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Original Articles
Pulmonary
Mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit in the United States with or without respiratory failure secondary to COVID-19 pneumonia: a retrospective comparison of characteristics and outcomes
Jesse A. Johnson, Kashka F. Mallari, Vincent M. Pepe, Taylor Treacy, Gregory McDonough, Phue Khaing, Christopher McGrath, Brandon J. George, Erika J. Yoo
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(3):298-307.   Published online August 23, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01123
  • 1,440 View
  • 42 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
There is increasing heterogeneity in the clinical phenotype of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19,) and reasons for mechanical ventilation are not limited to COVID pneumonia. We aimed to compare the characteristics and outcomes of intubated patients admitted to the ICU with the primary diagnosis of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) from COVID-19 pneumonia to those patients admitted for an alternative diagnosis.
Methods
Retrospective cohort study of adults with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection admitted to nine ICUs between March 18, 2020, and April 30, 2021, at an urban university institution. We compared characteristics between the two groups using appropriate statistics. We performed logistic regression to identify risk factors for death in the mechanically ventilated COVID-19 population.
Results
After exclusions, the final sample consisted of 319 patients with respiratory failure secondary to COVID pneumonia and 150 patients intubated for alternative diagnoses. The former group had higher ICU and hospital mortality rates (57.7% vs. 36.7%, P<0.001 and 58.9% vs. 39.3%, P<0.001, respectively). Patients with AHRF secondary to COVID-19 pneumonia also had longer ICU and hospital lengths-of-stay (12 vs. 6 days, P<0.001 and 20 vs. 13.5 days, P=0.001). After risk-adjustment, these patients had 2.25 times higher odds of death (95% confidence interval, 1.42–3.56; P=0.001).
Conclusions
Mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU with COVID-19-associated respiratory failure are at higher risk of hospital death and have worse ICU utilization outcomes than those whose reason for admission is unrelated to COVID pneumonia.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Bacterial Community- and Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia in Patients with Critical COVID-19—A Prospective Monocentric Cohort Study
    Lenka Doubravská, Miroslava Htoutou Sedláková, Kateřina Fišerová, Olga Klementová, Radovan Turek, Kateřina Langová, Milan Kolář
    Antibiotics.2024; 13(2): 192.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Awake prone positioning for COVID-19 acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in Tunisia
Khaoula Ben Ismail, Fatma Essafi, Imen Talik, Najla Ben Slimene, Ines Sdiri, Boudour Ben Dhia, Takoua Merhbene
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(3):271-277.   Published online August 21, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00591
  • 1,229 View
  • 108 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
In this study, we explored whether awake prone position (PP) can impact prognosis of severe hypoxemia coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients.
Methods
This was a prospective observational study of severe, critically ill adult COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Patients were divided into two groups: group G1, patients who benefited from a vigilant and effective PP (>4 hours minimum/24) and group G2, control group. We compared demographic, clinical, paraclinical and evolutionary data.
Results
Three hundred forty-nine patients were hospitalized during the study period, 273 met the inclusion criteria. PP was performed in 192 patients (70.3%). The two groups were comparable in terms of demographic characteristics, clinical severity and modalities of oxygenation at intensive care unit (ICU) admission. The mean PaO2/ FIO2 ratios were 141 and 128 mm Hg, respectively (P=0.07). The computed tomography scan was comparable with a critical >75% in 48.5% (G1) versus 54.2% (G2). The median duration of the daily PP session was 13±7 hours per day. The average duration of spontaneous PP days was 7 days (4–19). Use of invasive ventilation was lower in the G1 group (27% vs. 56%, P=0.002). Healthcare-associated infections were significantly lower in G1 (42.1% vs. 82%, P=0.01). Duration of total mechanical ventilation and length of ICU stay were comparable between the two groups. Mortality was significantly higher in G2 (64% vs. 28%, P=0.02).
Conclusions
Our study confirmed that awake PP can improve prognosis in COVID-19 patients. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm this result.
Liver
Alcohol use disorder in the intensive care unit a highly morbid condition, but chemical dependency discussion improves outcomes
Kristin Colling, Alexandra K. Kraft, Melissa L. Harry
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):122-133.   Published online January 10, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00584
  • 1,958 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are common in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) and increase the risk for worse outcomes. In this study, we describe factors associated with patient mortality after ICU admission and the effect of chemical dependency (CD) counseling on outcomes in the year following ICU admission. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed patient demographics, hospital data, and documentation of CD counseling by medical providers for all ICU patients with AUD admitted to our institution between January 2017 and March 2019. Primary outcomes were in-hospital and 1-year mortality. Results: Of the 527 patients with AUD requiring ICU care, median age was 56 years (range, 18–86). Both in-hospital (12%) and 1-year mortality rates (27%) were high. Rural patients, comorbidities, older age, need for mechanical ventilation, and complications were associated with increased risk of in-hospital and 1-year mortality. CD counseling was documented for 73% of patients, and 50% of these patients accepted alcohol treatment or resources prior to discharge. CD evaluation and acceptance was associated with a significantly decreased rate of readmission for liver or alcohol-related issues (36% vs. 58%; odds ratio [OR], 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27–0.61) and 1-year mortality (7% vs. 19.5%; OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.16–0.64). CD evaluation alone, regardless of patient acceptance, was associated with a significantly decreased 1-year post-discharge mortality rate (12% vs. 23%; OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.25–0.77). Conclusions: ICU patients with AUD had high in-hospital and 1-year mortality. CD evaluation, regardless of patient acceptance, was associated with a significant decrease in 1-year mortality
Nutrition
Effect of a nutritional support protocol on enteral nutrition and clinical outcomes of critically ill patients: a retrospective cohort study
Heemoon Park, Sung Yoon Lim, Sebin Kim, Hyung-Sook Kim, Soyeon Kim, Ho Il Yoon, Young-Jae Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):382-390.   Published online July 19, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00220
  • 2,976 View
  • 237 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Enteral nutrition (EN) supply within 48 hours after intensive care unit (ICU) admission improves clinical outcomes. The “new ICU evaluation & development of nutritional support protocol (NICE-NST)” was introduced in an ICU of tertiary academic hospital. This study showed that early EN through protocolized nutritional support would supply more nutrition to improve clinical outcomes.
Methods
This study screened 170 patients and 62 patients were finally enrolled; patients who were supplied nutrition without the protocol were classified as the control group (n=40), while those who were supplied according to the protocol were classified as the test group (n=22).
Results
In the test group, EN started significantly earlier (3.7±0.4 days vs. 2.4±0.5 days, P=0.010). EN calorie (4.0±1.0 kcal/kg vs. 6.7±0.9 kcal/kg, P=0.006) and protein (0.17±0.04 g/kg vs. 0.32±0.04 g/kg, P=0.002) supplied were significantly higher in the test group. Although EN was supplied through continuous feeding in the test group, there was no difference in complications such as feeding hold due to excessive gastric residual volume or vomit, and hyper- or hypo-glycemia between the two groups. Hospital mortality was significantly lower in the group that started EN within 1.5 days (42.9% vs. 11.8%, P=0.018). The proportion of patients who started EN within 1.5 days was higher in the test group (40.9% vs. 17.5%, P=0.044).
Conclusions
The NICE-NST may improve EN supply and mortality of critically ill patients without increasing complications.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Nutritional support for patients with abdominal surgical pathology: the view of a surgeon and an anesthesiologist — opponents or allies?
    Natalya P. Shen, Svetlana Yu. Mukhacheva
    Clinical nutrition and metabolism.2023; 3(4): 181.     CrossRef
  • Provision of Enteral Nutrition in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit: A Multicenter Prospective Observational Study
    Chan-Hee Park, Hak-Jae Lee, Suk-Kyung Hong, Yang-Hee Jun, Jeong-Woo Lee, Nak-Jun Choi, Kyu-Hyouck Kyoung
    Annals of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.2022; 14(2): 66.     CrossRef
Pediatrics
Hearing screening outcomes in pediatric critical care survivors: a 1-year report
Pattita Suwannatrai, Chanapai Chaiyakulsil
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(2):209-216.   Published online March 8, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00899
  • 2,661 View
  • 157 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Hearing loss is a potentially serious complication that can occur after surviving a critical illness. Study on screening for hearing problems in pediatric critical care survivors beyond the neonatal period is lacking. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of abnormal hearing screening outcomes using transitory evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) screening in children who survived critical illness and to find possible associating factors for abnormal hearing screening results.
Methods
This study was a single-center, prospective, observational study. All children underwent otoscopy to exclude external and middle ear abnormalities before undergoing TEOAE screening. The screening was conducted before hospital discharge. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and logistic regression tests were used for data analysis.
Results
A total of 92 children were enrolled. Abnormal TEOAE responses were identified in 26 participants (28.3%). Children with abnormal responses were significantly younger than those with normal responses with a median age of 10.0 months and 43.5 months, respectively (P<0.001). Positive association with abnormal responses was found in children younger than 12 months of age (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06–8.90) and children with underlying genetic conditions (adjusted OR, 6.95; 95% CI, 1.49–32.54).
Conclusions
Our study demonstrates a high prevalence of abnormal TEOAE screening responses in children surviving critical illness, especially in patients younger than 12 months of age. More extensive studies should be performed to identify the prevalence and associated risk factors of hearing problems in critically ill children.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Physiological and electrophysiological evaluation of the hearing system in low birth weight neonates treated with cholestin: a cohort study
    Nastaran Khosravi, Malihah Mazaheryazdi, Majid Kalani, Nasrin Khalesi, Zinat Shakeri, Saeedeh Archang, Maryam Archang
    The Egyptian Journal of Otolaryngology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Ethics
Outcomes of critically ill patients according to the perception of intensivists on the appropriateness of intensive care unit admission
Youjin Chang, Kyoung Ran Kim, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(4):351-360.   Published online November 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00283
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  • 133 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
It is important for intensivists to determine which patient may benefit from intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We aimed to assess the outcomes of patients perceived as non-beneficially or beneficially admitted to the ICU and evaluate whether their prognosis was consistent with the intensivists’ perception.
Methods
A prospective observational study was conducted on patients admitted to the medical ICU of a tertiary referral center between February and April 2014. The perceptions of four intensivists at admission (day 1) and on day 3 were investigated as non-beneficial admission, beneficial admission, or indeterminate state.
Results
A total of 210 patients were enrolled. On days 1 and 3, 22 (10%) and 23 (11%) patients were judged as having non-beneficial admission; 166 (79%) and 159 (79%), beneficial admission; and 22 (10%) and 21 (10%), indeterminate state, respectively. The ICU mortality rates of each group were 64%, 22%, and 57%, respectively; their 6-month mortality rates were 100%, 46%, and 81%, respectively. The perceptions of non-beneficial admission or indeterminate state were the significant predictors of ICU mortality (day 3, odds ratio [OR], 4.049; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.892–8.664; P<0.001) and 6-month mortality (day 1: OR, 4.983; 95% CI, 1.260–19.703; P=0.022; day 3: OR, 4.459; 95% CI, 1.162–17.121; P=0.029).
Conclusions
The outcomes of patients perceived as having non-beneficial admission were extremely poor. The intensivists’ perception was important in predicting patients’ outcomes and was more consistent with long-term prognosis than with immediate outcomes. The intensivists’ role can be reflected in limited ICU resource utilization.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characteristics of critically ill patients with cancer associated with intensivist's perception of inappropriateness of ICU admission: A retrospective cohort study
    Carla Marchini Dias da Silva, Bruno Adler Maccagnan Pinheiro Besen, Antônio Paulo Nassar Jr
    Journal of Critical Care.2024; 79: 154468.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics, ICU Interventions, and Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Palliative Care Triggers in a Mixed Community-Based Intensive Care Unit
    Michele M. Iguina, Aunie M. Danyalian, Ilko Luque, Umair Shaikh, Sanaz B. Kashan, Dionne Morgan, Daniel Heller, Mauricio Danckers
    Journal of Palliative Care.2023; 38(2): 126.     CrossRef
  • Association of appropriateness for ICU admission with resource use, organ support and long-term survival in critically ill cancer patients
    Carla Marchini Dias Silva, Janaina Naiara Germano, Anna Karolyne de Araujo Costa, Giovanna Alves Gennari, Pedro Caruso, Antonio Paulo Nassar Jr
    Internal and Emergency Medicine.2023; 18(4): 1191.     CrossRef
  • Can the intensivists predict the outcomes of critically ill patients on the appropriateness of intensive care unit admission for limited intensive care unit resources ?
    SeungYong Park
    Acute and Critical Care.2021; 36(4): 388.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Impact of prone position on outcomes of COVID-19 patients with spontaneous breathing
Mabrouk Bahloul, Sana Kharrat, Malek Hafdhi, Anis Maalla, Olfa Turki, Kamilia Chtara, Rania Ammar, Basma Suissi, Chokri Ben Hamida, Hedi Chelly, Khaiereddine Ben Mahfoudh, Mounir Bouaziz
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):208-214.   Published online August 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00500
  • 5,166 View
  • 204 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
In this study, we explored whether early application of the prone position (PP) can improve severe hypoxemia and respiratory failure in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with spontaneous breathing.
Methods
This is a prospective observational study of severe, critically ill adult COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit. All vital parameters were recorded in real time for all patients. Moreover, the results of chest computed tomography (CT), when available, were analyzed.
Results
PP was applied in 21 patients who were breathing spontaneously. The application of PP was associated with a significant increase in oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2) from 82%±12% to 96%±3% (P<0.001) 1 hour later. Moreover, PP was associated with a significant reduction in respiratory rate from 31±10 to 21±4 breaths/min (P<0.001). Furthermore, the number of patients who exhibited signs of respiratory distress after PP was reduced from 10 (47%) to 3 (14%) (P=0.04). Early PP application also led to a clear improvement on CT imaging. It was not, however, associated with a reduction in mortality rate or in the use of invasive mechanical ventilation (P>0.05 for both).
Conclusions
Our study confirmed that the early application of PP can improve hypoxemia and tachypnea in COVID-19 patients with spontaneous breathing. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the beneficial effects of PP in COVID-19 patients with spontaneous breathing.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Awake prone positioning for patients with COVID-19-related respiratory failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Mara Graziani, Andrea Galeazzo Rigutini, Diletta Bartolini, Laura Traballi, Lorenzo Luzi, Rossana Regina, Francesco Bossi, Carla Caponi, Cecilia Becattini
    Internal and Emergency Medicine.2024; 19(1): 147.     CrossRef
  • Awake prone positioning for COVID-19 acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in Tunisia
    Khaoula Ben Ismail, Fatma Essafi, Imen Talik, Najla Ben Slimene, Ines Sdiri, Boudour Ben Dhia, Takoua Merhbene
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(3): 271.     CrossRef
  • Gravity-induced ischemia in the brain-and prone positioning for COVID-19 patients breathing spontaneously
    J. Howard Jaster, Giulia Ottaviani
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 131.     CrossRef
  • Gravity-induced ischemia in the brain and prone positioning for COVID-19 patients breathing spontaneously: still far from the truth!
    Mabrouk Bahloul, Sana Kharrat, Kamilia Chtara, Hedi Chelly, Chokri Ben Hamida, Mounir Bouaziz
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 134.     CrossRef
  • A Case of COVID-19 with Acute Exacerbation after Anti-Inflammatory Treatment
    Yugo Ashino, Yoichi Shirato, Masahiro Yaegashiwa, Satoshi Yamanouchi, Noriko Miyakawa, Kokichi Ando, Yumiko Sakurada, Haorile Chagan Yasutan, Toshio Hattori
    Reports.2022; 5(2): 24.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy and safety of prone position in COVID-19 patients with respiratory failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Hyeon-Jeong Lee, Junghyun Kim, Miyoung Choi, Won-Il Choi, Joonsung Joh, Jungeun Park, Joohae Kim
    European Journal of Medical Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Infection
Risk factors for intensive care unit admission and mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients
Ahmed Ayaz, Ainan Arshad, Hajra Malik, Haris Ali, Erfan Hussain, Bushra Jamil
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(4):249-254.   Published online November 11, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00381
  • 6,778 View
  • 217 Download
  • 18 Web of Science
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study investigated the clinical features and outcome of hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients admitted to our quaternary care hospital.
Methods
In this retrospective cohort study, we included all adult patients with COVID-19 infection admitted to a quaternary care hospital in Pakistan from March 1 to April 15, 2020. The extracted variables included demographics, comorbidities, presenting symptoms, laboratory tests and radiological findings during admission. Outcome measures included in-hospital mortality and length of stay.
Results
Sixty-six COVID-19 patients were hospitalized during the study period. Sixty-one percent were male and 39% female; mean age was 50.6±19.1 years. Fever and cough were the most common presenting symptoms. Serial chest X-rays showed bilateral pulmonary opacities in 33 (50%) patients. The overall mortality was 14% and mean length of stay was 8.4±8.9 days. Ten patients (15%) required intensive care unit (ICU) care during admission, of which six (9%) were intubated. Age ≥60 years, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, ICU admission, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio ≥3.3, and international normalized ratio ≥1.2 were associated with increased risk of mortality.
Conclusions
We found a mortality rate of 14% in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. COVID-19 cases are still increasing exponentially around the world and may overwhelm healthcare systems in many countries soon. Our findings can be used for early identification of patients who may require intensive care and aggressive management in order to improve outcomes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Incidence and clinical outcomes of bacterial superinfections in critically ill patients with COVID-19
    Si Mong Yoon, Jinwoo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Hong Yeul Lee
    Frontiers in Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Difference in determinants of ICU admission and death among COVID-19 hospitalized patients in two epidemic waves in Portugal: possible impact of healthcare burden and hospital bed occupancy on clinical management and outcomes, March–December 2020
    Vasco Ricoca Peixoto, André Vieira, Pedro Aguiar, Carlos Carvalho, Daniel Thomas, Paulo Sousa, Carla Nunes, Alexandre Abrantes
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Early Death Among COVID-19 Patients: A Cross-sectional Analysis of the First 10,000 COVID-19 Deaths from the Indian State of Tamil Nadu
    Zarin Pilakkadavath, Janice M. Weinberg, Serin Kuriakose, Shahul H. Ebrahim, Lekha D. Bhat, Bindhya Vijayan, Salman Khan, Soji D. Jose, Premini Rajeev, Jinbert L. Azariah, Shaffi Fazaludeen Koya
    Dr. Sulaiman Al Habib Medical Journal.2023; 5(4): 151.     CrossRef
  • Global prevalence of COVID-19-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis
    Abere Woretaw Azagew, Zerko Wako Beko, Yohannes Mulu Ferede, Habtamu Sewunet Mekonnen, Hailemichael Kindie Abate, Chilot Kassa Mekonnen
    Systematic Reviews.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Drinking patterns, alcoholic beverage types, and esophageal cancer risk in Africa: a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis
    Eugene Jamot Ndebia, Gabriel Tchuente Kamsu
    Frontiers in Oncology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The clinical association between Periodontitis and COVID-19
    Shipra Gupta, Ritin Mohindra, Mohita Singla, Sagar Khera, Vaibhav Sahni, Poonam Kanta, Roop Kishor Soni, Amit Kumar, Krishan Gauba, Kapil Goyal, Mini P. Singh, Arnab Ghosh, Kamal Kajal, Varun Mahajan, Ashish Bhalla, Timo Sorsa, Ismo Räisänen
    Clinical Oral Investigations.2022; 26(2): 1361.     CrossRef
  • Prothrombin time, international normalized rate and in-hospital mortality in COVID-19
    Panagiotis PALIOGIANNIS, Angelo ZINELLU, Arduino A. MANGONI, Antonio PAZZOLA, Francesco L. BANDIERA, Antonio SPANO, Chiara SANNA, Valentina SCANO, Sara S. FOIS, Verdiana MUSCAS, Elena MASOTTO, Stefano DORE, Vito FIORE, Pietro PIRINA, Ciriaco CARRU, Alessa
    Minerva Respiratory Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Patterns of presentation, prevalence and associated factors of mortality in ICU among adult patients during the pandemic of COVID 19: A retrospective cross-sectional study
    Shimelis Seid, Habtu Adane, Getachew Mekete
    Annals of Medicine and Surgery.2022; 77: 103618.     CrossRef
  • Hospital length of stay for COVID-19 patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Yousef Alimohamadi, Elahe Mansouri Yekta, Mojtaba Sepandi, Maedeh Sharafoddin, Maedeh Arshadi, Elahe Hesari
    Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the models generated from clinical features and deep learning-based segmentations: Can thoracic CT on admission help us to predict hospitalized COVID-19 patients who will require intensive care?
    Mutlu Gülbay, Aliye Baştuğ, Erdem Özkan, Büşra Yüce Öztürk, Bökebatur Ahmet Raşit Mendi, Hürrem Bodur
    BMC Medical Imaging.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Characterization and determinant factors of critical illness and in-hospital mortality of COVID-19 patients: A retrospective cohort of 1,792 patients in Kenya
    Isinta M Elijah, Endawoke Amsalu, Xuening Jian, Mingyang Cao, Eric K Mibei, Danvas O Kerosi, Francis G Mwatsahu, Wei Wang, Faith Onyangore, Youxin Wang
    Biosafety and Health.2022; 4(5): 330.     CrossRef
  • SARS-CoV-2-Infection (COVID-19): Clinical Course, Viral Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Cause(s) of Death
    Giuliano Pasquale Ramadori
    Medical Sciences.2022; 10(4): 58.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 related mortality and hospitalization before vaccination: A meta-analysis
    Hannah N. Marmor, Mindy Pike, Zhiguo (Alex) Zhao, Fei Ye, Stephen A. Deppen, Julio Croda
    PLOS Global Public Health.2022; 2(11): e0001187.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors of early mortality among COVID-19 deceased patients in Addis Ababa COVID-19 care centers, Ethiopia
    Taye Ashine Mezgebu, Migbar Mekonnen Sibhat, Melsew Tsegaw Getnet, Kassie Tiruneh Gebeyehu, Wuletaw Zewde Chane, Edmialem Mesfin Getahun, Asaminew Sane Habtamu, Hailu Beyene Asmare, Melke Mengistie Ambaw, Zivanai Cuthbert Chapanduka
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  • Comorbid Asthma Increased the Risk for COVID-19 Mortality in Asia: A Meta-Analysis
    Liqin Shi, Jiahao Ren, Yujia Wang, Huifen Feng, Fang Liu, Haiyan Yang
    Vaccines.2022; 11(1): 89.     CrossRef
  • Outcomes of nutritionally at-risk Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID 19) patients admitted in a tertiary government hospital: A follow-up study of the MalnutriCoV study
    Ramon B. Larrazabal, Harold Henrison C. Chiu, Lia Aileen M. Palileo-Villanueva
    Clinical Nutrition ESPEN.2021; 43: 239.     CrossRef
  • Prognostic value of neutrophil‐to‐lymphocyte ratio in COVID‐19 patients: A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Juan R. Ulloque‐Badaracco, W. Ivan Salas‐Tello, Ali Al‐kassab‐Córdova, Esteban A. Alarcón‐Braga, Vicente A. Benites‐Zapata, Jorge L. Maguiña, Adrian V. Hernandez
    International Journal of Clinical Practice.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A meta-analysis on the risk factors adjusted association between cardiovascular disease and COVID-19 severity
    Jie Xu, Wenwei Xiao, Xuan Liang, Li Shi, Peihua Zhang, Ying Wang, Yadong Wang, Haiyan Yang
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of characteristics and ventilatory course between coronavirus disease 2019 and Middle East respiratory syndrome patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome
    Imran Khalid, Romaysaa M Yamani, Maryam Imran, Muhammad Ali Akhtar, Manahil Imran, Rumaan Gul, Tabindeh Jabeen Khalid, Ghassan Y Wali
    Acute and Critical Care.2021; 36(3): 223.     CrossRef
Energy Deficiency Aggravates Clinical Outcomes of Critically Ill Patients
Hye Kyung Chung, Song Mi Lee, Jae Hoon Lee, Cheung Soo Shin
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2005;20(1):49-53.
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  • 29 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Adequate nutrition support reduces infectious complications, mortality and length of hospitalizationin intensive care unit. However, there are multi factors like frequent null per os (NPO) due to examination, intolerance to tube feeding, complication of TPN (total parenteral nutrition) and ineffective recognition by medical staff. The purpose of this study is to identify detrimental effects of cumulative energy deficiency in critically ill patients.
METHODS
The patients who were received tube feeding or total parenteral nutrition for more than 5 days were investigated. Daily and cumulative energy deficiency was tabulated until oral intake was achieved or until they discharged or died. Patients were divided into two groups, severe energy deficient group (>10, 000 kcal) or mild energy deficient group (<5, 000 kcal). Then we compared clinical outcomes between two groups. RESULTS: Total 150 patients were studied. 48 (32%) patients were severe energy deficient group and 42 (28%) patients were mild energy deficient group. Mortality and nosocomial infection were significantly higher in severe energy deficient group than in mild group. Hospital day and ICU day were significantly higher in severe energy deficient group than in mild group. CONCLUSIONS: Severe energy deficiency was very common in critically ill patients and it deteriorated the clinical outcomes such as mortality, nosocomial infection, hospital day and ICU day.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care