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Emily L. G. Heaphy 1 Article
CPR/Resuscitation
Percent fluid overload for prediction of fluid de-escalation in critically ill patients in Saudi Arabia: a prospective observational study
Reham A. Alharbi, Namareq F. Aldardeer, Emily L. G. Heaphy, Ahmad H. Alabbasi, Amjad M. Albuqami, Hassan Hawa
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):209-216.   Published online May 16, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01550
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Background
Percent fluid overload greater than 5% is associated with increased mortality. The appropriate time for fluid deresuscitation depends on the patient's radiological and clinical findings. This study aimed to assess the applicability of percent fluid overload calculations for evaluating the need for fluid deresuscitation in critically ill patients. Methods: This was a single-center, prospective, observational study of critically ill adult patients requiring intravenous fluid administration. The study's primary outcome was median percent fluid accumulation on the day of fluid deresuscitation or intensive care unit (ICU) discharge, whichever came first. Results: A total of 388 patients was screened between August 1, 2021, and April 30, 2022. Of these, 100 with a mean age of 59.8±16.2 years were included for analysis. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was 15.4±8.0. Sixty-one patients (61.0%) required fluid deresuscitation during their ICU stay, while 39 (39.0%) did not. Median percent fluid accumulation on the day of deresuscitation or ICU discharge was 4.5% (interquartile range [IQR], 1.7%–9.1%) and 5.2% (IQR, 2.9%–7.7%) in patients requiring deresuscitation and those who did not, respectively. Hospital mortality occurred in 25 (40.9%) of patients with deresuscitation and six (15.3%) patients who did not require it (P=0.007). Conclusions: The percent fluid accumulation on the day of fluid deresuscitation or ICU discharge was not statistically different between patients who required fluid deresuscitation and those who did not. A larger sample size is needed to confirm these findings.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care