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Pulmonary
Association between mechanical power and intensive care unit mortality in Korean patients under pressure-controlled ventilation
Jae Kyeom Sim, Sang-Min Lee, Hyung Koo Kang, Kyung Chan Kim, Young Sam Kim, Yun Seong Kim, Won-Yeon Lee, Sunghoon Park, So Young Park, Ju-Hee Park, Yun Su Sim, Kwangha Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jin Hwa Lee, Heung Bum Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Ji Young Hong, Won Jun Song, Gee Young Suh
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):91-99.   Published online January 26, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00871
  • 840 View
  • 93 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Mechanical power (MP) has been reported to be associated with clinical outcomes. Because the original MP equation is derived from paralyzed patients under volume-controlled ventilation, its application in practice could be limited in patients receiving pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV). Recently, a simplified equation for patients under PCV was developed. We investigated the association between MP and intensive care unit (ICU) mortality. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of Korean data from the Fourth International Study of Mechanical Ventilation. We extracted data of patients under PCV on day 1 and calculated MP using the following simplified equation: MPPCV = 0.098 ∙ respiratory rate ∙ tidal volume ∙ (ΔPinsp + positive end-expiratory pressure), where ΔPinsp is the change in airway pressure during inspiration. Patients were divided into survivors and non-survivors and then compared. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine association between MPPCV and ICU mortality. The interaction of MPPCV and use of neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) was also analyzed. Results: A total of 125 patients was eligible for final analysis, of whom 38 died in the ICU. MPPCV was higher in non-survivors (17.6 vs. 26.3 J/min, P<0.001). In logistic regression analysis, only MPPCV was significantly associated with ICU mortality (odds ratio, 1.090; 95% confidence interval, 1.029–1.155; P=0.003). There was no significant effect of the interaction between MPPCV and use of NMBA on ICU mortality (P=0.579). Conclusions: MPPCV is associated with ICU mortality in patients mechanically ventilated with PCV mode, regardless of NMBA use.
Pulmonary
Development of a prognostic scoring system in patients with pneumonia requiring ventilator care for more than 4 days: a single-center observational study
Yeseul Oh, Yewon Kang, Kwangha Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):46-53.   Published online February 17, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00787
  • 5,330 View
  • 117 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The aim of the present study was to develop a prognostic model using demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and clinical variables measured on day 4 of mechanical ventilation (MV) for patients with prolonged acute mechanical ventilation (PAMV; MV for >96 hours).
Methods
Data from 437 patients (70.9% male; median age, 68 years) were obtained over a period of 9 years. All patients were diagnosed with pneumonia. Binary logistic regression identified factors predicting mortality at 90 days after the start of MV. A PAMV prognosis score was calculating ß-coefficient values and assigning points to variables.
Results
The overall 90-day mortality rate was 47.1%. Five factors (age ≥65 years, body mass index <18.5 kg/m2, hemato-oncologic diseases as comorbidities, requirement for vasopressors on day 4 of MV and requirement for neuromuscular blocking agents on day 4 of MV) were identified as prognostic indicators. Each factor was valued as +1 point, and used to develop a PAMV prognosis score. This score showed acceptable discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.695 for mortality, 95% confidence interval 0.650–0.738, p<0.001), and calibration (Hosmer–Lemeshow chi-square=6.331, with df 7 and p=0.502). The cutoff value for predicting mortality based on the maximum Youden index was ≤2 (sensitivity, 87.5%; specificity, 41.3%). For patients with PAMV scores ≤1, 2, 3 and ≥4, the 90-day mortality rates were 29.2%, 45.7%, 67.9%, and 90.9%, respectively (P<0.001).
Conclusions
Our study developed a PAMV prognosis score for predicting 90-day mortality. Further research is needed to validate the utility of this score.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Ability of the modified NUTRIC score to predict mortality in patients requiring short-term versus prolonged acute mechanical ventilation: a retrospective cohort study
    Wanho Yoo, Hyojin Jang, Hayoung Seong, Saerom Kim, Soo Han Kim, Eun-Jung Jo, Jung Seop Eom, Kwangha Lee
    Therapeutic Advances in Respiratory Disease.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between mechanical power and intensive care unit mortality in Korean patients under pressure-controlled ventilation
    Jae Kyeom Sim, Sang-Min Lee, Hyung Koo Kang, Kyung Chan Kim, Young Sam Kim, Yun Seong Kim, Won-Yeon Lee, Sunghoon Park, So Young Park, Ju-Hee Park, Yun Su Sim, Kwangha Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jin Hwa Lee, Heung Bum Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Ji Young Hong
    Acute and Critical Care.2024; 39(1): 91.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Clinical outcomes of difficult-to-wean patients with ventilator dependency at intensive care unit discharge
Jung Mo Lee, Sun-Min Lee, Joo Han Song, Young Sam Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(3):156-163.   Published online August 19, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00199
  • 4,732 View
  • 154 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Ventilator-dependent patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who are difficult to wean from invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) have been increasing in number. However, data on the clinical outcomes of difficult-to-wean patients are lacking. We aimed to evaluate clinical outcomes in patients discharged from the ICU with tracheostomy and ventilator dependency.
Methods
We retrospectively investigated clinical course and survival in patients requiring home mechanical ventilation (HMV) with a tracheostomy and difficulty weaning from IMV during medical ICU admission from September 2013 through August 2016 at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea.
Results
Of 84 difficult-to-wean patients who were started on HMV in the medical ICU, 72 survived, were discharged from the ICU, and were included in this analysis. HMV was initiated after a median of 23 days of IMV, and the successful weaning rate was 46% (n=33). In-hospital mortality rate was significantly lower in the successfully weaned group than the unsuccessfully weaned group (0% vs. 23.1%, respectively; P=0.010). Weaning rates were similar according to primary diagnosis, but high body mass index (BMI), low Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score at ICU admission, and absence of neuromuscular disease were associated with weaning success. After a median follow-up of 4.6 months (range, 1–27 months) for survivors, 3-month (n=64) and 6-month (n=59) survival rates were 82.5% and 72.2%, respectively. Survival rates were higher in the successfully weaned group than the unsuccessfully weaned group at 3 months (96.4% vs. 69.0%; P=0.017) and 6 months (84.0% vs. 62.1%; P=0.136) following ICU discharge.
Conclusions
In summary, 46% of patients who started HMV were successfully weaned from the ventilator in general wards. High BMI, low APACHE II score, and absence of neuromuscular disease were factors associated with weaning success.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Long-Term Mortality in Critically Ill Tracheostomized Patients Based on Home Mechanical Ventilation at Discharge
    Won-Young Kim, Moon Seong Baek
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2021; 11(12): 1257.     CrossRef
  • Year 2020 in review - Post‑acute intensive care
    J Djakow
    Anesteziologie a intenzivní medicína.2020; 31(6): 305.     CrossRef
Analysis of the Description of Ventilator Parameters in Recent Papers Relating Artificial Ventilation Using Anesthesia Machine
Jiyeon Sim, Hee Yeon Park, Wonsik Ahn
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2007;22(1):7-14.
  • 1,631 View
  • 38 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Procedures in medical papers should be described in sufficient detail to allow other researchers to reproduce the results. The apparatus including anesthesia machine should be given, too. Anesthesia machine has dramatically improved as bioengineering has developed. There are several ventilator settings in modern anesthesia machines. However, it seems that only a few ventilator settings are described even though modern ventilators are used in research. The purpose of this study is to investigate that how many ventilator parameters were described in the papers of the Korean Journal of Anesthesiology from 2001 to 2006. METHODS: All of papers with human general anesthesia were reviewed except case reports, and papers regarding only induction or intubation procedures. Recruited articles were grouped into papers with strongly related to respiratory parameters (STP), and into ones with slightly related to them based on the research topics. The description of following categories was counted in each paper; the type of anesthesia machine, tidal volume, respiratory rate, inspiratory:expiratory ratio, mode of ventilation, pressure set in pressure targeted ventilation, positive end expiratory pressure, inspiratory pause, and inspiratory rising rate. RESULTS: The description rate of each parameters in STP were 36% in the type of anesthesia machine, 66% in tidal volume, 54% in respiratory rate, and 24% in inspiratory:expiratory ratio. The other settings were seldomly mentioned. CONCLUSIONS: Description on the ventilator parameters was sometimes missed. We should describe adequate ventilator settings to reproduce the results because the modern anesthesia machine has additional ventilator options.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care