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Sang Il Lee 3 Articles
Pulmonary
Lobar Bronchial Rupture with Persistent Atelectasis after Blunt Trauma
Jun Hyun Kim, Kyung Woo Kim, Chu Sung Cho, Sang Il Lee, Ji Yeon Kim, Kyung Tae Kim, Won Joo Choe, Jang Su Park, Jung Won Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(4):344-347.   Published online November 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.4.344
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Rupture limited to the lobar bronchus from blunt trauma is especially rare, and the symptoms are light so diagnosis is difficult. In a patient who visited the hospital complaining of shortness of breath after falling down, atelectasis continued in the chest x-ray. Four days after visiting the hospital, a left upper lobar bronchial rupture was diagnosed through a bronchoscopy and 3 dimensional chest computerized tomography. When diagnosis is delayed in the case of a rupture limited to the lobar bronchus, bronchial obstruction can occur from the formation of granulation tissue, so regular monitoring is important. Therefore, when atelectasis continues after blunt trauma, it is important to differentially diagnose a lobar bronchial rupture through tests such as bronchoscopy.
Vascular Surgery
Guide Wire Entrapment during Central Venous Catheterization
Kyung Woo Kim, Jun Hyun Kim, Se Hyeok Park, Ji Yeon Kim, Sang Il Lee, Kyung Tae Kim, Jang Su Park, Jung Won Kim, Won Joo Choe
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(2):137-140.   Published online May 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.2.137
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AbstractAbstract PDF
We experienced a case of venous vessel wall entrapment between the introducer needle and the guide wire during an attempt to perform right internal jugular vein (IJV) catheterization. The guide wire was introduced with no resistance but could not be withdrawn. We performed ultrasonography and C-arm fluoroscopy to confirm the entrapment location. We assumed the introducer needle penetrated the posterior vessel wall during the puncture and that only the guide wire entered the vein; an attempt to retract the wire pinched the vein wall between the needle tip and the guide wire. Careful examination with various diagnostic tools to determine the exact cause of entrapment is crucial for reducing catastrophic complications and achieving better outcomes during catheterization procedures.
Blunt Splenic Injury by Gunshot
Young Hoon Sul, Sang Il Lee, Kwang Sik Cheon, Jae Young Moon, Jun Wan Lee, In Sang Song
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2013;28(4):340-343.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2013.28.4.340
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Trauma is frequently not purely penetrating or purely blunt. Such mixed trauma can result from the mechanism of injury. Recently, we encountered a patient who accidentally shot himself with a shotgun. He had a 15 x 8-cm-sized penetrating injury on left flank that did not penetrate into the peritoneal cavity and a blunt splenic injury with hemoperitoneum. Surgical and interventional treatments were performed for each injury. We present this case with a review of the related literature.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care