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Original Article
Pulmonary
Comparison of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy and noninvasive ventilation in COVID-19 patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Glenardi Glenardi, Febie Chriestya, Bambang J Oetoro, Ghea Mangkuliguna, Natalia Natalia
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):71-83.   Published online February 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01326
  • 8,586 View
  • 469 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a major adverse event commonly encountered in severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Although noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) has long been used in the management of ARF, it has several adverse events which may cause patient discomfort and lead to treatment complication. Recently, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) has the potential to be an alternative for NIV in adults with ARF, including COVID-19 patients. The objective was to investigate the efficacy of HFNC compared to NIV in COVID-19 patients. Methods: This meta-analysis was reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria. Literature search was carried out in electronic databases for relevant articles published prior to June 2021. The protocol used in this study has been registered in International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (CRD42020225186). Results: Although the success rate of NIV is higher compared to HFNC (odds ratio [OR], 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16–0.97; P=0.04), this study showed that the mortality in the NIV group is also significantly higher compared to HFNC group (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.39–0.63; P<0.001). Moreover, this study also demonstrated that there was no significant difference in intubation rates between the two groups (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 0.86–2.11; P=0.19). Conclusions: Patients treated with HFNC showed better outcomes compared to NIV for ARF due to COVID-19. Therefore, HFNC should be considered prior to NIV in COVID-19–associated ARF. However, further studies with larger sample sizes are still needed to better elucidate the benefit of HFNC in COVID-19 patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • High-flow nasal cannula therapy in patients with COVID-19 in intensive care units in a country with limited resources: a single-center experience
    Anh-Minh Vu Phan, Hai-Yen Thi Hoang, Thanh-Son Truong Do, Trung Quoc Hoang, Thuan Van Phan, Nguyet-Anh Phuong Huynh, Khoi Minh Le
    Journal of International Medical Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluating the use of the respiratory-rate oxygenation index as a predictor of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen failure in COVID-19
    Scott Weerasuriya, Savvas Vlachos, Ahmed Bobo, Namitha Birur Jayaprabhu, Lauren Matthews, Adam R Blackstock, Victoria Metaxa
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • Does the variant positivity and negativity affect the clinical course in COVID-19?: A cohort study
    Erkan Yildirim, Levent Kilickan, Suleyman Hilmi Aksoy, Ramazan Gozukucuk, Hasan Huseyin Kilic, Yakup Tomak, Orhan Dalkilic, Ibrahim Halil Tanboga, Fevzi Duhan Berkan Kilickan
    Medicine.2023; 102(9): e33132.     CrossRef
  • The COVID-19 Driving Force: How It Shaped the Evidence of Non-Invasive Respiratory Support
    Yorschua Jalil, Martina Ferioli, Martin Dres
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(10): 3486.     CrossRef
  • Descriptive account of the first use of the LeVe CPAP System, a new frugal CPAP System, in adult patients with COVID-19 Pneumonitis in Uganda
    Anna Littlejohns, Helen Please, Racheal Musasizi, Stuart Murdoch, Gorret Nampiina, Ian Waters, William Davis Birch, Gregory de Boer, Nikil Kapur, Tumwesigye Ambrozi, Ninsiima Carol, Nakigudde Noel, Jiten Parmar, Peter Culmer, Tom Lawton, Edith Namulema
    Tropical Medicine and Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison between high-flow nasal cannula and noninvasive ventilation in COVID-19 patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Yun Peng, Bing Dai, Hong-wen Zhao, Wei Wang, Jian Kang, Hai-jia Hou, Wei Tan
    Therapeutic Advances in Respiratory Disease.2022; 16: 175346662211136.     CrossRef
  • Does High Flow Nasal Cannula avoid intubation and improve the mortality of adult patients in acute respiratory failure in the intensive care setting, when compared to others methods as Conventional Oxygen Therapy or Non-Invasive Ventilation? A narrative r
    P Fosseur, A Renard, P Mateu, J Rosman
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica.2022; 73(Supplement): 97.     CrossRef
Case Report
Pulmonary
Successful noninvasive ventilation in a severely acidotic and hypercapnic comatose COVID-19 patient with multiple comorbidities: a case report
Joseph Abraham Poonuraparampil, Habib Md Reazaul Karim, Manu P Kesavankutty, Porika Prashanth Nayak
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):120-123.   Published online November 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00983
  • 3,884 View
  • 198 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Effective use of noninvasive ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is well-known. However, noninvasive ventilation in patients presenting with altered sensorium and severe acidosis (pH <7.1) has been rarely described. Invasive mechanical ventilation is associated with high mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and use of noninvasive ventilation over invasive ventilation is an area of investigation. We report a case of COVID-19-induced acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a 66-year-old male. His past medical history included obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, cor pulmonale, atrial fibrillation, and amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism. On presentation, he had acute hypercapnic respiratory failure, severe acidosis (partial pressure of carbon dioxide [PCO2], 147 mm Hg; pH, 7.06), and altered mentation. The patient was successfully managed with noninvasive ventilation, avoiding endotracheal intubation, invasive ventilation, and related complications. Although precarious, a trial of noninvasive ventilation can be considered in COVID-19-induced acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with hypercapnic respiratory failure, severe acidosis, and altered mentation.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Lipid Emulsion-Mediated Improvement of Hemodynamic Depression Caused by Amlodipine Toxicity
    Ju-Tae Sohn
    Pediatric Emergency Care.2023; 39(3): 205.     CrossRef
Original Article
Pulmonary
Utilization of pain and sedation therapy on noninvasive mechanical ventilation in Korean intensive care units: a multi-center prospective observational study
Taehee Kim, Jung Soo Kim, Eun Young Choi, Youjin Chang, Won-Il Choi, Jae-Joon Hwang, Jae Young Moon, Kwangha Lee, Sei Won Kim, Hyung Koo Kang, Yun Su Sim, Tai Sun Park, Seung Yong Park, Sunghoon Park, Jae Hwa Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(4):255-262.   Published online November 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00164
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2021;36(2):172
  • 6,243 View
  • 232 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The use of sedative drugs may be an important therapeutic intervention during noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in intensive care units (ICUs). The purpose of this study was to assess the current application of analgosedation in NIV and its impact on clinical outcomes in Korean ICUs.
Methods
Twenty Korean ICUs participated in the study, and data was collected on NIV use during the period between June 2017 and February 2018. Demographic data from all adult patients, NIV clinical parameters, and hospital mortality were included.
Results
A total of 155 patients treated with NIV in the ICUs were included, of whom 26 received pain and sedation therapy (sedation group) and 129 did not (control group). The primary cause of ICU admission was due to acute exacerbation of obstructed lung disease (45.7%) in the control group and pneumonia treatment (53.8%) in the sedation group. In addition, causes of NIV application included acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in the control group (62.8%) and post-extubation respiratory failure in the sedation group (57.7%). Arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels before and after 2 hours of NIV treatment were significantly decreased in both groups: from 61.9±23.8 mm Hg to 54.9±17.6 mm Hg in the control group (P<0.001) and from 54.9±15.1 mm Hg to 51.1±15.1 mm Hg in the sedation group (P=0.048). No significant differences were observed in the success rate of NIV weaning, complications, length of ICU stay, ICU survival rate, or hospital survival rate between the groups.
Conclusions
In NIV patients, analgosedation therapy may have no harmful effects on complications, NIV weaning success, and mortality compared to the control group. Therefore, sedation during NIV may not be unsafe and can be used in patients for pain control when indicated.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sedation and analgesia strategies for non-invasive mechanical ventilation: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Baolu Yang, Leyi Gao, Zhaohui Tong
    Heart & Lung.2024; 63: 42.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Music Therapy and Sound Isolation on the Comfort of Mechanically Ventilated Patients
    Sinem Çalışkan, Esra Akın, Mehmet Uyar
    Turkish Journal of Intensive Care.2024; 22(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • 2021 KSCCM clinical practice guidelines for pain, agitation, delirium, immobility, and sleep disturbance in the intensive care unit
    Yijun Seo, Hak-Jae Lee, Eun Jin Ha, Tae Sun Ha
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Comfort During Non-invasive Ventilation
    Gianmaria Cammarota, Rachele Simonte, Edoardo De Robertis
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current status of treatment of acute respiratory failure in Korea
    Yong Jun Choi, Jae Hwa Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 124.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: noninvasive mechanical ventilation
    Sunghoon Park
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 144.     CrossRef
  • Dexmedetomidine-Induced Aortic Contraction Involves Transactivation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Rats
    Soo Hee Lee, Seong-Chun Kwon, Seong-Ho Ok, Seung Hyun Ahn, Sung Il Bae, Ji-Yoon Kim, Yeran Hwang, Kyeong-Eon Park, Mingu Kim, Ju-Tae Sohn
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(8): 4320.     CrossRef
Review
Mechanical Ventilation in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Tae Hun An
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2003;18(2):67-73.
  • 2,528 View
  • 159 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may require mechanical ventilation following cardiac or general surgery, in connection with thoracic surgery such as lobectomy, wedge resection, lung reduction or bullectomy, during an episode of acute respiratory failure (ARF) secondary to a disease other than COPD such as sepsis, drug overdose, or trauma or for acute-on-chronic respiratory failure (the COPD exacerbation) where acute illness, usually presumed to be infectious in nature, destabilizes the characteristically compensated state. Ventilatory intervention is often life-saving when patients with asthma or COPD experience acute respiratory compromise. Although both noninvasive and invasive ventilation methods may be viable initial choice, which is better depends upon the severity of illness, the rapidity of response, coexisting disease, and capacity of the medical environment. In addition, noninvasive ventilation often relieves dyspnea and hypoxemia in patients with stable severe COPD. This review will only briefly cover noninvasive ventilation and focus primarily on the management of the intubated, mechanically ventilated patient with COPD, with particular emphasis on factors unique to this patient population such as the propensity for dynamic hyperinflation and auto-PEEP, barotrauma, difficult weaning and the prognosis following mechanical ventilation.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care