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2 "abdominal compartment syndrome"
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Review Article
Trauma
Abdominal compartment syndrome in critically ill patients
Hyunseok Jang, Naa Lee, Euisung Jeong, Yunchul Park, Younggoun Jo, Jungchul Kim, Dowan Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(4):399-408.   Published online November 29, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01263
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Intra-abdominal hypertension can have severe consequences, including abdominal compartment syndrome, which can contribute to multi-organ failure. An increase in intra-abdominal hypertension is influenced by factors such as diminished abdominal wall compliance, increased intraluminal content, and certain systemic conditions. Regular measurement of intra-abdominal pressure is essential, and particular attention must be paid to patient positioning. Nonsurgical treatments, such as decompression of intraluminal content using a nasogastric tube, percutaneous drainage, and fluid balance optimization, play crucial roles. Additionally, point-of-care ultrasonography aids in the diagnosis and treatment of intra-abdominal hypertension. Emphasizing the importance of regular measurements, timely decompressive laparotomy is a definitive, but complex, treatment option. Balancing the urgency of surgical intervention against potential postoperative complications is challenging.
Case Report
Trauma/Surgery
Secondary Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Recognized in Operating Room in Severely Injured Patients
Seok Hwa Youn, John Cook-Jong Lee, Kyoungwon Jung, Jonghwan Moon, Yo Huh, Younghwan Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(1):58-62.   Published online February 29, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.1.58
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AbstractAbstract PDF
For trauma patients with severe shock, massive fluid resuscitation is necessary. However, shock and a large amount of fluid can cause bowel and retroperitoneal edema, which sometimes leads to abdominal compartment syndrome in patients without abdomino-pelvic injury. If other emergent operations except intraabdomen are needed, a distended abdomen is likely to be recognized late, leading to multiple organ dysfunction. Herein, we report two cases of a 23-year-old woman who was in a car accident and a 53-year old man who was pressed on his leg by a pressing machine; severe brain swelling and popliteal vessel injury were diagnosed, respectively. They were both in severe shock and massive fluid resuscitation was required in the emergency department. Distended abdomen was recognized in both the female and male patients immediately after neurosurgical operation and immediately before orthopaedic operation in the operating room, respectively. Decompressive laparotomy revealed massive ascites with retroperitoneal edema.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care