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Guideline
Pulmonary
Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Young-Jae Cho, Jae Young Moon, Ein-Soon Shin, Je Hyeong Kim, Hoon Jung, So Young Park, Ho Cheol Kim, Yun Su Sim, Chin Kook Rhee, Jaemin Lim, Seok Jeong Lee, Won-Yeon Lee, Hyun Jeong Lee, Sang Hyun Kwak, Eun Kyeong Kang, Kyung Soo Chung, Won-Il Choi, The Korean Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Consensus Group
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(2):76-100.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.76
  • 16,740 View
  • 351 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between mechanical power and intensive care unit mortality in Korean patients under pressure-controlled ventilation
    Jae Kyeom Sim, Sang-Min Lee, Hyung Koo Kang, Kyung Chan Kim, Young Sam Kim, Yun Seong Kim, Won-Yeon Lee, Sunghoon Park, So Young Park, Ju-Hee Park, Yun Su Sim, Kwangha Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jin Hwa Lee, Heung Bum Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Ji Young Hong
    Acute and Critical Care.2024; 39(1): 91.     CrossRef
  • Predicting factors associated with prolonged intensive care unit stay of patients with COVID-19
    Won Ho Han, Jae Hoon Lee, June Young Chun, Young Ju Choi, Youseok Kim, Mira Han, Jee Hee Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(1): 41.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: invasive mechanical ventilation
    Young Sam Kim
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 151.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Jin-Young Kim, Sang-Bum Hong
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 157.     CrossRef
  • Prolonged glucocorticoid treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome – Authors' reply
    Rob Mac Sweeney, Daniel F McAuley
    The Lancet.2017; 389(10078): 1516.     CrossRef
  • Prolonged Glucocorticoid Treatment in ARDS: Impact on Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness
    Gianfranco Umberto Meduri, Andreas Schwingshackl, Greet Hermans
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Reports
Cardiology
Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava Detected Incidentally after Pulmonary Artery Catheterization
Hyun Jeong Lee, Namo Kim, Hyelin Lee, Jae Kwang Shim, Jong Wook Song
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2015;30(1):22-26.   Published online February 28, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2015.30.1.22
  • 8,553 View
  • 80 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
We present a case of pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) placement through the right internal jugular vein, bridging vein and coronary sinus in a patient with previously unrecognized persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) and diminutive right superior vena cava. A 61-year-old male patient was scheduled for mitral valve repair for regurgitation. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed dilated coronary sinus, but no further evaluations were performed. During advancement of the PAC, right ventricular and pulmonary arterial pressure tracing was observed at 50 and 60 cm, respectively. Transesophageal echocardiography ruled out intracardiac knotting and revealed the presence of the PAC in the LSVC, entering the right ventricle from the coronary sinus. Diminutive right superior vena cava was observed after sternotomy. The PAC was left in place for 2 days postoperatively without any complications. This case emphasizes that the possibility of LSVC and associated anomalies should always be ruled out in patients with dilated coronary sinus.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Concept and Building of a Simulation Device to Check the Cardiac Output Measurement Through the Pulmonary Artery Catheter
    Caio Francisco Ternus de Abreu, Bernardo Ternus de Abreu
    Biomedical Materials & Devices.2024; 2(2): 968.     CrossRef
  • Transthoracic Echocardiography–Guided Placement of a Pulmonary Artery Catheter in a Patient With a Known Persistent Left but Unknown Absent Right Superior Vena Cava
    Jenna L. Leclerc, Raymond Clemes, Cristina Fuss, Conrad J. Macon, Peter M. Schulman
    Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pharmacology
Green Urine after Propofol Infusion in the Intensive Care Unit
Min Jeong Lee, Hyun Jeong Lee, Jeong Min Kim, Shin Ok Koh, Eun Ho Kim, Sungwon Na
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(4):328-330.   Published online November 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.4.328
  • 8,529 View
  • 109 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Urine discoloration occurs in the intensive care unit (ICU) due to many causes such as medications, metabolic disorders, and infections. Propofol is advocated as one of the first line sedatives in the ICU, but it is not well known to the intensivists that propofol can induce urine color change. We experienced two cases of green urine after propofol infusion. Propofol should be warranted as the cause of urine discoloration during ICU stay.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • An unusual instance of propofol-triggered green urine in anesthesia management: A case report
    Madhusoodan M Gonenavar, Sudhanshu Shukla, Tejashree Sridhar, Rashmi Prasad, Rudresh Tabali
    MGM Journal of Medical Sciences.2024; 11(1): 165.     CrossRef
  • Propofol-Associated Urine Discoloration: Systematic Literature Review
    Ana Lasica, Cinzia Cortesi, Gregorio P. Milani, Mario G. Bianchetti, Federica M. Schera, Pietro Camozzi, Sebastiano A.G. Lava
    Pharmacology.2023; 108(5): 415.     CrossRef
  • Green urine after general anesthesia with propofol: different responses in the same patient -A case report-
    Go Eun Kim, Dae Yoon Kim, Doek Kyu Yoo, Jong-Hwan Lee, Sangmin Maria Lee, Jeong Jin Min
    Anesthesia and Pain Medicine.2017; 12(1): 32.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care