee, Kyung-Jae Cho, Oyeon Kwon, Hyunho Park, Yeha Lee, Joon-Myoung Kwon, Jinsik Park, Jung Soo Kim, Man-Jong Lee, Ah Jin Kim, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Kyeongman Jeon, You Hwan Jo
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    Sang Hyuk Kim, Ji Young Hong, Youlim Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Sang Hyuk Kim, Hye Suk Choi, Eun Suk Jin, Hayoung Choi, Hyun Lee, Sang-Hwa Lee, Chang Youl Lee, Myung Goo Lee, Youlim Kim
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Korean Journal of Clinical Geriatrics.2021; 22(2): 67.     CrossRef
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    Soo-Jeong Kim, Ji Woong Roh, Sungwon Kim, Jin Young Park, Donghoon Choi
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    Youngjoon Kang
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(3): 173.     CrossRef
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Original Article
Pulmonary
Use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with acute high-risk pulmonary embolism: a case series with literature review
You Na Oh, Dong Kyu Oh, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim, Jin-Won Huh, Jae Seung Lee, Sung-Ho Jung, Pil-Je Kang, Sang-Bum Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(2):148-154.   Published online May 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00500
  • 7,168 View
  • 219 Download
  • 20 Web of Science
  • 21 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Although extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been used for the treatment of acute high-risk pulmonary embolism (PE), there are limited reports which focus on this approach. Herein, we described our experience with ECMO in patients with acute high-risk PE.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients diagnosed with acute highrisk PE and treated with ECMO between January 2014 and December 2018.
Results
Among 16 patients included, median age was 51 years (interquartile range [IQR], 38 to 71 years) and six (37.5%) were male. Cardiac arrest was occurred in 12 (75.0%) including two cases of out-of-hospital arrest. All patients underwent veno-arterial ECMO and median ECMO duration was 1.5 days (IQR, 0.0 to 4.5 days). Systemic thrombolysis and surgical embolectomy were performed in seven (43.8%) and nine (56.3%) patients, respectively including three patients (18.8%) received both treatments. Overall 30-day mortality rate was 43.8% (95% confidence interval, 23.1% to 66.8%) and 30-day mortality rates according to the treatment groups were ECMO alone (33.3%, n=3), ECMO with thrombolysis (50.0%, n=4) and ECMO with embolectomy (44.4%, n=9).
Conclusions
Despite the vigorous treatment efforts, patients with acute high-risk PE were related to substantial morbidity and mortality. We report our experience of ECMO as rescue therapy for refractory shock or cardiac arrest in patients with PE.

Citations

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    Samir Ali, Christiaan L. Meuwese, Xavier J. R. Moors, Dirk W. Donker, Anina F. van de Koolwijk, Marcel C. G. van de Poll, Diederik Gommers, Dinis Dos Reis Miranda
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    Maxwell A. Hockstein, Christina Creel-Bulos, Joshua Appelstein, Craig S. Jabaley, Michael J. Stentz
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Case Reports
Pulmonary
Right ventricular assist device with an oxygenator using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation in a patient with severe respiratory failure and right heart decompensation
Dong Kyu Oh, Tae Sun Shim, Kyung-Wook Jo, Seung-Il Park, Dong Kwan Kim, Sehoon Choi, Geun Dong Lee, Sung-Ho Jung, Pil-Je Kang, Sang-Bum Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(2):117-121.   Published online April 8, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00416
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Right heart decompensation is a fatal complication in patients with respiratory failure, particularly in those transitioned to lung transplantation using veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-V ECMO). In these patients, veno-arterial (V-A ECMO) or veno-arterialvenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-AV ECMO) is used to support both cardiac and respiratory function. However, these processes may increase the risk of device-related complications such as bleeding, thromboembolism, and limb ischemia. In the present case, a 64-year-old male patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis developed respiratory failure and commenced treatment with V-V ECMO as a bridge to lung transplantation. Unfortunately, the patient developed right heart decompensation and required both cardiac and respiratory support during treatment with V-V ECMO. Instead of adding arterial cannulation, he was switched to a novel configuration, a right ventricular assist device with an oxygenator (Oxy- RVAD) using ECMO, with drainage cannulation from the femoral vein and return cannulation to the main pulmonary artery. The patient was successfully bridged to lung transplantation without serious complications after 10 days of Oxy-RVAD support. To the best of our knowledge, this is an extreme rare and challenging case of Oxy-RVAD using ECMO in a patient successfully bridged to lung transplantation.

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    John Arthur McClung, William H. Frishman, Wilbert S. Aronow
    Cardiology in Review.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Percutaneous Venopulmonary Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as Bridge to Lung Transplantation
    Asad Ali Usman, Audrey Elizabeth Spelde, Wasim Lutfi, Jacob T. Gutsche, William J. Vernick, Omar Toubat, Salim E. Olia, Edward Cantu, Andrew Courtright, Maria M. Crespo, Joshua Diamond, Mauer Biscotti, Christian A. Bermudez
    ASAIO Journal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Right Ventricular Assist Device with an Oxygenator for the Management of Combined Right Ventricular and Respiratory Failure: A Systematic Review.
    Juliette Beaulieu, Christine Vu, Sanjog Kalra, Hamza Ouazani Chahdi, Julie Cousineau, Alexis Matteau, Samer Mansour, E. Marc Jolicoeur, Sabrina Jacques, Bénédicte Nauche, Renata Podbielski, Pasquale Ferraro, Charles Poirier, Brian J. Potter
    Canadian Journal of Cardiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Early Mobilization for a Patient With a Right Ventricular Assist Device With an Oxygenator
    Sheena MacFarlane, Vanessa Lee, Adrienne H. Simonds, Samantha Alvarez, Samantha Carty, Kevin H. Ewers, Victoria R. Kelly, Parker Linden, Amanda L. Moskal
    Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy.2023; 14(1): 45.     CrossRef
  • A 35-month-old boy who ingested laundry detergent pods and underwent veno-pulmonary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support
    Hye-ji Han, Bongjin Lee, Won Jin Jang, Ji Won Lee, Jin Hee Kim, Sungkyu Cho, June Dong Park
    Pediatric Emergency Medicine Journal.2023; 10(4): 175.     CrossRef
  • Right Ventricular Assist Device With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Bridging Right Ventricular Heart Failure to Lung Transplantation: A Single-Center Case Series and Literature Review
    Jae Guk Lee, Chuiyong Pak, Dong Kyu Oh, Ho Cheol Kim, Pil-Je Kang, Geun Dong Lee, Se Hoon Choi, Sung-Ho Jung, Sang-Bum Hong
    Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia.2022; 36(6): 1686.     CrossRef
  • Advanced Circulatory Support and Lung Transplantation in Pulmonary Hypertension
    Marie M. Budev, James J. Yun
    Cardiology Clinics.2022; 40(1): 129.     CrossRef
  • A Review of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Treatment in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Case Series of Adult Patients
    Heather Torbic, Benjamin Hohlfelder, Sudhir Krishnan, Adriano R. Tonelli
    Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics.2022; 27: 107424842110690.     CrossRef
  • A Comprehensive Review of Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices
    Varunsiri Atti, Mahesh Anantha Narayanan, Brijesh Patel, Sudarshan Balla, Aleem Siddique, Scott Lundgren, Poonam Velagapudi
    Heart International.2022; 16(1): 37.     CrossRef
  • Comprehensive Monitoring in Patients With Dual Lumen Right Atrium to Pulmonary Artery Right Ventricular Assist Device
    Asad A. Usman, Audrey E. Spelde, Michael Ibrahim, Marisa Cevasco, Christian Bermudez, Emily MacKay, Sameer Khandhar, Wilson Szeto, William Vernick, Jacob Gutsche
    ASAIO Journal.2022; 68(12): 1461.     CrossRef
  • Percutaneous Pulmonary Artery Cannulation to Treat Acute Secondary Right Heart Failure While on Veno-venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
    Kelly M. Ivins-O’Keefe, Michael S. Cahill, Arthur R. Mielke, Michal J. Sobieszczyk, Valerie G. Sams, Phillip E. Mason, Matthew D. Read
    ASAIO Journal.2022; 68(12): 1483.     CrossRef
  • The ProtekDuo for percutaneous V-P and V-VP ECMO in patients with COVID-19 ARDS
    Ahmed M El Banayosy, Aly El Banayosy, Joseph M Brewer, Mircea R Mihu, Jaclyn M Chidester, Laura V Swant, Robert S Schoaps, Ammar Sharif, Marc O Maybauer
    The International Journal of Artificial Organs.2022; 45(12): 1006.     CrossRef
  • Critical Care Management of the Patient with Pulmonary Hypertension
    Christopher J. Mullin, Corey E. Ventetuolo
    Clinics in Chest Medicine.2021; 42(1): 155.     CrossRef
  • Successful Lung Transplantation After 213 Days of Extracorporeal Life Support: Role of Oxygenator-Right Ventricular Assist Device
    Jae Kyeom Sim, Kyeongman Jeon, Gee Young Suh, Suryeun Chung, Yang Hyun Cho
    ASAIO Journal.2021; 67(7): e127.     CrossRef
  • Oxy-right Ventricular Assist Device for Bridging of Right Heart Failure to Lung Transplantation
    Sung Kwang Lee, Do Hyung Kim, Woo Hyun Cho, Hye Ju Yeo
    Transplantation.2021; 105(7): 1610.     CrossRef
  • Interventional and Surgical Treatments for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Tomasz Stącel, Magdalena Latos, Maciej Urlik, Mirosław Nęcki, Remigiusz Antończyk, Tomasz Hrapkowicz, Marcin Kurzyna, Marek Ochman
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(15): 3326.     CrossRef
  • Intraoperative Management of Adult Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: an Expert Consensus Statement From the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists—Part I, Technical Aspects of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
    Michael A. Mazzeffi, Vidya K. Rao, Jeffrey Dodd-o, Jose Mauricio Del Rio, Antonio Hernandez, Mabel Chung, Amit Bardia, Rebecca M. Bauer, Joseph S. Meltzer, Sree Satyapriya, Raymond Rector, James G. Ramsay, Jacob Gutsche
    Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia.2021; 35(12): 3496.     CrossRef
  • Intraoperative Management of Adult Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: An Expert Consensus Statement From the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists—Part I, Technical Aspects of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
    Michael A. Mazzeffi, Vidya K. Rao, Jeffrey Dodd-o, Jose Mauricio Del Rio, Antonio Hernandez, Mabel Chung, Amit Bardia, Rebecca M. Bauer, Joseph S. Meltzer, Sree Satyapriya, Raymond Rector, James G. Ramsay, Jacob Gutsche
    Anesthesia & Analgesia.2021; 133(6): 1459.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Central extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and early rehabilitation for persistent severe pulmonary hypertension following pulmonary endarterectomy
Gil Myeong Seong, Sang-Bum Hong, Jin Won Huh, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Jae Won Lee, Sung-Ho Jung, Duck-Woo Park, Jae Seung Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(2):158-164.   Published online November 7, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2016.01032
  • 5,860 View
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  • 1 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is potentially curable with a pulmonary endarterectomy. However, approximately 20% of patients have persistent pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary endarterectomy, which is a major risk factor for postoperative death. Here, we report a 34-year-old woman who suffered persistent severe pulmonary hypertension following a successful pulmonary endarterectomy for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and atrial septostomy were successfully performed as rescue treatments, and active rehabilitation during ECMO was prescribed to facilitate recovery.

Citations

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  • Transatrial balloon atrial septostomy to facilitate weaning off venoarterial ECMO after pulmonary endarterectomy
    Koray Ak, Gökhan Arslanhan, Yakup Tire, Sinan Tosun, Alper Kararmaz, İsmail Hanta, Bedrettin Yıldızeli
    The International Journal of Artificial Organs.2022; 45(10): 883.     CrossRef
  • Cardiac Rehabilitation in Heart Failure
    Kyeong-hyeon Chun, Seok-Min Kang
    International Journal of Heart Failure.2021; 3(1): 1.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Basic science and research
Anti-inflammatory Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in an Acute Lung Injury Mouse Model
Jin Won Huh, Won Young Kim, Yun Young Park, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Mi-Jung Kim, Sang-Bum Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(3):154-161.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00619
  • 5,975 View
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  • 9 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate injury in various lung injury models through paracrine effects. We hypothesized that intratracheal transplantation of allogenic MSCs could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice, mediated by anti-inflammatory responses.
Methods
Six-week-old male mice were randomized to either the control or the ALI group. ALI was induced by intratracheal LPS instillation. Four hours after LPS instillation, MSCs or phosphate-buffered saline was randomly intratracheally administered. Neutrophil count and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); lung histology; levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2; and the expression of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), caspase-3, and caspase-9 were evaluated at 48 hours after injury.
Results
Treatment with MSCs attenuated lung injury in ALI mice by decreasing protein level and neutrophil recruitment into the BALF and improving the histologic change. MSCs also decreased the protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, but had little effect on the protein expression of PCNA, caspase-3, and caspase-9.
Conclusions
Intratracheal injection of bone marrow-derived allogenic MSCs attenuates LPSinduced ALI via immunomodulatory effects.

Citations

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  • The Effectiveness of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Mixed with Platelet-Rich Plasma in the Healing of Inflammatory Bowel Anastomoses: A Pre-Clinical Study in Rats
    Georgios Geropoulos, Kyriakos Psarras, Maria Papaioannou, Vasileios Geropoulos, Argyri Niti, Christina Nikolaidou, Georgios Koimtzis, Nikolaos Symeonidis, Efstathios T. Pavlidis, Georgios Koliakos, Theodoros E. Pavlidis, Ioannis Galanis
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2024; 14(1): 121.     CrossRef
  • Cyclic Phytosphingosine-1-Phosphate Primed Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ameliorate LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice
    Youngheon Park, Jimin Jang, Jooyeon Lee, Hyosin Baek, Jaehyun Park, Sang-Ryul Cha, Se Bi Lee, Sunghun Na, Jae-Woo Kwon, Seok-Ho Hong, Se-Ran Yang
    International Journal of Stem Cells.2023; 16(2): 191.     CrossRef
  • Mesenchymal stem cells and their derived exosomes to combat Covid–19
    Maryam Yousefi Dehbidi, Nima Goodarzi, Mohammad H. Azhdari, Mohammad Doroudian
    Reviews in Medical Virology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Stem Cell‐based therapies for COVID‐19‐related acute respiratory distress syndrome
    Hoi Wa Ngai, Dae Hong Kim, Mohamed Hammad, Margarita Gutova, Karen Aboody, Christopher D. Cox
    Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine.2022; 26(9): 2483.     CrossRef
  • Development of a physiomimetic model of acute respiratory distress syndrome by using ECM hydrogels and organ-on-a-chip devices
    Esther Marhuenda, Alvaro Villarino, Maria Narciso, Linda Elowsson, Isaac Almendros, Gunilla Westergren-Thorsson, Ramon Farré, Núria Gavara, Jorge Otero
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Chang Liu, Kun Xiao, Lixin Xie
    Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Auxiliary role of mesenchymal stem cells as regenerative medicine soldiers to attenuate inflammatory processes of severe acute respiratory infections caused by COVID-19
    Peyvand Parhizkar Roudsari, Sepideh Alavi-Moghadam, Moloud Payab, Forough Azam Sayahpour, Hamid Reza Aghayan, Parisa Goodarzi, Fereshteh Mohamadi-jahani, Bagher Larijani, Babak Arjmand
    Cell and Tissue Banking.2020; 21(3): 405.     CrossRef
  • The Role of MSC Therapy in Attenuating the Damaging Effects of the Cytokine Storm Induced by COVID-19 on the Heart and Cardiovascular System
    Georgina M. Ellison-Hughes, Liam Colley, Katie A. O'Brien, Kirsty A. Roberts, Thomas A. Agbaedeng, Mark D. Ross
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Global and Regional Ventilation during High Flow Nasal Cannula in Patients with Hypoxia
Dong Hyun Lee, Eun Young Kim, Ga Jin Seo, Hee Jung Suh, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(1):7-15.   Published online January 22, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2017.00507
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2021;36(2):173
  • 8,126 View
  • 250 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is known to increase global ventilation volume in healthy subjects. We sought to investigate the effect of HFNC on global and regional ventilation patterns in patients with hypoxia.
Methods
Patients were randomized to receive one of two oxygen therapies in sequence: nasal cannula (NC) followed by HFNC or HFNC followed by NC. Global and regional ventilation was assessed using electric impedance tomography.
Results
Twenty-four patients participated. Global tidal variation (TV) in the lung was higher during HFNC (NC, 2,241 ± 1,381 arbitrary units (AU); HFNC, 2,543 ± 1,534 AU; P < 0.001). Regional TVs for four iso-gravitational quadrants of the lung were also all higher during HFNC than NC. The coefficient of variation for the four quadrants of the lung was 0.90 ± 0.61 during NC and 0.77 ± 0.48 during HFNC (P = 0.035). Within the four gravitational layers of the lung, regional TVs were higher in the two middle layers during HFNC when compared to NC. Regional TV values in the most ventral and dorsal layers of the lung were not higher during HFNC compared with NC. The coefficient of variation for the four gravitational layers of the lung were 1.00 ± 0.57 during NC and 0.97 ± 0.42 during HFNC (P = 0.574).
Conclusions
In patients with hypoxia, ventilation of iso-gravitational regions of the lung during HFNC was higher and more homogenized compared with NC. However, ventilation of gravitational layers increased only in the middle layers. (Clinical trials registration number: NCT02943863).

Citations

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  • High-flow nasal cannulae for respiratory support in adult intensive care patients
    Sharon R Lewis, Philip E Baker, Roses Parker, Andrew F Smith
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Failure of High-Flow Nasal Cannula Therapy in Pneumonia and Non-Pneumonia Sepsis Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study
    Eunhye Kim, Kyeongman Jeon, Dong Kyu Oh, Young-Jae Cho, Sang-Bum Hong, Yeon Joo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Gee Young Suh, Mi-Hyeon Park, Chae-Man Lim, Sunghoon Park
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(16): 3587.     CrossRef
  • High-flow nasal cannulae for respiratory support in adult intensive care patients
    Sharon R Lewis, Philip E Baker, Roses Parker, Andrew F Smith
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Hematology/Cardiology
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support in Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies and Severe Acute Respiratory Failure
Tai Sun Park, You Na Oh, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Je-Hwan Lee, Jung-Hee Lee, Kyoo-Hyung Lee, Jin Won Huh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(3):243-250.   Published online August 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00318
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Administering extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome has substantially increased over the last decade, however administering ECMO to patients with hematologic malignancies may carry a particularly high risk. Here, we report the clinical outcomes of patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure who were treated with ECMO.
Methods
We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure who were treated with ECMO at the medical intensive care unit of a tertiary referral hospital between March 2010 and April 2015.
Results
A total of 15 patients (9 men; median age 45 years) with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure received ECMO therapy during the study period. The median values of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, Murray Lung Injury Score, and Respiratory Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Survival Prediction Score were 29, 3.3, and -2, respectively. Seven patients received venovenous ECMO, whereas 8 patients received venoarterial ECMO. The median ECMO duration was 2 days. Successful weaning of ECMO was achieved in 3 patients. Hemorrhage complications developed in 4 patients (1 pulmonary hemorrhage, 1 intracranial hemorrhage, and 2 cases of gastrointestinal bleeding). The longest period of patient survival was 59 days after ECMO initiation. No significant differences in survival were noted between venovenous and venoarterial ECMO groups (10.0 vs. 10.5 days; p = 0.56).
Conclusions
Patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure demonstrate poor outcomes after ECMO treatment. Careful and appropriate selection of candidates for ECMO in these patients is necessary.

Citations

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  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with hematologic malignancies: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Jackie Jia Lin Sim, Saikat Mitra, Ryan Ruiyang Ling, Chuen Seng Tan, Bingwen Eugene Fan, Graeme MacLaren, Kollengode Ramanathan
    Annals of Hematology.2022; 101(7): 1395.     CrossRef
  • Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation with rituximab‐combined chemotherapy in AIDS‐associated primary cardiac lymphoma: A case report
    Hoyuri Fuseya, Takuro Yoshimura, Minako Tsutsumi, Yosuke Nakaya, Mirei Horiuchi, Masahiro Yoshida, Yoshiki Hayashi, Takafumi Nakao, Takeshi Inoue, Takahisa Yamane
    Clinical Case Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Extracorporeal Life Support in Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies and Acute Circulatory and/or Respiratory Failure
    Sungbin Cho, Won Chul Cho, Ju Yong Lim, Pil Je Kang
    The Korean Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.2019; 52(1): 25.     CrossRef
Ethics
Effect of Timing of Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders on the Clinical Outcome of Critically Ill Patients
Moon Seong Baek, Younsuck Koh, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Jin Won Huh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(3):229-235.   Published online August 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00178
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Many physicians hesitate to discuss do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders with patients or family members in critical situations. In the intensive care unit (ICU), delayed DNR decisions could cause unintentional cardiopulmonary resuscitation, patient distress, and substantial cost. We investigated whether the timing of DNR designation affects patient outcome in the medical ICU.
Methods
We enrolled retrospective patients with written DNR orders in a medical ICU (13 bed) from June 1, 2014 to May 31, 2015. The patients were divided into two groups: early DNR patients for whom DNR orders were implemented within 48 h of ICU admission, and late DNR patients for whom DNR orders were implemented more than 48 h after ICU admission.
Results
Herein, 354 patients were admitted to the medical ICU and among them, 80 (22.6%) patients had requested DNR orders. Of these patients, 37 (46.3%) had designated DNR orders within 48 hours of ICU admission and 43 (53.7%) patients had designated DNR orders more than 48 hours after ICU admission. Compared with early DNR patients, late DNR patients tended to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining management (18.9% vs. 37.2%, p = 0.072). DNR consent forms were signed by family members instead of the patients. Septic shock was the most common cause of medical ICU admission in both the early and late DNR patients (54.1% vs. 37.2%, p = 0.131). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality (83.8% vs. 81.4%, p = 0.779). Late DNR patients had longer ICU stays than early DNR patients (7.4 ± 8.1 vs. 19.7 ± 19.2, p < 0.001).
Conclusions
Clinical outcomes are not influenced by the time of DNR designation in the medical ICU. The late DNR group is associated with a longer length of ICU stay and a tendency of withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment. However, further studies are needed to clarify the guideline for end-of-life care in critically ill patients.

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  • Characteristics and outcomes of patients with do-not-resuscitate and physician orders for life-sustaining treatment in a medical intensive care unit: a retrospective cohort study
    Song-I Lee, Ye-Rin Ju, Da Hyun Kang, Jeong Eun Lee
    BMC Palliative Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prognostic models of in-hospital mortality of intensive care patients using neural representation of unstructured text: A systematic review and critical appraisal
    I. Vagliano, N. Dormosh, M. Rios, T.T. Luik, T.M. Buonocore, P.W.G. Elbers, D.A. Dongelmans, M.C. Schut, A. Abu-Hanna
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    Ting-Yu Hsu, Pei-Ming Wang, Po-Chun Chuang, Yan-Ren Lin, Yuan-Jhen Syue, Tsung-Cheng Tsai, Chao-Jui Li
    Healthcare.2022; 10(3): 434.     CrossRef
  • Early DNR in Older Adults Hospitalized with SARS-CoV-2 Infection During Initial Pandemic Surge
    Shalin Shah, Alex Makhnevich, Jessica Cohen, Meng Zhang, Allison Marziliano, Michael Qiu, Yan Liu, Michael A. Diefenbach, Maria Carney, Edith Burns, Liron Sinvani
    American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine®.2022; 39(12): 1491.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of Signing Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders on the Use of Non-Beneficial Life-Sustaining Treatments for Intensive Care Unit Patients: A Retrospective Study
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    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(15): 9521.     CrossRef
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    Seo In Lee, Kyung Sook Hong, Jin Park, Young-Joo Lee
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    Gulcan Bakan, Mert Ozen, Arife Azak, Bulent Erdur
    International Emergency Nursing.2020; 53: 100934.     CrossRef
  • Do‐Not‐Resuscitate Orders in Older Adults During Hospitalization: A Propensity Score–Matched Analysis
    Karishma Patel, Liron Sinvani, Vidhi Patel, Andrzej Kozikowski, Christopher Smilios, Meredith Akerman, Kinga Kiszko, Sutapa Maiti, Negin Hajizadeh, Gisele Wolf‐Klein, Renee Pekmezaris
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    Hyun A Kim, Jeong Yun Park
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  • The Authors Reply
    Jeong Uk Lim, Jongmin Lee, Jick Hwan Ha, Hyeon Hui Kang, Sang Haak Lee, Hwa Sik Moon
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2017; 32(4): 377.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Pulmonary
Lung Transplantation for Chronic Humidifier Disinfectant-Associated Lung Injury
Won-Young Kim, So-Woon Kim, Kyung-Wook Jo, Sae Hoon Choi, Hyung Ryul Kim, Yong-Hee Kim, Dong Kwan Kim, Seung-Il Park, Sang-Bum Hong
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(2):146-151.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.146
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AbstractAbstract PDF
In the spring of 2011, a cluster of lung injuries caused by humidifier disinfectant (HD) usage were reported in Korea. Many patients required mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and even lung transplantation (LTPL). However, the long-term course of HD-associated lung injury remains unclear because the majority of survivors recovered normal lung function. Here we report a 33-year-old woman who underwent LTPL approximately four years after severe HD-associated lung injury. The patient was initially admitted to the intensive care unit and was supported by a high-flow nasal cannula. Although she had been discharged, she was recurrently admitted to our hospital due to progressive lung fibrosis and a persistent decline in lung function. Finally, sequential double LTPL was successfully performed, and the patient’s clinical and radiological findings showed significant improvement. Therefore, we conclude that LTPL can be a therapeutic option for patients with chronic inhalation injury.

Citations

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  • Humidifier Disinfectant-Associated Lung Injury: Six Years after the Tragic Event
    Won-Young Kim, Sang-Bum Hong
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2017; 80(4): 351.     CrossRef
Lung Transplantation in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Influenza Pneumonia
Youjin Chang, Sang Oh Lee, Tae Sun Shim, Sae Hoon Choi, Hyung Ryul Kim, Yong-Hee Kim, Dong Kwan Kim, Seung-Il Park, Sang-Bum Hong
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2015;30(3):196-201.   Published online August 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2015.30.3.196
  • 473 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening disease with a high mortality rate. Although many therapeutic trials have been performed for improving the mortality of severe ARDS, limited strategies have demonstrated better outcomes. Recently, advanced rescue therapies such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) made it possible to consider lung transplantation (LTPL) in patients with ARDS, but data is insufficient. We report a 62-year-old man who underwent LTPL due to ARDS with no underlying lung disease. He was admitted to the hospital due to influenza A pneumonia-induced ARDS. Although he was supported by ECMO, he progressively deteriorated. We judged that his lungs were irreversibly damaged and decided he needed to undergo LTPL. Finally, bilateral sequential double-lung transplantation was successfully performed. He has since been alive for three years. Conclusively, we demonstrate that LTPL can be a therapeutic option in patients with severe ARDS refractory to conventional therapies.

Citations

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  • Lung transplantation for acute respiratory distress syndrome: a retrospective European cohort study
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ACC : Acute and Critical Care