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Cardiology
Diagnostic accuracy of left ventricular outflow tract velocity time integral versus inferior vena cava collapsibility index in predicting post-induction hypotension during general anesthesia: an observational study
Vibhuti Sharma, Arti Sharma, Arvind Sethi, Jyoti Pathania
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):117-126.   Published online February 23, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00913
  • 959 View
  • 86 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Point of care ultrasound (POCUS) is being explored for dynamic measurements like inferior vena cava collapsibility index (IVC-CI) and left ventricular outflow tract velocity time integral (LVOT-VTI) to guide anesthesiologists in predicting fluid responsiveness in the preoperative period and in treating post-induction hypotension (PIH) with varying accuracy. Methods: In this prospective, observational study on included 100 adult patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia, the LVOT-VTI and IVC-CI measurements were performed in the preoperative room 15 minutes prior to surgery, and PIH was measured for 20 minutes in the post-induction period. Results: The incidence of PIH was 24%. The area under the curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy of the two techniques at 95% confidence interval was 0.613, 30.4%, 93.3%, 58.3%, 81.4%, 73.6% for IVC-CI and 0.853, 83.3%, 80.3%, 57.1%, 93.8%, 77.4% for LVOT-VTI, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the cutoff value for IVC-CI was >51.5 and for LVOT-VTI it was ≤17.45 for predicting PIH with odd ratio [OR] of 8.491 (P=0.025) for IVCCI and OR of 17.427 (P<0.001) for LVOT. LVOT-VTI assessment was possible in all the patients, while 10% of patients were having poor window for IVC measurements. Conclusions: We recommend the use of POCUS using LVOT-VTI or IVC-CI to predict PIH, to decrease the morbidity of patients undergoing surgery. Out of these, we recommend LVOT-VTI measurements as it has showed a better diagnostic accuracy (77.4%) with no failure rate.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Where the Postanesthesia Care Unit and Intensive Care Unit Meet
    Mary Rose Gaylor, David N. Hager, Kathleen Tyson
    Critical Care Clinics.2024; 40(3): 523.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
The Use of Lung Ultrasound in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit
Hyung Koo Kang, Hyo Jin So, Deok Hee Kim, Hyeon-Kyoung Koo, Hye Kyeong Park, Sung-Soon Lee, Hoon Jung
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(4):323-332.   Published online November 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00318
  • 8,144 View
  • 253 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Pulmonary complications including pneumonia and pulmonary edema frequently develop in critically ill surgical patients. Lung ultrasound (LUS) is increasingly used as a powerful diagnostic tool for pulmonary complications. The purpose of this study was to report how LUS is used in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU).
Methods
This study retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 67 patients who underwent LUS in surgical ICU between May 2016 and December 2016.
Results
The indication for LUS included hypoxemia (n = 44, 65.7%), abnormal chest radiographs without hypoxemia (n = 17, 25.4%), fever without both hypoxemia and abnormal chest radiographs (n = 4, 6.0%), and difficult weaning (n = 2, 3.0%). Among 67 patients, 55 patients were diagnosed with pulmonary edema (n = 27, 41.8%), pneumonia (n = 20, 29.9%), diffuse interstitial pattern with anterior consolidation (n = 6, 10.9%), pneumothorax with effusion (n = 1, 1.5%), and diaphragm dysfunction (n = 1, 1.5%), respectively, via LUS. LUS results did not indicate lung complications for 12 patients. Based on the location of space opacification on the chest radiographs, among 45 patients with bilateral abnormality and normal findings, three (6.7%) and two (4.4%) patients were finally diagnosed with pneumonia and atelectasis, respectively. Furthermore, among 34 patients with unilateral abnormality and normal findings, two patients (5.9%) were finally diagnosed with pulmonary edema. There were 27 patients who were initially diagnosed with pulmonary edema via LUS. This diagnosis was later confirmed by other tests. There were 20 patients who were initially diagnosed with pneumonia via LUS. Among them, 16 and 4 patients were finally diagnosed with pneumonia and atelectasis, respectively.
Conclusions
LUS is useful to detect pulmonary complications including pulmonary edema and pneumonia in surgically ill patients.

Citations

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  • Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill
    Jin Sun Cho
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2017; 32(4): 356.     CrossRef
Neurology
The Effect of Electrical Muscle Stimulation and In-bed Cycling on Muscle Strength and Mass of Mechanically Ventilated Patients: A Pilot Study
Kyeongyoon Woo, Jeongmin Kim, Hye Bin Kim, Hyunwoo, Choi, Kibum Kim, Donghyung Lee, Sungwon Na
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(1):16-22.   Published online February 14, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2017.00542
  • 9,447 View
  • 340 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Critically ill patients experience muscle weakness, which leads to functional disability. Both functional electrical stimulation (FES) and in-bed cycling can be an alternative measure for intensive care unit (ICU) patients who are not feasible for active exercise. The aim of this study was to examine whether FES and in-bed cycling have a positive effect on muscle mass in ICU patients.
Methods
Critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours were included. After passive range of motion exercise, in-bed cycling was applied for 20 minutes, and FES was applied for 20 minutes on the left leg. The right leg received in-bed cycling and the left leg received both FES and in-bed cycling. Thigh circumferences and rectus femoris cross-sectional area (CSA) were assessed with ultrasonography before and after the intervention. Muscle strength was assessed by Medical Research Council scale.
Results
A total of 10 patients were enrolled in this study as a pilot study. Before and after the intervention, the CSA of right rectus femoris increased from 5.08 ± 1.51 cm2 to 6.01 ± 2.21 cm2 , which was statistically significant (P = 0.003). The thigh circumference was also increased and statistically significant (P = 0.006). There was no difference between left and right in regard to FES application. There is no significant change in muscle strength before and after the intervention (right and left, P = 0.317 and P = 0.368, respectively).
Conclusions
In-bed cycling increased thigh circumferences rectus femoris CSA. Adding FES did not show differences.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Assisted mobilisation in critical patients with COVID-19
    M. Polastri, F. Daniele, F. Tagariello
    Pulmonology.2024; 30(2): 152.     CrossRef
  • Ultrasound for measurement of skeletal muscle mass quantity and muscle composition/architecture in critically ill patients: A scoping review on studies' aims, methods, and findings
    Júlia Lima, Estéfani Foletto, Rafaella C.B. Cardoso, Charlles Garbelotto, Aline P. Frenzel, Juliana U. Carneiro, Larissa S. Carpes, Thiago G. Barbosa-Silva, Maria Cristina Gonzalez, Flávia M. Silva
    Clinical Nutrition.2024; 43(1): 95.     CrossRef
  • Current Concepts in Early Mobilization of Critically Ill Patients Within the Context of Neurologic Pathology
    Thaís Ferreira Lopes Diniz Maia, Paulo André Freire Magalhães, Dasdores Tatiana Silva Santos, Jorge Luiz de Brito Gomes, Paulo Adriano Schwingel, Aline de Freitas Brito
    Neurocritical Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Human skeletal muscle size with ultrasound imaging: a comprehensive review
    Masatoshi Naruse, Scott Trappe, Todd A. Trappe
    Journal of Applied Physiology.2022; 132(5): 1267.     CrossRef
  • Rehabilitation Therapy after the COVID-19 Era: Focused on Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation
    Hyung Ik Shin
    Annals of CardioPulmonary Rehabilitation.2021; 1(1): 17.     CrossRef
  • Rehabilitation Programs for Bedridden Patients with Prolonged Immobility: A Scoping Review Protocol
    Vitor Parola, Hugo Neves, Filipa Margarida Duque, Rafael A. Bernardes, Remy Cardoso, Carla A. Mendes, Liliana B. Sousa, Paulo Santos-Costa, Cândida Malça, Rúben Durães, Pedro Parreira, João Apóstolo, Arménio Cruz
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(22): 12033.     CrossRef
  • Non-paretic lower limb muscle wasting during acute phase is associated with dependent ambulation in patients with stroke
    Masafumi Nozoe, Masashi Kanai, Hiroki Kubo, Miho Yamamoto, Shinichi Shimada, Kyoshi Mase
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience.2020; 74: 141.     CrossRef
  • Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness: Not Just Another Muscle Atrophying Condition
    Heta Lad, Tyler M. Saumur, Margaret S. Herridge, Claudia C. dos Santos, Sunita Mathur, Jane Batt, Penney M. Gilbert
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2020; 21(21): 7840.     CrossRef
  • Problems with Rehabilitation for Critically ill Patients
    Masaji Nishimura
    The Japanese Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine.2019; 56(1): 48.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the Potential Effectiveness of Combining Optimal Nutrition With Electrical Stimulation to Maintain Muscle Health in Critical Illness: A Narrative Review
    Selina M. Parry, Lee‐anne S. Chapple, Marina Mourtzakis
    Nutrition in Clinical Practice.2018; 33(6): 772.     CrossRef
Cardiology
The Effect of the Valsalva Maneuver on the External Jugular Vein
Ho Sik Moon, Sung Hoon Jung, Sie Hyeon Yoo, Jae Young Ji, Hae Jin Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2015;30(3):158-163.   Published online August 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2015.30.3.158
  • 10,405 View
  • 100 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The external jugular vein (EJV) is a useful intravenous (IV) cannulation site for anesthesiologists, although it has a relatively high failure rate. Unlike other central veins, visualization of the EJV is important during IV cannulation, and the Valsalva maneuver distends the jugular venous system. However, the relationship between the maneuver and EJV visibility remains unknown. This study compared EJV visibility before and after the Valsalva maneuver.
Methods
This was a prospective observational study that included 200 participants. After the induction of anesthesia, EJV visibility grade, depth from the skin to the EJV superficial surface (EJV depth), and EJV cross-sectional area (CSA) before the Valsalva maneuver were measured. The same parameters were measured after the Valsalva maneuver was performed. The EJV visibility grade was defined as grade A: good appearance and good palpation, grade B: poor appearance and good palpation, and grade C: poor appearance and poor palpation.
Results
Patient body mass index and EJV depth affected the EJV visibility grade before the Valsalva maneuver (p < 0.05), although EJV CSA did not. The Valsalva maneuver distended EJV CSA and reduced EJV depth, although these changes were not correlated with EJV visibility grade. With regard to EJV visibility, 34.0% of grade B cases and 20.0% of grade C cases were improved by the Valsalva maneuver.
Conclusions
Although the Valsalva maneuver improved EJV CSA and EJV depth, it did not greatly affect EJV visibility grade.
Pulmonary
The Usefulness of Intensivist-Performed Bedside Drainage of Pleural Effusion via Ultrasound-Guided Pigtail Catheter
Joo Won Min, Joon Young Ohm, Byung Seok Shin, Jun Wan Lee, Sang Il Park, Seok Hwa Yoon, Yong Sup Shin, Dong Il Park, Chaeuk Chung, Jae Young Moon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(3):177-182.   Published online August 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.3.177
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
There has been little data reporting the usefulness of intensivist-performed bedside drainage of pleural effusion via ultrasound (US)-guided pigtail catheter. The objective of this study is to clarify the usefulness and safety of these methods in comparison with radiologist-performed procedures.
METHODS
Data of patients with pleural effusion treated with US-guided pigtail catheter drainage were analyzed. All procedures were performed from September 2012 to September. 2013 by a well-trained intensivist or radiologist.
RESULTS
Pleural effusion was drained in 25 patients in 33 sessions. A radiologist performed 21 sessions, and an intensivist performed 12 sessions. Procedures during mechanical ventilation were performed in 15 (71.4%) patients by a radiologist and in 10 (83.3%) by an intensivist (p = 0.678). The success rate was not significantly different in radiologist- and intensivist-performed procedures, 95.2% (20/21) and 83.3% (10/12), respectively (p = 0.538). The average duration for procedures (including in-hospital transfer) was longer in radiologist-performed cases (p = 0.001). Although the results are limited because of the small population size, aggravation of oxygenation, CO2 retention, and decrease of mean arterial blood pressure were not statistically different in the groups. Pigtail-associated complications including hemothorax, pneumothorax, hepatic perforation, empyema, kink in the catheter, and subcutaneous hematoma were not found.
CONCLUSIONS
Intensivist-performed bedside drainage of pleural effusion via ultrasound (US)-guided pigtail catheter is useful and safe and may be recommended in some patients in an intensive care unit.
Case Report
Ultrasound Guided Bronchoscopic Balloon Dilatation in the Management of Tracheal Stenosis: A Case Report
Jung Min Hong, Tae Kyun Kim, Ah Reum Cho, Do Won Lee, Yun Hee Han, Jae Young Kwon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2012;27(2):139-142.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2012.27.2.139
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AbstractAbstract PDF
We performed a balloon dilatation without a fluoroscopy monitoring by ultrasound. A 44 year old female patient was presented with subglottic stenosis, due to prolonged intubation. Although she had undergone tracheal resection and end-to-end anastomosis, the tracheal stenosis had recurred. She was scheduled for balloon dilatation. However, fluoroscopic guidance was not available, and thus, we used ultrasonographic monitoring as an alternative method. We performed a transverse scan, just cranial to the suprasternal notch, and we obtained a real time image of the trachea dilated by the balloon. We suggest that ultrasonographic monitoring is a useful adjunct to balloon dilatation in patients with tracheal stenosis.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care