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8 "Ho Cheol Kim"
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Original Article
Hematology
Characteristics and Clinical Outcomes of Critically Ill Cancer Patients Admitted to Korean Intensive Care Units
Soo Jin Na, Tae Sun Ha, Younsuck Koh, Gee Young Suh, Shin Ok Koh, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Young-Joo Lee, Seok Chan Kim, Gyu Rak Chon, Je Hyeong Kim, Jae Yeol Kim, Jaemin Lim, Sunghoon Park, Ho Cheol Kim, Jin Hwa Lee, Ji Hyun Lee, Jisook Park, Juhee Cho, Kyeongman Jeon
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(3):121-129.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00143
  • 8,148 View
  • 272 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcomes of critically ill cancer patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) in Korea.
Methods
This was a retrospective cohort study that analyzed prospective collected data from the Validation of Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 (SAPS3) in Korean ICU (VSKI) study, which is a nationwide, multicenter, and prospective study that considered 5,063 patients from 22 ICUs in Korea over a period of 7 months. Among them, patients older than 18 years of age who were diagnosed with solid or hematologic malignancies prior to admission to the ICU were included in the present study.
Results
During the study period, a total of 1,762 cancer patients were admitted to the ICUs and 833 of them were deemed eligible for analysis. Six hundred fifty-eight (79%) had solid tumors and 175 (21%) had hematologic malignancies, respectively. Respiratory problems (30.1%) was the most common reason leading to ICU admission. Patients with hematologic malignancies had higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (12 vs. 8, P<0.001) and SAPS3 (71 vs. 69, P<0.001) values and were more likely to be associated with chemotherapy, steroid therapy, and immunocompromised status versus patients with solid tumors. The use of inotropes/ vasopressors, mechanical ventilation, and/or continuous renal replacement therapy was more frequently required in hematologic malignancy patients. Mortality rates in the ICU (41.7% vs. 24.6%, P<0.001) and hospital (53.1% vs. 38.6%, P=0.002) were higher in hematologic malignancy patients than in solid tumor patients.
Conclusions
Cancer patients accounted for one-third of all patients admitted to the studied ICUs in Korea. Clinical characteristics were different according to the type of malignancy. Patients with hematologic malignancies had a worse prognosis than did patients with solid tumor.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Failure in Patients With Cancer in the United States
    Kiyan Heybati, Jiawen Deng, Archis Bhandarkar, Fangwen Zhou, Cameron Zamanian, Namrata Arya, Mohamad Bydon, Philippe R. Bauer, Ognjen Gajic, Allan J. Walkey, Hemang Yadav
    Mayo Clinic Proceedings.2024; 99(4): 578.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and outcomes of cancer patients admitted to intensive care units in cancer specialized hospitals in China
    Wensheng Liu, Dongmin Zhou, Li Zhang, Mingguang Huang, Rongxi Quan, Rui Xia, Yong Ye, Guoxing Zhang, Zhuping Shen
    Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predictors of ICU mortality in patients with hemoblastosis and infectious complications
    A.V. Lyanguzov, A.S. Luchinin, S.V. Ignatyev, I.V. Paramonov
    Anesteziologiya i reanimatologiya.2023; (1): 33.     CrossRef
  • Effect of the underlying malignancy on critically ill septic patient's outcome
    Man‐Yee Man, Hoi‐Ping Shum, Sin‐Man Lam, Jacky Li, Wing‐Wa Yan, Mei‐Wan Yeung
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology.2022; 18(4): 473.     CrossRef
  • Impacts of Corticosteroid Therapy at Acute Stage of Hospital-Onset Clostridioides difficile Infections
    Ching-Chi Lee, Jen-Chieh Lee, Chun-Wei Chiu, Pei-Jane Tsai, Wen-Chien Ko, Yuan-Pin Hung
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2022; Volume 15: 5387.     CrossRef
  • Hospital mortality and prognostic factors in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury and cancer undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy
    Da Woon Kim, Geum Suk Jang, Kyoung Suk Jung, Hyuk Jae Jung, Hyo Jin Kim, Harin Rhee, Eun Young Seong, Sang Heon Song
    Kidney Research and Clinical Practice.2022; 41(6): 717.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Evaluating Geographical Variation in Outcomes of Cancer Patients Treated in ICUs
    Lama H. Nazer, Maria A. Lopez-Olivo, Anne Rain Brown, John A. Cuenca, Michael Sirimaturos, Khader Habash, Nada AlQadheeb, Heather May, Victoria Milano, Amy Taylor, Joseph L. Nates
    Critical Care Explorations.2022; 4(9): e0757.     CrossRef
  • Clinico-demographic and Outcome Predictors in Solid Tumor Patients with Unplanned Intensive Care Unit Admissions: An Observational Study
    Jigeeshu Divatia, Amit M Narkhede, Harish K Chaudhari, Ujwal Dhundi, Natesh Prabu Ravisankar, Satish Sarode
    Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2021; 25(12): 1421.     CrossRef
Guideline
Pulmonary
Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Young-Jae Cho, Jae Young Moon, Ein-Soon Shin, Je Hyeong Kim, Hoon Jung, So Young Park, Ho Cheol Kim, Yun Su Sim, Chin Kook Rhee, Jaemin Lim, Seok Jeong Lee, Won-Yeon Lee, Hyun Jeong Lee, Sang Hyun Kwak, Eun Kyeong Kang, Kyung Soo Chung, Won-Il Choi, The Korean Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Consensus Group
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(2):76-100.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.76
  • 16,740 View
  • 351 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between mechanical power and intensive care unit mortality in Korean patients under pressure-controlled ventilation
    Jae Kyeom Sim, Sang-Min Lee, Hyung Koo Kang, Kyung Chan Kim, Young Sam Kim, Yun Seong Kim, Won-Yeon Lee, Sunghoon Park, So Young Park, Ju-Hee Park, Yun Su Sim, Kwangha Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jin Hwa Lee, Heung Bum Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Ji Young Hong
    Acute and Critical Care.2024; 39(1): 91.     CrossRef
  • Predicting factors associated with prolonged intensive care unit stay of patients with COVID-19
    Won Ho Han, Jae Hoon Lee, June Young Chun, Young Ju Choi, Youseok Kim, Mira Han, Jee Hee Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(1): 41.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: invasive mechanical ventilation
    Young Sam Kim
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 151.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Jin-Young Kim, Sang-Bum Hong
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 157.     CrossRef
  • Prolonged glucocorticoid treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome – Authors' reply
    Rob Mac Sweeney, Daniel F McAuley
    The Lancet.2017; 389(10078): 1516.     CrossRef
  • Prolonged Glucocorticoid Treatment in ARDS: Impact on Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness
    Gianfranco Umberto Meduri, Andreas Schwingshackl, Greet Hermans
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Thoracic Surgery
Clinical Characteristics of the Development of Pneumothorax in Mechanically Ventilated Patients in Intensive Care Units
Wan Chul Kim, Su Jin Lim, Kyong Young Kim, Seung Jun Lee, Yu Ji Cho, Yi Yeong Jeong, Mi Jung Park, Kyoung Nyeo Jeon, Jong Deog Lee, Young Sil Hwang, Ho Cheol Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):13-18.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.13
  • 4,425 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Pneumothorax (PTX) can occur as a complication of positive pressure ventilation in mechanically ventilated patients.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed the clinical characteristics of patients who developed PTX during mechanical ventilation (MV) in the intensive care unit (ICU).
Results
Of the 326 patients admitted (208 men and 118 women; mean age, 65.3 ± 8.74 years), 15 (4.7%) developed PTX, which was MV-associated in 11 (3.3%) cases (6 men and 5 women; mean age, 68.3 ± 9.12 years) and procedure-associated in 4. Among the patients with MV-associated PTX, the underlying lung diseases were acute respiratory distress syndrome in 7 patients, interstitial lung disease in 2 patients, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2 patients. PTX diagnosis was achieved by chest radiography alone in 9 patients and chest computed tomography alone in 2 patients. Nine patients were using assist-control mode MV with the mean applied positive end-expiratory pressure, 9 ± 4.6 cmH2O and the mean tidal volume, 361 ± 63.7 ml at the diagnosis of PTX. Two patients died as a result of MV-associated PTX and their systolic pressure was below 80 mmHg and heart rates were less than 80/min. Ten patients were treated by chest tube insertion, and 1 patient was treated by percutaneous pigtail catheter insertion.
Conclusions
PTX can develop in patients undergoing MV, and may cause death. Early recognition and treatment are necessary to prevent hemodynamic compromise in patients who develop PTX.
Development of Acute Respiratory Failure on Initiation of Anti-Tuberculosis Medication in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Clinical and Radiologic Features of 8 Patients and Literature Review
Su Jin Lim, Donghoon Lew, Haa Na Song, You Eun Kim, Seung Jun Lee, Yu Ji Cho, Yi Yeong Jeong, Mi Jung Park, Kyoung Nyeo Jeon, Ho Cheol Kim, Jong Deog Lee, Young Sil Hwang
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2013;28(2):108-114.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2013.28.2.108
  • 2,549 View
  • 26 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Acute respiratory failure can occur paradoxically on initiation of anti-tuberculosis (TB) treatment in patients with pulmonary TB. This study is aimed to analyze the clinical features of anti-TB treatment induced acute respiratory failure.
METHODS
We reviewed the clinical and radiological characteristics of 8 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (5 men and 3 women; mean age, 55 +/- 15.5 years) who developed acute respiratory failure following initiation of anti-TB medication and thus required mechanical ventilation (MV) in the intensive care unit (ICU).
RESULTS
The interval between initiation of anti-TB medication and development of MV-requiring acute respiratory failure was 2-14 days (mean, 4.4 +/- 4.39 days), and the duration of MV was 1-18 days (mean, 7.1 +/- 7.03 days). At admission, body temperature and serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase and C-reactive protein were increased. Serum levels of protein, albumin and creatinine were 5.8 +/- 0.98, 2.3 +/- 0.5 and 1.8 +/- 2.58 mg/ml, respectively. Radiographs characterized both lung involvements in all patients. Consolidation with the associated nodule was noted in 7 patients, ground glass opacity in 2, and cavitary lesion in 4. Micronodular lesion in the lungs, suggesting miliary tuberculosis lesion, was noted in 1 patient. At ICU admissions, the ranges of the APACHE II and SOFA scores were 17-38 (mean, 28.2 +/- 7.26) and 6-14 (mean, 10.1 +/- 2.74). The mean lung injury score was 2.8 +/- 0.5. Overall, 6 patients died owing to septic shock and multiorgan failure.
CONCLUSIONS
On initiation of treatment for pulmonary TB, acute respiratory failure can paradoxically occur in patients with extensive lung parenchymal involvement and high mortality.
The Clinical Significance of Weight Change in Mechanical Ventilated, Critically Ill Patients of ICU
Young Sun Seo, You Eun Kim, Seung Jun Lee, Yu Ji Cho, Yi Yeong Jeong, Ho Cheol Kim, Jong Deok Lee, Young Sil Hwang
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2011;26(3):139-144.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2011.26.3.139
  • 2,374 View
  • 27 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Critically ill patients may show significant weight change in their course of disease during ICU stay. However, what weight changes occur and their effects on patient outcome have not yet been reported to our knowledge. Therefore, we evaluated weight change in critically ill patients in the medical ICU and the effect this may have on clinical outcome.
METHODS
We measured body weight in patients admitted to the medical ICU daily and evaluated their clinical characteristics and outcome.
RESULTS
Thirty-eight patients (M:F = 30:8, mean age = 65.7 +/- 12.5) were enrolled. Thirteen patients (34.2%) showed weight gain and the mean change was 12.8 +/- 4.2%. In contrast, 25 patients (65.8%) showed weight loss and the mean change was 6.3 +/- 6.9%. Patients who showed weight change over 5% or 10% were 26 (68.4%), and 12 (31.6%), respectively, and their mortality rates were 61.5% and 75%, respectively, showing no statistical significance (p > 0.05). However, when the degree of weight change was stratified with < 5%, 5-10% and > 10%, it was associated with death (p = 0.002). Factors like ICU stay, day of mechanical ventilation, initial APACHE II and SOFA score, body mass index (BMI) and serum albumin were not associated with more than 5% change of weight. BMI at admission was only associated with > 10% change of weight (p < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS
The majority of critically ill patients showed a significant weight change during their ICU stay and these patients may have a tendency to have worse clinical outcome.
Review
Mechanisms of Muscle Wasting in Patients with Sepsis
Gi Dong Lee, Ho Cheol Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2010;25(1):9-15.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2010.25.1.9
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  • 103 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Muscle wasting is commonly seen in patients with sepsis as a consequence of the catabolic response in skeletal muscle. Muscle wasting can occur in cases that have an imbalance between degradation and synthesis of muscle proteins. Although decrements in the synthesis of muscle proteins may contribute to sepsis-induced muscle wasting, it has been recognized that increments in its degradation play a more essential role in muscle wasting. Muscle wasting in sepsis patients has some significant clinical consequences such as reduced ambulation and exercise tolerance, and an increased risk for pulmonary and thromboembolic complications. Several mechanisms have been proposed for sepsis-induced muscle wasting. Increased proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the calpains system is one of the principal mechanisms of muscle wasting induced by sepsis. Calpains are activated by calcium, which increases in patients with sepsis. The activation of the calpains system disrupts the sarcomere of the myofibrils, resulting in the release of myofilaments that are subsequently ubiquitinated and degraded by the 26S proteasome complex. Recent studies have suggested that transcriptional factors such as NF-kappaB and FoxO, and the apoptosis and autophagy-lysosome pathways may also be involved in sepsis-induced muscle wasting. This review briefly summarizes the contribution of these mechanisms of muscle wasting in patients with sepsis and the possible therapeutic agents to treat it.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Role of IL-15 in Sepsis-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Proteolysis
    Ho Cheol Kim, Hee-Young Cho, Young-Sool Hah
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2012; 73(6): 312.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Change of Antibiotics Resistance Pattern of Microorganism Cultured in Tracheal Aspirate in Mechanical Ventilated Patients after Antibiotics Restriction Policy
Jeong Eun Ma, Soo Kyong Kim, Min Kyung Kang, Yi Yeong Jeong, Ho Cheol Kim, Jong Deok Lee, Young Sil Hwang
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2008;23(1):25-29.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2008.23.1.25
  • 2,887 View
  • 13 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
To reduce production of resistant bacteria by over-use of antibiotics, an antibiotics restriction policy became effective in several hospitals. However, there are different views on its effect. This study aims to examine antibiotic resistance of pathogenic organisms cultured in tracheal aspirates of the patients who need to maintain mechanical ventilation in medical intensive care unit before and after the antibiotics restriction policy.
METHODS
Before and after 2 years from August 2003, when carried out the antibiotics restriction policy in Gyeongsang university hospital, it was retrospectively investigated the antibiotic resistance pattern of bacteria cultured in tracheal aspirates of the patient who is maintained by mechanical ventilation more than 48 hours in the medical intensive care unit. Restricted antibiotics are ceftazidime, piperacillin/tazobactam, imipenem, meropenem, vancomycin, and teicoplanin.
RESULTS
Before the antibiotics restriction policy, (Sep 2001~Aug 2003) and after, (Sep 2003~Aug 2005), there were 306 and 565 patients applied in each case and the total use of antibiotics, except piperacillin/tazobactam, was reduced and that of cefotaxime and ceftriaxone was increased. There was no significant change in antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Enterobacter species.
CONCLUSION
The result of this study shows that the antibiotics restriction policy does not reduce production of antibiotic resistant bacteria in tracheal aspirate in a medical intensive care unit. However, it is considered that long-term observation may be necessary.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Clinical Characteristics in Patients with Carbapenem-ResistantAcinetobacter baumanniiIsolates from Tracheal Secretions
    Jeong Ha Mok, Mi Hyun Kim, Kwangha Lee, Ki Uk Kim, Hye-Kyung Park, Min Ki Lee
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2013; 28(3): 173.     CrossRef
  • Overview of Antibiotic Use in Korea
    Baek-Nam Kim
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2012; 44(4): 250.     CrossRef
Relationship between Change of RBC Shape and Multi-organ Failure in Sepsis
Ho Cheol Kim, Yoo Ji Cho, Hwi Jong Kim, Jong Deok Lee, Young Sil Hwang, Me Ae Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2005;20(1):63-67.
  • 1,635 View
  • 13 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Microcirculatory derangement in sepsis plays a crucial role in the impairment of tissue oxygenation that can lead to multi-organ failure and death. The change of RBC rheology in sepsis has been known to be important factors in microcirculatory derangement. Several studies have demonstrated that RBCs have decreased deformability in sepsis. We investigated the relationship between multi-organ failure and spherical index of RBC estimated by flow cytometer in critically ill patients with or without sepsis compared with the relationship in healthy volunteers.
METHODS
Fourteen non-septic critically ill patients, 18 septic patients and 10 healthy volunteers were evaluated. We obtained peripheral venous blood from each patient and analyzed the change of RBC shape using flow cytometer (Becton Dickinson FACSCalibur) within 90 minute. The change of RBC shape was accessed with spherical index (M2/M1). A decrease in M2/M1 was correlated with the sphericity of the RBC and considered to have a lower capacity to alter their shape when placed in microcirculation. Multi-organ failure was accessed with sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. RESULTS: The M2/M1 ratio of healthy volunteers, non-septic patients and septic patients were 2.25+/-0.08, 2.16+/-0.39 and 2.05+/-0.53, respectively. But, there was no significant difference between each group (p>0.05). And, there was no significant correlation between M2/M1 ratio of septic and non- septic patients and SOFA score (p>0.05, r2= -0.13). CONCLUSIONS: In our study, the spherical index of RBC was not associated with multi-organ failure in sepsis. But, further studies may be needed to evaluate the role of RBC rheology in sepsis.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care