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Volume 38 (2); May 2023
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Review Article
Ethics
Impact of institutional case volume on intensive care unit mortality
Christine Kang, Ho Geol Ryu
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):151-159.   Published online May 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00689
  • 1,926 View
  • 148 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The primary aim of this review is to explore current knowledge on the relationship between institutional intensive care unit (ICU) patient volume and patient outcomes. Studies indicate that a higher institutional ICU patient volume is positively correlated with patient survival. Although the exact mechanism underlying this association remains unclear, several studies have proposed that the cumulative experience of physicians and selective referral between institutions may play a role. The overall ICU mortality rate in Korea is relatively high compared to other developed countries. A distinctive aspect of critical care in Korea is the existence of significant disparities in the quality of care and services provided across regions and hospitals. Addressing these disparities and optimizing the management of critically ill patients necessitates thoroughly trained intensivists who are well-versed in the latest clinical practice guidelines. A fully functioning unit with adequate patient throughput is also essential for maintaining consistent and reliable quality of patient care. However, the positive impact of ICU volume on mortality outcomes is also linked to complex organizational factors, such as multidisciplinary rounds, nurse staffing and education, the presence of a clinical pharmacist, care protocols for weaning and sedation, and a culture of teamwork and communication. Despite some inconsistencies in the association between ICU patient volume and patient outcomes, which are thought to arise from differences in healthcare systems, ICU case volume significantly affects patient outcomes and should be taken into account when formulating related healthcare policies.
Original Articles
Meta-analysis
Comparison of safety and efficacy between therapeutic or intermediate versus prophylactic anticoagulation for thrombosis in COVID-19 patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Hyeon-Jeong Lee, Hye Jin Jang, Won-Il Choi, Joonsung Joh, Junghyun Kim, Jungeun Park, Miyoung Choi
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):160-171.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01424
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2023;38(4):516
  • 2,080 View
  • 158 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infections often have macrovascular or microvascular thrombosis and inflammation, which are known to be associated with a poor prognosis. Heparin has been hypothesized that administration of heparin with treatment dose rather than prophylactic dose for prevention of deep vein thrombosis in COVID-19 patients. Methods: Studies comparing therapeutic or intermediate anticoagulation with prophylactic anticoagulation in COVID-19 patients were eligible. Mortality, thromboembolic events, and bleeding were the primary outcomes. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and KMbase were searched up to July 2021. A meta-analysis was performed using random-effect model. Subgroup analysis was conducted according to disease severity. Results: Six randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 4,678 patients and four cohort studies with 1,080 patients were included in this review. In the RCTs, the therapeutic or intermediate anticoagulation was associated with significant reductions in the occurrence of thromboembolic events (5 studies, n=4,664; relative risk [RR], 0.72; P=0.01), and a significant increase in bleeding events (5 studies, n=4,667; RR, 1.88; P=0.004). In the moderate patients, therapeutic or intermediate anticoagulation was more beneficial than prophylactic anticoagulation in terms of thromboembolic events, but showed significantly higher bleeding events. In the severe patients, the incidence of thromboembolic and bleeding events in the therapeutic or intermediate. Conclusions: The study findings suggest that prophylactic anticoagulant treatment should be used in patients with moderate and severe COVID-19 infection groups. Further studies are needed to determine more individualized anticoagulation guidance for all COVID-19 patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Community Pharmacy as a Study Center for the Epidemiological Analysis of the Population Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2: Evaluation of Vaccine Safety and Pharmaceutical Service
    Jacopo Raffaele Dibenedetto, Michela Cetrone, Marina Antonacci, Domenico Pio Cannone, Stefania Antonacci, Pasquale Bratta, Francesco Leonetti, Domenico Tricarico
    Pharmacy.2024; 12(1): 16.     CrossRef
  • Specific and Non-specific Aspects and Future Challenges of ICU Care Among COVID-19 Patients with Obesity: A Narrative Review
    Alexandra Beurton, Emma J. Kooistra, Audrey De Jong, Helmut Schiffl, Mercedes Jourdain, Bruno Garcia, Damien Vimpère, Samir Jaber, Peter Pickkers, Laurent Papazian
    Current Obesity Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Relationship between positive end-expiratory pressure levels, central venous pressure, systemic inflammation and acute renal failure in critically ill ventilated COVID-19 patients: a monocenter retrospective study in France
Pierre Basse, Louis Morisson, Romain Barthélémy, Nathan Julian, Manuel Kindermans, Magalie Collet, Benjamin Huot, Etienne Gayat, Alexandre Mebazaa, Benjamin G. Chousterman
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):172-181.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01494
  • 2,196 View
  • 76 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
The role of positive pressure ventilation, central venous pressure (CVP) and inflammation on the occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) have been poorly described in mechanically ventilated patient secondary to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods: This was a monocenter retrospective cohort study of consecutive ventilated COVID-19 patients admitted in a French surgical intensive care unit between March 2020 and July 2020. Worsening renal function (WRF) was defined as development of a new AKI or a persistent AKI during the 5 days after mechanical ventilation initiation. We studied the association between WRF and ventilatory parameters including positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), CVP, and leukocytes count. Results: Fifty-seven patients were included, 12 (21%) presented WRF. Daily PEEP, 5 days mean PEEP and daily CVP values were not associated with occurrence of WRF. 5 days mean CVP was higher in the WRF group compared to patients without WRF (median [IQR], 12 mm Hg [11-13] vs. 10 mm Hg [9–12]; P=0.03). Multivariate models with adjustment on leukocytes and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II confirmed the association between CVP value and risk of WRF (odd ratio, 1.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.12–4.33). Leukocytes count was also associated with occurrence of WRF in the WRF group (14 G/L [11–18]) and the no-WRF group (9 G/L [8–11]) (P=0.002). Conclusions: In mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients, PEEP levels did not appear to influence occurrence of WRF. High CVP levels and leukocytes count are associated with risk of WRF.
Pulmonary
The role of ROX index–based intubation in COVID-19 pneumonia: a cross-sectional comparison and retrospective survival analysis
Sara Vergis, Sam Philip, Vergis Paul, Manjit George, Nevil C Philip, Mithu Tomy
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):182-189.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00206
  • 1,466 View
  • 85 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with acute respiratory failure who experience delayed initiation of invasive mechanical ventilation have poor outcomes. The lack of objective measures to define the timing of intubation is an area of concern. We investigated the effect of timing of intubation based on respiratory rate-oxygenation (ROX) index on the outcomes of COVID-19 pneumonia. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study performed in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Kerala, India. Patients with COVID-19 pneumonia who were intubated were grouped into early intubation (within 12 hours of ROX index <4.88) or delayed intubation (12 hours or more hours after ROX <4.88). Results: A total of 58 patients was included in the study after exclusions. Among them, 20 patients were intubated early, and 38 patients were intubated 12 hours after ROX index <4.88. The mean age of the study population was 57±14 years, and 55.0% of the patients were male; diabetes mellitus (48.3%) and hypertension (50.0%) were the most common comorbidities. The early intubation group had 88.2% successful extubation, while only 11.8% of the delayed group had successful extubation (P<0.001). Survival was also significantly more frequent in the early intubation group. Conclusions: Early intubation within 12 hours of ROX index <4.88 was associated with improved extubation and survival in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia.
CPR/Resuscitation
Prognostic significance of respiratory quotient in patients undergoing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Korea
Yun Im Lee, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Soo Jin Na, Jeong-Am Ryu, Yang Hyun Cho, Jeong Hoon Yang, Chi Ryang Chung, Gee Young Suh
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):190-199.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01438
  • 1,538 View
  • 82 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Respiratory quotient (RQ) may be used as a tissue hypoxia marker in various clinical settings but its prognostic significance in patients undergoing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) is not known. Methods: Medical records of adult patients admitted to the intensive care units after ECPR in whom RQ could be calculated from May 2004 to April 2020 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into good neurologic outcome and poor neurologic outcome groups. Prognostic significance of RQ was compared to other clinical characteristics and markers of tissue hypoxia. Results: During the study period, 155 patients were eligible for analysis. Of them, 90 (58.1%) had a poor neurologic outcome. The group with poor neurologic outcome had a higher incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (25.6% vs. 9.2%, P=0.010) and longer cardiopulmonary resuscitation to pump-on time (33.0 vs. 25.2 minutes, P=0.001) than the group with good neurologic outcome. For tissue hypoxia markers, the group with poor neurologic outcome had higher RQ (2.2 vs. 1.7, P=0.021) and lactate levels (8.2 vs. 5.4 mmol/L, P=0.004) than the group with good neurologic outcome. On multivariable analysis, age, cardiopulmonary resuscitation to pump-on time, and lactate levels above 7.1 mmol/L were significant predictors for a poor neurologic outcome but not RQ. Conclusions: In patients who received ECPR, RQ was not independently associated with poor neurologic outcome.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Risk factors for neurological disability outcomes in patients under extracorporeal membrane oxygenation following cardiac arrest: An observational study
    Amir Vahedian-Azimi, Ibrahim Fawzy Hassan, Farshid Rahimi-Bashar, Hussam Elmelliti, Anzila Akbar, Ahmed Labib Shehata, Abdulsalam Saif Ibrahim, Ali Ait Hssain
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing.2024; 83: 103674.     CrossRef
  • Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and in-hospital cardiac arrest with return of spontaneous circulation: be careful when comparing apples to oranges
    Hwa Jin Cho, In Seok Jeong, Jan Bělohlávek
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(2): 242.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Evaluating diaphragmatic dysfunction and predicting non-invasive ventilation failure in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in India
Nupur B Patel, Gaurav Jain, Udit Chauhan, Ajeet Singh Bhadoria, Saurabh Chandrakar, Haritha Indulekha
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):200-208.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01060
  • 1,987 View
  • 87 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Baseline diaphragmatic dysfunction (DD) at the initiation of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) correlates positively with subsequent intubation. We investigated the utility of DD detected 2 hours after NIV initiation in estimating NIV failure in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) patients. Methods: In a prospective-cohort design, we enrolled 60 consecutive patients with AECOPD initiated on NIV at intensive care unit admission, and NIV failure events were noted. The DD was assessed at baseline (T1 timepoint) and 2 hours after initiating NIV (T2 timepoint). We defined DD as ultrasound-assessed change in diaphragmatic thickness (ΔTDI) <20% (predefined criteria [PC]) or its cut-off that predicts NIV failure (calculated criteria [CC]) at both timepoints. A predictive-regression analysis was reported. Results: In total, 32 patients developed NIV failure, nine within 2 hours of NIV and remaining in next 6 days. The ∆TDI cut-off that predicted NIV failure (DD-CC) at T1 was ≤19.04% (area under the curve [AUC], 0.73; sensitivity, 50%; specificity, 85.71%; accuracy; 66.67%), while that at T2 was ≤35.3% (AUC, 0.75; sensitivity, 95.65%; specificity, 57.14%; accuracy, 74.51%; hazard ratio, 19.55). The NIV failure rate was 35.1% in those with normal diaphragmatic function by PC (T2) versus 5.9% by CC (T2). The odds ratio for NIV failure with DD criteria ≤35.3 and <20 at T2 was 29.33 and 4.61, while that for ≤19.04 and <20 at T1 was 6, respectively. Conclusions: The DD criterion of ≤35.3 (T2) had a better diagnostic profile compared to baseline and PC in prediction of NIV failure.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Advancing healthcare through thoracic ultrasound research in older patients
    Simone Scarlata, Chukwuma Okoye, Sonia Zotti, Fulvio Lauretani, Antonio Nouvenne, Nicoletta Cerundolo, Adriana Antonella Bruni, Monica Torrini, Alberto Finazzi, Tessa Mazzarone, Marco Lunian, Irene Zucchini, Lorenzo Maccioni, Daniela Guarino, Silvia Fabbr
    Aging Clinical and Experimental Research.2023; 35(12): 2887.     CrossRef
CPR/Resuscitation
Percent fluid overload for prediction of fluid de-escalation in critically ill patients in Saudi Arabia: a prospective observational study
Reham A. Alharbi, Namareq F. Aldardeer, Emily L. G. Heaphy, Ahmad H. Alabbasi, Amjad M. Albuqami, Hassan Hawa
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):209-216.   Published online May 16, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01550
  • 1,835 View
  • 109 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Percent fluid overload greater than 5% is associated with increased mortality. The appropriate time for fluid deresuscitation depends on the patient's radiological and clinical findings. This study aimed to assess the applicability of percent fluid overload calculations for evaluating the need for fluid deresuscitation in critically ill patients. Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, observational study of critically ill adult patients requiring intravenous fluid administration. The study's primary outcome was median percent fluid accumulation on the day of fluid deresuscitation or intensive care unit (ICU) discharge, whichever came first. Results: A total of 388 patients was screened between August 1, 2021, and April 30, 2022. Of these, 100 with a mean age of 59.8±16.2 years were included for analysis. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 15.4±8.0. Sixty-one patients (61.0%) required fluid deresuscitation during their ICU stay, while 39 (39.0%) did not. Median percent fluid accumulation on the day of deresuscitation or ICU discharge was 4.5% (interquartile range [IQR], 1.7%–9.1%) and 5.2% (IQR, 2.9%–7.7%) in patients requiring deresuscitation and those who did not, respectively. Hospital mortality occurred in 25 (40.9%) of patients with deresuscitation and six (15.3%) patients who did not require it (P=0.007). Conclusions: The percent fluid accumulation on the day of fluid deresuscitation or ICU discharge was not statistically different between patients who required fluid deresuscitation and those who did not. A larger sample size is needed to confirm these findings.
Nephrology
Epidemiology and outcome of an acute kidney injuries in the polytrauma victims admitted at the apex trauma center in Dubai
Bhushan Sudhakar Wankhade, Zeyad Faoor Alrais, Ghaya Zeyad Alrais, Ammar Mohamed Abdel Hadi, Gopala Arun Kumar Naidu, Mohammed Shahid Abbas, Ahmed Tarek Youssef Aboul Kheir, Hasan Hadad, Sundareswaran Sharma, Mohammad Sait
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):217-225.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00388
  • 1,708 View
  • 77 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Polytrauma from road accidents is a common cause of hospital admissions and deaths, frequently leading to acute kidney injury (AKI) and impacting patient outcomes. Methods: This retrospective, single-center study included polytrauma victims with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) >25 at a tertiary healthcare center in Dubai. Results: The incidence of AKI in polytrauma victims is 30.5%, associated with higher Carlson comorbidity index (P=0.021) and ISS (P=0.001). Logistic regression shows a significant relationship between ISS and AKI (odds ratio [OR], 1.191; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.150–1.233; P<0.05). The main causes of trauma-induced AKI are hemorrhagic shock (P=0.001), need for massive transfusion (P<0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P=0.001), and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS; P<0.001). On multivariate logistic regression AKI can be predicated by higher ISS (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.00–1.17; P=0.05) and low mixed venous oxygen saturation (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.05–1.22; P<0.001). The development of AKI after polytrauma increases length of stay (LOS)-hospital (P=0.006), LOS-intensive care unit (ICU; P=0.003), need for mechanical ventilation (MV) (P<0.001), ventilator days (P=0.001), and mortality (P<0.001). Conclusions: After polytrauma, the occurrence of AKI leads to prolonged hospital and ICU stays, increased need for mechanical ventilation, more ventilator days, and a higher mortality rate. AKI could significantly impact their prognosis.
Trauma
Comparison of admission GCS score to admission GCS-P and FOUR scores for prediction of outcomes among patients with traumatic brain injury in the intensive care unit in India
Nishant Agrawal, Shivakumar S Iyer, Vishwanath Patil, Sampada Kulkarni, Jignesh N Shah, Prashant Jedge
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):226-233.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00570
  • 2,627 View
  • 174 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to determine the predictive power of the Full Outline of Unresponsiveness (FOUR) score and the Glasgow Coma Scale Pupil (GCS-P) score in determining outcomes for traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was used to evaluate patients at 1 month and 6 months after the injury. Methods: We conducted a 15-month prospective observational study. It included 50 TBI patients admitted to the ICU who met our inclusion criteria. We used Pearson’s correlation coefficient to relate coma scales and outcome measures. The predictive value of these scales was determined using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, calculating the area under the curve with a 99% confidence interval. All hypotheses were two-tailed, and significance was defined as P<0.01. Results: In the present study, the GCS-P and FOUR scores among all patients on admission as well as in the subset of patients who were mechanically ventilated were statistically significant and strongly correlated with patient outcomes. The correlation coefficient of the GCS score compared to GCS-P and FOUR scores was higher and statistically significant. The areas under the ROC curve for the GCS, GCS-P, and FOUR scores and the number of computed tomography abnormalities were 0.912, 0.905, 0.937, and 0.324, respectively. Conclusions: The GCS, GCS-P, and FOUR scores are all excellent predictors with a strong positive linear correlation with final outcome prediction. In particular, the GCS score has the best correlation with final outcome.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Development of a Novel Neurological Score Combining GCS and FOUR Scales for Assessment of Neurosurgical Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: GCS-FOUR Scale
    Ali Ansari, Sina Zoghi, Amirabbas Khoshbooei, Mohammad Amin Mosayebi, Maryam Feili, Omid Yousefi, Amin Niakan, Seyed Amin Kouhpayeh, Reza Taheri, Hosseinali Khalili
    World Neurosurgery.2024; 182: e866.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Glasgow Coma Scale Full Outline of UnResponsiveness and Glasgow Coma Scale: Pupils Score for Predicting Outcome in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury
    Indu Kapoor, Hemanshu Prabhakar, Arvind Chaturvedi, Charu Mahajan, Abraham L Chawnchhim, Tej P Sinha
    Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2024; 28(3): 256.     CrossRef
Letters to the Editor
Thoracic Surgery
Comment on “Risk factors for intensive care unit readmission after lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study”
Maida Qazi, Mahnoor Amin
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):234-235.   Published online January 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01214
  • 1,421 View
  • 50 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Reply to comment on “Risk factors for intensive care unit readmission after lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study”
    Hye-Bin Kim, Sungwon Na, Hyo Chae Paik, Hyeji Joo, Jeongmin Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(2): 236.     CrossRef
Thoracic Surgery
Reply to comment on “Risk factors for intensive care unit readmission after lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study”
Hye-Bin Kim, Sungwon Na, Hyo Chae Paik, Hyeji Joo, Jeongmin Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):236-237.   Published online May 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00556
  • 660 View
  • 41 Download
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Pulmonary
Septic shock due to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis without conventional risk factors
Kyung Eun Shin, Shinhee Park, Ae-Rin Baek
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):238-241.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00437
  • 885 View
  • 56 Download
PDF
Editorial
CPR/Resuscitation
Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and in-hospital cardiac arrest with return of spontaneous circulation: be careful when comparing apples to oranges
Hwa Jin Cho, In Seok Jeong, Jan Bělohlávek
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):242-243.   Published online May 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00731
  • 801 View
  • 50 Download
PDF
Case Report
Neurosurgery
What should an intensivist know about pneumocephalus and tension pneumocephalus?
Bhushan Sudhakar Wankhade, Maged Mohsen Kamel Beniamein, Zeyad Faoor Alrais, Jyoti Ittoop Mathew, Ghaya Zeyad Alrais
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):244-248.   Published online April 13, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01102
  • 12,758 View
  • 351 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Collection of air in the cranial cavity is called pneumocephalus. Although simple pneumocephalus is a benign condition, accompanying increased intracranial pressure can produce a life-threatening condition comparable to tension pneumothorax, which is termed tension pneumocephalus. We report a case of tension pneumocephalus after drainage of a cerebrospinal fluid hygroma. The tension pneumocephalus was treated with decompression craniotomy, but the patient later died due to the complications related to critical care. Traumatic brain injury and neurosurgical intervention are the most common causes of pneumocephalus. Pneumocephalus and tension pneumocephalus are neurosurgical emergencies, and anesthetics and intensive care management like the use of nitrous oxide during anesthesia and positive pressure ventilation have important implications in their development and progress. Clinically, patients can present with various nonspecific neurological manifestations that are indistinguishable from a those of a primary neurological condition. If the diagnosis is questionable, patients should be investigated using computed tomography of the brain. Immediate neurosurgical consultation with decompression is the treatment of choice.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sudden-onset, non-traumatic large volume pneumocephalus following presentation of acute bacterial meningitis
    Alexandra Krez, Michael Malinzak, Colby Feeney
    BMJ Case Reports.2024; 17(1): e256194.     CrossRef
  • Pneumocephalus; a rare cause of coma
    Elisavet Simoulidou, Vivian Georgopoulou, Panagiotis Kalmoukos, Dimitrios Kouroupis, Nikoleta Moscha, Maria Sidiropoulou, Sofia Chatzimichailidou, Konstantinos Petidis, Athina Pyrpasopoulou
    The American Journal of Emergency Medicine.2023; 68: 215.e1.     CrossRef
  • Pneumocephalus secondary to epidural analgesia: a case report
    Maira Ahmad, Shannay Bellamy, William Ott, Rany Mekhail
    Journal of Medical Case Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Transnasal Endoscopic Treatment of Tension Pneumocephalus Caused by Posttraumatic or Iatrogenic Ethmoidal Damage
    Goran Latif Omer, Riccardo Maurizi, Beatrice Francavilla, Kareem Rekawt Hama Rashid, Gianluca Velletrani, Hasan Mustafa Salah, Giulia Marzocchella, Mohammed Ibrahim Mohialdeen Gubari, Stefano Di Girolamo, Rong-San Jiang
    Case Reports in Otolaryngology.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • Tension pneumocephalus as a complication of surgical evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: case report and literature review
    Mohammed A. Azab, Ahmed Hazem, Brandon Lucke-Wold
    Exploration of Neuroprotective Therapy.2023; 3(4): 177.     CrossRef
Corrigendum
Infection
Corrigendum to “Methylprednisolone pulse therapy for critically ill patients with COVID-19: a cohort study”
Keum-Ju Choi, Soo Kyun Jung, Kyung Chan Kim, Eun Jin Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):249-249.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00941.e1
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2023;38(1):57
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ACC : Acute and Critical Care