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Original Article
Pulmonary
The Usefulness of Intensivist-Performed Bedside Drainage of Pleural Effusion via Ultrasound-Guided Pigtail Catheter
Joo Won Min, Joon Young Ohm, Byung Seok Shin, Jun Wan Lee, Sang Il Park, Seok Hwa Yoon, Yong Sup Shin, Dong Il Park, Chaeuk Chung, Jae Young Moon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(3):177-182.   Published online August 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.3.177
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
There has been little data reporting the usefulness of intensivist-performed bedside drainage of pleural effusion via ultrasound (US)-guided pigtail catheter. The objective of this study is to clarify the usefulness and safety of these methods in comparison with radiologist-performed procedures.
METHODS
Data of patients with pleural effusion treated with US-guided pigtail catheter drainage were analyzed. All procedures were performed from September 2012 to September. 2013 by a well-trained intensivist or radiologist.
RESULTS
Pleural effusion was drained in 25 patients in 33 sessions. A radiologist performed 21 sessions, and an intensivist performed 12 sessions. Procedures during mechanical ventilation were performed in 15 (71.4%) patients by a radiologist and in 10 (83.3%) by an intensivist (p = 0.678). The success rate was not significantly different in radiologist- and intensivist-performed procedures, 95.2% (20/21) and 83.3% (10/12), respectively (p = 0.538). The average duration for procedures (including in-hospital transfer) was longer in radiologist-performed cases (p = 0.001). Although the results are limited because of the small population size, aggravation of oxygenation, CO2 retention, and decrease of mean arterial blood pressure were not statistically different in the groups. Pigtail-associated complications including hemothorax, pneumothorax, hepatic perforation, empyema, kink in the catheter, and subcutaneous hematoma were not found.
CONCLUSIONS
Intensivist-performed bedside drainage of pleural effusion via ultrasound (US)-guided pigtail catheter is useful and safe and may be recommended in some patients in an intensive care unit.
Case Report
Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumothorax Occurred during Patient Transfer to Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report
Yoonki Lee, Won Young Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2004;19(1):52-56.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
A 48 years old female patient was scheduled for emergency surgery due to bleeding after intracerebral aneurysmal clipping under general anesthesia. Previously checked chest X-ray taken just a few hours before surgery showed no abnormal finding and she didn't show any sign of pneumothorax or hemothorax including dyspnea, tachypnea or cyanosis. Surgery was uneventful. After the completion of surgery, patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit with intubation. During transfer, patient showed bucking and signs of subcutaneous emphysema around chest, shoulder and face. Oxygen saturation was low when she admitted to the neurosurgical intensive care unit, so the ventilator care was started. The patient's oxygenation were getting worse progressively, so we checked chest AP several times and one of the chest X-ray taken at that time revealed no vascular and lung marking on the left lung field suggesting pneumothorax. Emergency chest tube drainage was performed. She recovered dramatically and three days later, ches X-ray showed the complete resorption of the pneumothorax.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care