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5 "Dong Hun Lee"
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CPR/Resuscitation
Association between C-reactive protein-to-albumin ratio and 6-month mortality in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Hui Hwan Kim, Ji Ho Lee, Dong Hun Lee, Byung Kook Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):601-609.   Published online August 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00542
  • 2,453 View
  • 120 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
The inflammatory response that occurs following cardiac arrest can determine the long-term prognosis of patients who survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We evaluated the correlation between C-reactive protein-to-albumin ratio (CAR) following cardiac arrest and long-term mortality. Methods: The current retrospective observational study examined patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) treated with targeted temperature management at a single tertiary care hospital. We measured CAR at four time points (at admission and then 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after) following cardiac arrest. The primary outcome was the patients’ 6-month mortality. We performed multivariable and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analyses to investigate the relationship between CAR and 6-month mortality. Results: Among the 115 patients, 52 (44.1%) died within 6 months. In the multivariable analysis, CAR at 48 hours (odds ratio [OR], 1.130; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.027–1.244) and 72 hours (OR, 1.241; 95% CI, 1.059–1.455) after cardiac arrest was independently associated with 6-month mortality. The AUCs of CAR at admission and 24, 48, and 72 hours after cardiac arrest for predicting 6-month mortality were 0.583 (95% CI, 0.489–0.673), 0.622 (95% CI, 0.528–0.710), 0.706 (95% CI, 0.615–0.786), and 0.762 (95% CI, 0.675–0.835), respectively. Conclusions: CAR at 72 hours after cardiac arrest was an independent predictor for long-term mortality in patients with PCAS.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Inflammatory response after out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest—Impact on outcome and organ failure development
    Asser M. J. Seppä, Markus B. Skrifvars, Pirkka T. Pekkarinen
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica.2023; 67(9): 1273.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Prognostic Performance between Procalcitonin and Procalcitonin-to-Albumin Ratio in Post Cardiac Arrest Syndrome
    Ju Hee Yoon, Woo Sung Choi, Yong Su Lim, Jae Ho Jang
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(14): 4568.     CrossRef
  • C-reactive protein-to-albumin ratio as a biomarker in patients with sepsis: a novel LASSO-COX based prognostic nomogram
    Xin Zhou, Shouzhi Fu, Yisi Wu, Zhenhui Guo, Wankang Dian, Huibin Sun, Youxia Liao
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
CPR/Resuscitation
Is two-dimensional echocardiography better than electrocardiography for predicting patient outcomes after cardiac arrest?
Dong Ki Kim, Yong Soo Cho, Joochan Kim, Byung Kook Lee, Dong Hun Lee, Eujene Jung, Jeong Mi Moon, Byeong Jo Chun
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):37-45.   Published online December 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00773
  • 5,122 View
  • 163 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Coronary artery stenosis increases hospital mortality and leads to poor neurological recovery in cardiac arrest (CA) patients. However, electrocardiography (ECG) cannot fully predict the presence of coronary artery stenosis in CA patients. Hence, we aimed to determine whether regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA), as observed by two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE), predicted patient survival outcomes with greater accuracy than did ST segment elevation (STE) on ECG in CA patients who underwent coronary angiography (CAG) after return of spontaneous circulation.
Methods
This was a retrospective observational study of adult patients with CA of presumed cardiac etiology who underwent CAG at a single tertiary care hospital. We investigated whether RWMA observed on 2DE predicted patient outcomes more accurately than did STE observed on ECG. The primary outcome was incidence of hospital mortality. The secondary outcomes were Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Category scores measured 6 months after discharge and significant coronary artery stenosis on CAG.
Results
Among the 145 patients, 36 (24.8%) experienced in-hospital death. In multivariable analysis of survival outcomes, only total arrest time (P=0.011) and STE (P=0.035) were significant. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI), which were obtained by adjusting the total arrest time for survival outcomes, were significant only for STE (OR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.17–0.94). The presence of RWMA was not a significant factor.
Conclusions
While STE predicted survival outcomes in adult CA patients, RWMA did not. The decision to perform CAG after CA should include ECG under existing guidelines. The use of RWMA has limited benefits in treatment of this population.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Just the Facts: Management of return of spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
    Hashim Kareemi, Ariel Hendin, Christian Vaillancourt
    Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine.2023; 25(7): 580.     CrossRef
Trauma
The association between the initial lactate level and need for massive transfusion in severe trauma patients with and without traumatic brain injury
Young Hoon Park, Dong Hyun Ryu, Byung Kook Lee, Dong Hun Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(4):255-262.   Published online November 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00640
  • 4,954 View
  • 134 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Exsanguination is a major cause of death in severe trauma patients. The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic impact of the initial lactate level for massive transfusion (MT) in severe trauma. We divided patients according to subgroups of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and non-TBI.
Methods
This single-institution retrospective study was conducted on patients who were admitted to hospital for severe trauma between January 2016 and December 2017. TBI was defined by a head Abbreviated Injury Scale ≥3. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to analyze the prognostic impact of the lactate level. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between the MT and lactate level. The primary outcome was MT.
Results
Of the 553 patients, MT was performed in 62 patients (11.2%). The area under the curve (AUC) for the lactate level for predicting MT was 0.779 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.742 to 0.813). The AUCs for lactate level in the TBI and non-TBI patients were 0.690 (95% CI, 0.627 to 0.747) and 0.842 (95% CI, 0.796 to 0.881), respectively. In multivariate analyses, the lactate level was independently associated with the MT (odds ratio [OR], 1.179; 95% CI, 1.070 to 1.299). The lactate level was independently associated with MT in non-TBI patients (OR, 1.469; 95% CI, 1.262 to 1.710), but not in TBI patients.
Conclusions
The initial lactate level may be a possible prognostic factor for MT in severe trauma. In TBI patients, however, the initial lactate level was not suitable for predicting MT.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of initial lactate levels and red blood cell transfusion strategy with outcomes after severe trauma: a post hoc analysis of the RESTRIC trial
    Yoshinori Kosaki, Takashi Hongo, Mineji Hayakawa, Daisuke Kudo, Shigeki Kushimoto, Takashi Tagami, Hiromichi Naito, Atsunori Nakao, Tetsuya Yumoto
    World Journal of Emergency Surgery.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Cardiology/Emergency
Five-year Experience of Extracorporeal Life Support in Emergency Physicians
Yong Soo Cho, Kyoung Hwan Song, Byung Kook Lee, Kyung Woon Jeung, Yong Hun Jung, Dong Hun Lee, Sung Min Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):52-59.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00885
  • 7,195 View
  • 154 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to present our 5-year experience of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) performed by emergency physicians.
Methods
We retrospectively analyzed 58 patients who underwent ECPR between January 2010 and December 2014. The primary parameter analyzed was survival to hospital discharge. The secondary parameters analyzed were neurologic outcome at hospital discharge, cannulation time, and ECPR-related complications.
Results
Thirty-one patients (53.4%) were successfully weaned from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and 18 (31.0%) survived to hospital discharge. Twelve patients (20.7%) were discharged with good neurologic outcomes. The median cannulation time was 25.0 min (interquartile range 20.0-31.0 min). Nineteen patients (32.8%) had ECPR-related complications, the most frequent being distal limb ischemia. Regarding the initial presentation, 52 patients (83.9%) collapsed due to a cardiac etiology, and acute myocardial infarction (33/62, 53.2%) was the most common cause of cardiac arrest.
Conclusions
The survival to hospital discharge rate for cardiac arrest patients who underwent ECPR conducted by an emergency physician was within the acceptable limits. The cannulation time and complications following ECPR were comparable to those found in previous studies.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation location, coronary angiography and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
    Yoonjic Kim, Jeong Ho Park, Sun Young Lee, Young Sun Ro, Ki Jeong Hong, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin
    The American Journal of Emergency Medicine.2023; 64: 142.     CrossRef
  • Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: time-dependent propensity score-sequential matching analysis from a nationwide population-based registry
    Yeongho Choi, Jeong Ho Park, Joo Jeong, Yu Jin Kim, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin
    Critical Care.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Time from arrest to extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival after out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest
    Jeong Ho Park, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin, Young Sun Ro, Ki Jeong Hong
    Emergency Medicine Australasia.2019; 31(6): 1073.     CrossRef
  • Pre-hospital extra-corporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation
    Ben Singer, Joshua C. Reynolds, David J. Lockey, Ben O’Brien
    Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Report
Neurology
Malignant Syndrome in Parkinson Disease Similar to Severe Infection
Dong Hun Lee, Jeong Mi Moon, Yong Soo Cho
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(4):359-362.   Published online December 29, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00087
  • 16,578 View
  • 202 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
A 70-year-old woman with Parkinson disease was admitted to the emergency department with altered consciousness, fever and convulsive movements without experiencing withdrawal from antiparkinsonian medication. Six hours after the emergency department visit, the patient had a hyperpyrexia (>40°C) and a systolic blood pressure of 40 mmHg. There was no evidence of bacterial infection based on extensive workups. The patient was discharged without aggravation of Parkinson disease symptoms after treatment that included administration of dantrolene sodium, enforcement of continuous renal replacement therapy and cooling blankets. Malignant syndrome should be suspected if high fever occurs in Parkinson disease patients without evidence of a definitive infection.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Parkinsonism-Hyperpyrexia Syndrome and Dyskinesia-Hyperpyrexia Syndrome in Parkinson’s Disease: Two Cases and Literature Review
    Jian-Yong Wang, Jie-Fan Huang, Shi-Guo Zhu, Shi-Shi Huang, Rong-Pei Liu, Bei-Lei Hu, Jian-Hong Zhu, Xiong Zhang
    Journal of Parkinson's Disease.2022; 12(6): 1727.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care