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Volume 36 (1); February 2021
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Review Articles
Infection
Evolution of COVID-19 management in critical care: review and perspective from a hospital in the United Kingdom
Avinash Kumar Jha, Sudhindra Gurunath Kulkarni
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):1-14.   Published online February 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00864
  • 6,043 View
  • 373 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The unexpected emergence and spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been pandemic, with long-lasting effects, and unfortunately, it does not seem to have ended. Integrating advanced planning, strong teamwork, and clinical management have been both essential and rewarding during this time. Understanding the new concepts of this novel disease and accommodating them into clinical practice is an ongoing process, ultimately leading to advanced and highly specific treatment modalities. We conducted a literature review through PubMed, Europe PMC, Scopus, and Google Scholar to incorporate the most updated therapeutic principles. This article provides a concise and panoramic view of the cohort of critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We conclude that COVID-19 management includes low tidal volume ventilation, early proning, steroids, and a high suspicion for secondary bacterial/fungal infections. Lung ultrasound is emerging as a promising tool in assessing the clinical response. Managing non-clinical factors such as staff burnout, communication/consent issues, and socio-emotional well-being is equally important.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Implementation of an Emergency Department–Embedded Infusion Center for the Administration of Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Patients With Early COVID-19 Infection
    Julie Graham, Christina Ballejos, Danisha Jenkins, Christina Kelley
    Journal of Infusion Nursing.2022; 45(1): 41.     CrossRef
  • Editorial: cardiovascular anaesthesiology
    Anne D. Cherry, Mark Nelson, Nirvik Pal
    Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology.2022; 35(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Dietetic-Led Nutrition Interventions in Patients with COVID-19 during Intensive Care and Ward-Based Rehabilitation: A Single-Center Observational Study
    Ella Terblanche, Jessica Hills, Edie Russell, Rhiannon Lewis, Louise Rose
    Nutrients.2022; 14(5): 1062.     CrossRef
  • Mortality of COVID-19 Patients Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation During the Three Epidemic Waves
    Christophe Beyls, Pierre Huette, Christophe Viart, Benjamin Mestan, Guillaume Haye, Mathieu Guilbart, Michael Bernasinski, Patricia Besserve, Florent Leviel, Alejandro Witte Pfister, Florence De Dominicis, Vincent Jounieaux, Pascal Berna, Hervé Dupont, Os
    ASAIO Journal.2022; 68(12): 1434.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of characteristics and ventilatory course between coronavirus disease 2019 and Middle East respiratory syndrome patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome
    Imran Khalid, Romaysaa M Yamani, Maryam Imran, Muhammad Ali Akhtar, Manahil Imran, Rumaan Gul, Tabindeh Jabeen Khalid, Ghassan Y Wali
    Acute and Critical Care.2021; 36(3): 223.     CrossRef
Epidemiology
Influence of sarcopenia focused on critically ill patients
Belgin Akan
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):15-21.   Published online February 2, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00745
  • 4,466 View
  • 207 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
A systemic review was performed to evaluate the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of sarcopenia, the relationship of sarcopenia with critical illness and its impact on mortality, and diagnostic methods and treatment modalities. Generally, in the presence of critical illness, sarcopenia is not included in the treatment approach strategies. An intensivist should be aware that sarcopenia may be present in critically ill patients. Although the main modalities against sarcopenia are early mobilization and nutritional support, they can only prevent its development and may have positive effects on prognosis rather than treating the existing sarcopenia.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Low muscle mass in COVID-19 critically-ill patients: Prognostic significance and surrogate markers for assessment
    I.A. Osuna-Padilla, N.C. Rodríguez-Moguel, S. Rodríguez-Llamazares, C.E. Orsso, C.M. Prado, M.A. Ríos-Ayala, O. Villanueva-Camacho, A. Aguilar-Vargas, L.E. Pensado-Piedra, F. Juárez-Hernández, C.M. Hernández-Cárdenas
    Clinical Nutrition.2022; 41(12): 2910.     CrossRef
  • A systematic review of the definitions and prevalence of feeding intolerance in critically ill adults
    Bethan Jenkins, Philip C. Calder, Luise V. Marino
    Clinical Nutrition ESPEN.2022; 49: 92.     CrossRef
  • The Diagnostic Value of Ultrasound of the Rectus Femoris for the diagnosis of Sarcopenia in adults: A systematic review
    I. Nies, L.L.G.C. Ackermans, M. Poeze, T.J. Blokhuis, Jan A. Ten Bosch
    Injury.2022; 53: S23.     CrossRef
  • Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump Placement in the Axillary Artery: Where are We?
    Gustavo André Boeing Boros, Claudia Yanet San Martin de Bernoche, Pedro Felipe Gomes Nicz
    ABC: Heart Failure & Cardiomyopathy.2022; 2(2): 209.     CrossRef
  • Current practice and barriers in the implementation of ultrasound-based assessment of muscle mass in Japan: A nationwide, web-based cross-sectional study
    Keishi Nawata, Nobuto Nakanishi, Shigeaki Inoue, Keibun Liu, Masafumi Nozoe, Yuko Ono, Isamu Yamada, Hajime Katsukawa, Joji Kotani, Supat Chupradit
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(11): e0276855.     CrossRef
  • A scoping review considering potential biomarkers or functional measures of gastrointestinal dysfunction and enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill adults
    Bethan Jenkins, Philip C. Calder, Luise V. Marino
    Clinical Nutrition ESPEN.2022; 52: 331.     CrossRef
  • ICU Acquired Weakness in patients with respiratory failure
    Sergei A. Andreichenko, Mikhail V. Bychinin, Dmitriy I. Korshunov, Tatiana V. Klypa
    Journal of Clinical Practice.2021; 12(2): 5.     CrossRef
  • Predicting outcome in abdominal sepsis: putting the puzzle together
    Catherine S. Reid, Vanessa M. Banz, Joerg C. Schefold, Markus M. Luedi
    Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle.2021; 12(5): 1119.     CrossRef
  • Ultrasound assessment of muscle mass has potential to identify patients with low muscularity at intensive care unit admission: A retrospective study
    Yuta Arai, Nobuto Nakanishi, Yuko Ono, Shigeaki Inoue, Joji Kotani, Masafumi Harada, Jun Oto
    Clinical Nutrition ESPEN.2021; 45: 177.     CrossRef
CPR/Resuscitation
Critical emergency medicine and the resuscitative care unit
Maria Mermiri, Georgios Mavrovounis, Dimitrios Chatzis, Ioannis Mpoutsikos, Aristea Tsaroucha, Maria Dova, Zacharoula Angelopoulou, Dimitrios Ragias, Athanasios Chalkias, Ioannis Pantazopoulos
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):22-28.   Published online January 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00521
  • 4,231 View
  • 203 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Critical emergency medicine is the medical field concerned with management of critically ill patients in the emergency department (ED). Increased ED stay due to intensive care unit (ICU) overcrowding has a negative impact on patient care and outcome. It has been proposed that implementation of critical care services in the ED can negate this effect. Two main Critical Emergency Medicine models have been proposed, the “resource intensivist” and “ED-ICU” models. The resource intensivist model is based on constant presence of an intensivist in the traditional ED setting, while the ED-ICU model encompasses the notion of a separate ED-based unit, with monitoring and therapeutic capabilities similar to those of an ICU. Critical emergency medicine has the potential to improve patient care and outcome; however, establishment of evidence-based protocols and a multidisciplinary approach in patient management are of major importance.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Value of Intensive Nursing Detail Management in Intensive Care Unit Nursing
    Yansong Li, Lehong Zhou, Qin Wei, Zhaoqi Dong
    Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Early Low-Calorie Enteral Nutrition Support in Critically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Qidong Jiang, Tao Xu, Dinesh Rokaya
    BioMed Research International.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Is the Critical Care Resuscitation Unit Sustainable: A 5-Year Experience of a Beneficial and Novel Model
    Elizabeth Powell, Iana Sahadzic, Daniel Najafali, Emilie Berman, Katie Andersen, Leenah Z. Afridi, Zoe Gasparotti, Erin Niles, Jeffrey Rea, Thomas Scalea, Daniel J. Haase, Quincy K. Tran, Edward A. Bittner
    Critical Care Research and Practice.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Basic science and research
Feasibility study of incident dark-field video microscope for measuring microcirculatory variables in the mouse dorsal skinfold chamber model
Christine Kang, Ah-Reum Cho, Hyeon Jeong Lee, Hyae Jin Kim, Eun-Jung Kim, Soeun Jeo, Jeong-Min Hong, Daehoan Moon
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):29-36.   Published online February 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00969
  • 3,498 View
  • 105 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Despite the importance of microcirculation in organ function, monitoring microcirculation is not a routine practice. With developments in microscopic technology, incident dark field (IDF) microscopy (Cytocam) has allowed visualization of the microcirculation. Dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) mouse model has been used to investigate microcirculation physiology. By employing Cytocam-IDF imaging with DSC model to assess microcirculatory alteration in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia, we attempted to validate availability of Cytocam-IDF imaging of microcirculation.
Methods
DSC was implanted in eight BALB/c mice for each group; control and sepsis. Both groups were given 72 hours to recover from surgery. The sepsis group had an additional 24-hour period of recovery post-LPS injection (4 mg/kg). Subsequently, a video of the microcirculation was recorded using Cytocam. Data on microcirculatory variables were obtained. Electron microscopy was implemented using lanthanum fixation to detect endothelial glycocalyx degradation.
Results
The microcirculatory flow index was significantly lower (control, 2.8±0.3; sepsis, 2.1±0.8; P=0.033) and heterogeneity index was considerably higher (control, 0.10±0.15; sepsis, 0.53±0.48; P=0.044) in the sepsis group than in the control group. Electron microscopy revealed glycocalyx demolishment in the sepsis group.
Conclusions
Cytocam showed reliable ability for observing changes in the microcirculation under septic conditions in the DSC model. The convenience and good imaging quality and the automatic analysis software available for Cytocam-IDF imaging, along with the ability to perform real-time in vivo experiments in the DSC model, are expected to be helpful in future microcirculation investigations.
CPR/Resuscitation
Is two-dimensional echocardiography better than electrocardiography for predicting patient outcomes after cardiac arrest?
Dong Ki Kim, Yong Soo Cho, Joochan Kim, Byung Kook Lee, Dong Hun Lee, Eujene Jung, Jeong Mi Moon, Byeong Jo Chun
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):37-45.   Published online December 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00773
  • 3,258 View
  • 134 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Coronary artery stenosis increases hospital mortality and leads to poor neurological recovery in cardiac arrest (CA) patients. However, electrocardiography (ECG) cannot fully predict the presence of coronary artery stenosis in CA patients. Hence, we aimed to determine whether regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA), as observed by two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE), predicted patient survival outcomes with greater accuracy than did ST segment elevation (STE) on ECG in CA patients who underwent coronary angiography (CAG) after return of spontaneous circulation.
Methods
This was a retrospective observational study of adult patients with CA of presumed cardiac etiology who underwent CAG at a single tertiary care hospital. We investigated whether RWMA observed on 2DE predicted patient outcomes more accurately than did STE observed on ECG. The primary outcome was incidence of hospital mortality. The secondary outcomes were Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Category scores measured 6 months after discharge and significant coronary artery stenosis on CAG.
Results
Among the 145 patients, 36 (24.8%) experienced in-hospital death. In multivariable analysis of survival outcomes, only total arrest time (P=0.011) and STE (P=0.035) were significant. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI), which were obtained by adjusting the total arrest time for survival outcomes, were significant only for STE (OR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.17–0.94). The presence of RWMA was not a significant factor.
Conclusions
While STE predicted survival outcomes in adult CA patients, RWMA did not. The decision to perform CAG after CA should include ECG under existing guidelines. The use of RWMA has limited benefits in treatment of this population.
Pulmonary
Development of a prognostic scoring system in patients with pneumonia requiring ventilator care for more than 4 days: a single-center observational study
Yeseul Oh, Yewon Kang, Kwangha Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):46-53.   Published online February 17, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00787
  • 4,092 View
  • 93 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The aim of the present study was to develop a prognostic model using demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and clinical variables measured on day 4 of mechanical ventilation (MV) for patients with prolonged acute mechanical ventilation (PAMV; MV for >96 hours).
Methods
Data from 437 patients (70.9% male; median age, 68 years) were obtained over a period of 9 years. All patients were diagnosed with pneumonia. Binary logistic regression identified factors predicting mortality at 90 days after the start of MV. A PAMV prognosis score was calculating ß-coefficient values and assigning points to variables.
Results
The overall 90-day mortality rate was 47.1%. Five factors (age ≥65 years, body mass index <18.5 kg/m2, hemato-oncologic diseases as comorbidities, requirement for vasopressors on day 4 of MV and requirement for neuromuscular blocking agents on day 4 of MV) were identified as prognostic indicators. Each factor was valued as +1 point, and used to develop a PAMV prognosis score. This score showed acceptable discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.695 for mortality, 95% confidence interval 0.650–0.738, p<0.001), and calibration (Hosmer–Lemeshow chi-square=6.331, with df 7 and p=0.502). The cutoff value for predicting mortality based on the maximum Youden index was ≤2 (sensitivity, 87.5%; specificity, 41.3%). For patients with PAMV scores ≤1, 2, 3 and ≥4, the 90-day mortality rates were 29.2%, 45.7%, 67.9%, and 90.9%, respectively (P<0.001).
Conclusions
Our study developed a PAMV prognosis score for predicting 90-day mortality. Further research is needed to validate the utility of this score.
Pulmonary
Effectiveness of online versus in-person structured training program on arterial blood gas, electrolytes, and ventilatory management of critically ill patients
Gaurav Jain, Bhavna Gupta, Priyanka Gupta, Sagarika Panda, Sameer Sharma, Shalinee Rao
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):54-61.   Published online February 2, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00759
  • 3,106 View
  • 94 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Due to the risk of viral transmission during in-person training, a shift toward online platforms is imperative in the current pandemic. Therefore, we compared the effectiveness of an in-person interactive course with a structurally similar online course designed to improve cognitive skills among clinical health professionals in arterial blood gas analysis, management of electrolyte imbalances, and approaches to mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients.
Methods
In an observational, outcome assessor-blinded, cohort trial, group A included participants enrolled prospectively in an online course, while group B included those who took part in an in-person course (retrospective arm). The primary objective was comparison of cognitive skills through a pre and post-test questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t-test.
Results
In total, 435 participants were analyzed in group A, while 99 participants were evaluated in group B. The mean pre-test score was 9.48±2.75 and 10.76±2.42, while the mean post-test score was 11.94±1.90 (passing rate, 64.6%) and 12.53±1.63 (passing rate, 73.3%) in groups A and B, respectively. Group B scored significantly higher in both pre-test (P=0.001) and post-test evaluations (P=0.004). The improvement in post-test score was significantly greater (P=0.001) in group A (2.46±2.22) compared to group B (1.77±1.76). The medical specialties fared better in group B, while surgical specialties scored higher in group A. The pre-test vs. post-test scores exhibited a moderate correlation in both groups (P<0.001). The feedback survey showed a Likert score >3.5 for most points in both groups.
Conclusions
The online teaching module exhibited a significant benefit in terms of participant sensitization and knowledge sharing.
Pediatric
Abstract to publication conversion in pediatric critical care medicine in Pakistan
Anwarul Haque, Mohammad Shahzad, Humaira Jurair, Naveed Ur Rehman Siddiqui, Sidra Ishaque, Qalab Abbas
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):62-66.   Published online February 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00780
  • 3,135 View
  • 71 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
To determine the rate of conversion of abstracts presented at conferences into full-text articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the field of pediatric critical care medicine (PCCM) in a developing country.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed PCCM abstracts from Pakistan presented at national and international pediatric and critical care conferences over 10 years (January 2010 to March 2020). Data included abstract characteristics, such as presentation (poster/oral), presenter (fellow/resident), time of meeting (month and year), type of meeting, study design and topic; and publication characteristics, such as journal name, time (month and year) and first author. The primary outcome was publication rate of PCCM abstracts presented in meetings and time (months) from presentation to publication.
Results
A total of 79 PCCM abstracts were presented in 20 meetings during the study period. There were 65 poster presentations (82.28%), of which 63 (79.74%) were presented at international critical care conferences and all presenters were PCCM fellows. In total, 64 (81%) abstracts were descriptive observational studies (retrospective: 50, 63.29%) and prospective (14, 17.72%). Only one was an interventional randomized controlled trial. The publication rate of PCCM abstracts was 63.3% (50/79) and the mean time to publication was 12.39±13.61 months. The publication rate was significantly correlated to the year of publication (P<0.001).
Conclusions
The PCCM abstract publication rate and mean time from presentation to publication was 63.3% and 12.39±13.61 months, respectively, in a developing country.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • From Concept to Publication
    Aaron W. Calhoun, Isabel T. Gross, Leah B. Mallory, Lindsay N. Shepard, Mark D. Adler, Tensing Maa, Marc A. Auerbach, Adam Cheng, David O. Kessler, Travis M. Whitfill, Jonathan P. Duff
    Simulation in Healthcare: The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare.2022; 17(6): 385.     CrossRef
Case Reports
CPR/Resuscitation
Successful resuscitation of refractory ventricular fibrillation with double sequence defibrillation
SungJoon Park, Jung-Youn Kim, Young-Duck Cho, Eusun Lee, Bosun Shim, Young-Hoon Yoon
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):67-69.   Published online October 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00122
  • 3,308 View
  • 94 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
In cardiac arrest, if the initial rhythm is ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, the survival rates are high and good neurologic outcomes are expected. However, the mortality rate increases when refractory ventricular fibrillation (RVF) occurs. We report a case of RVF that was successfully resuscitated with double sequence defibrillation (DSD). A 51-year-old man visited the emergency department with chest pain. The initial electrocardiography showed markedly elevated ST-segment on V1–V5 leads, and VF arrest occurred. Although 10 defibrillations were administered over 20 minutes, there was no response. Two rounds of DSD were performed by placing additional pads on the patient’s anterior-posterior areas and sequentially applying the maximum energy setting. The patient returned to spontaneous circulation and was discharged with cerebral performance category 1 after 14 days of hospital admission. Therefore, DSD could be an option for treatment and termination of RVF.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Keep shocking: Double sequential defibrillation for refractory ventricular fibrillation
    Ahmed Kamal Mohamed, Mohamed Shakaib Nayaz, Ali Nawaz, Carl B Kapadia
    The American Journal of Emergency Medicine.2023; 63: 178.e5.     CrossRef
Cardiology
A successfully treated case of primary purulent pericarditis complicated by cardiac tamponade and pneumopericardium
Jong Wook Beom, Yeekyoung Ko, Ki Yung Boo, Jae-Geun Lee, Joon Hyouk Choi, Seung-Jae Joo, Ji Hwan Moon, Su Wan Kim, Song-Yi Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):70-74.   Published online October 12, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00234
  • 8,474 View
  • 148 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Acute pericarditis is caused by various factors, but purulent pericarditis is rare. Primary purulent pericarditis in immunocompetent hosts is very rare in the modern antibiotics era. We report a successfully treated case of primary purulent pericarditis complicated with cardiac tamponade and pneumopericardium in an immunocompetent host. A 69-year-old female was referred from another hospital because of pleuritic chest pain with a large amount of pericardial effusion. She was diagnosed with acute pericarditis accompanied by cardiac tamponade. We performed emergency pericardiocentesis, with drainage of 360 ml of bloody pericardial fluid. The culture grew Streptococcus anginosus, confirming the diagnosis of acute purulent pericarditis. We performed pericardiostomy because cardiomegaly and pneumopericardium were aggravated after removal of the pericardial drainage catheter. The patient received antibiotics for a total of 23 days intravenously and was discharged with oral antibiotic therapy. Purulent pericarditis is one of the rare forms of pericarditis and is lifethreatening. A multimodality approach is required for proper diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Rare Case of Primary Purulent Pericarditis Caused by Streptococcus constellatus
    Medeinė Kapačinskaitė, Dovilė Gabartaitė, Agnė Šatrauskienė, Ieva Sakaitė, Vytė Valerija Maneikienė, Aleksejus Zorinas, Vilius Janušauskas
    Medicina.2023; 59(1): 159.     CrossRef
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    Magdalena Pilarczyk-Zurek, Izabela Sitkiewicz, Joanna Koziel
    Frontiers in Microbiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effects of pneumopericardium during epicardial catheter ablation after dry pericardiocentesis on patients with ventricular arrhythmia
    Qingyong Chen, Bosen Yang, Zhenggang Lai, Wen Yue, Qing Yang
    Journal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Image in Critical Care
Pulmonary
Pneumothorax and pulmonary air leaks as ventilator-induced injuries in COVID-19
Gabriele Martelli, Ivo Tiberio
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):75-77.   Published online January 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00955
  • 6,171 View
  • 189 Download
PDF
Letters to the editor
Pulmonary
Retrieval of a tracheobronchial blood clot with a Yankauer suction catheter in complete airway obstruction
Sharad Kaushik, Gaurav Jain, Namrata Gupta, Lokesh Kumar Saini, Girish Sindhwani
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):78-80.   Published online January 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00675
  • 2,629 View
  • 76 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Pulmonary
Pneumothorax rate in intubated patients with COVID-19
Kathleen M. Capaccione, Belinda D’souza, Jay Leb, Lyndon Luk, Jimmy Duong, Wei-Yann Tsai, Ben Navot, Shifali Dumeer, Ahmed Mohammed, Mary M. Salvatore
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):81-84.   Published online December 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00689
  • 4,642 View
  • 156 Download
  • 12 Citations
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Incidence and Outcome of Pneumomediastinum in Non-ICU Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients*
    Moises Muley, Panaiotis Finamore, Claudio Pedone, Domenico Paolo Emanuele Margiotta, Emanuele Gilardi, Federica Sambuco, Antonio De Vincentis, Umberto Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Francesco Travaglino, Raffaele Antonelli-Incalzi
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  • COVID-19 Critical Illness: A Data-Driven Review
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    Annual Review of Medicine.2022; 73(1): 95.     CrossRef
  • Macklin effect on baseline chest CT scan accurately predicts barotrauma in COVID-19 patients
    Gianluca Paternoster, Gianfranco Belmonte, Enrico Scarano, Pietro Rotondo, Diego Palumbo, Alessandro Belletti, Francesco Corradi, Pietro Bertini, Giovanni Landoni, Fabio Guarracino, Alessandro Isirdi, Diego Costanzo, Matteo Romani, Luigi De Simone, Robert
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    Roopak Dubey, Kamal Kumar Sen, Aparajita Mishra
    Bulletin of the National Research Centre.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 on Chest CT: Translating Known Microscopic Findings to Imaging Observations
    Belinda Dsouza, Kathleen M. Capaccione, Aron Soleiman, Jay Leb, Mary Salvatore
    Life.2022; 12(6): 855.     CrossRef
  • Incidence, clinical characteristics and outcome of barotrauma in critically ill patients with COVID-19: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Michele UMBRELLO, Roberto VENCO, Edoardo ANTONUCCI, Sergio CEREGHINI, Clelia FILARDO, Luigi GUGLIELMETTI, Giulia MONTANARI, Stefano MUTTINI
    Minerva Anestesiologica.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pneumothorax in Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients: Prevalence, Analysis of Risk Factors and Clinical Outcomes
    Zeead AlGhamdi, Shaya Y Alqahtani, Khalid AlDajani, Ammar Alsaedi, Omar Al-Rubaish, Abdulmajeed Alharbi, Hatem Elbawab
    International Journal of General Medicine.2022; Volume 15: 8249.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of Pneumothorax/Pneumomediastinum in Mechanically Ventilated COVID-19 Patients
    Alessandro Belletti, Diego Palumbo, Alberto Zangrillo, Evgeny V. Fominskiy, Stefano Franchini, Antonio Dell'Acqua, Alessandro Marinosci, Giacomo Monti, Giordano Vitali, Sergio Colombo, Giorgia Guazzarotti, Rosalba Lembo, Nicolò Maimeri, Carolina Faustini,
    Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia.2021; 35(12): 3642.     CrossRef
  • Pulmonary Barotrauma in COVID-19 Patients: Invasive versus Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation
    Shadi Hamouri, Shaher M Samrah, Omar Albawaih, Zidan Saleh, Mahmoud M Smadi, Ahmad Alhazymeh, Sebawe Syaj
    International Journal of General Medicine.2021; Volume 14: 2017.     CrossRef
  • Pulmonary Barotrauma in COVID-19 Patients With ARDS on Invasive and Non-Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation
    Kartikeya Rajdev, Alan J. Spanel, Sean McMillan, Shubham Lahan, Brian Boer, Justin Birge, Meilinh Thi
    Journal of Intensive Care Medicine.2021; 36(9): 1013.     CrossRef
  • Pneumothorax and barotrauma in invasively ventilated patients with COVID-19
    Alessandro Belletti, Giovanni Landoni, Alberto Zangrillo
    Respiratory Medicine.2021; 187: 106552.     CrossRef
  • Outcomes of Barotrauma in Critically Ill COVID-19 Patients With Severe Pneumonia
    Victor P. Gazivoda, Mudathir Ibrahim, Aaron Kangas-Dick, Arony Sun, Michael Silver, Ory Wiesel
    Journal of Intensive Care Medicine.2021; 36(10): 1176.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care