Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

ACC : Acute and Critical Care

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Articles

Page Path
HOME > Acute Crit Care > Volume 28(2); 2013 > Article
Original Article Low Blood Selenium Concentrations in Critically Ill Children with Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome and Respiratory Dysfunction
Young A Kim, Eun Ju Ha, Won Kyoung Jhang, Seong Jong Park

DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2013.28.2.86
Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Asan Medical Center Children's Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. drpsj@amc.seoul.kr
  • 2,539 Views
  • 20 Download
  • 0 Crossref
  • 0 Scopus

BACKGROUND
Selenium is an essential trace-element with antioxidant and immunological function. We studied the relationship between blood selenium concentrations, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and organ dysfunctions in critically ill children.
METHODS
This was a retrospective, observational study of the blood selenium concentrations of critically ill children at the time of a pediatric intensive care unit admission.
RESULTS
A total of 62 patients with a median age of 18 (5-180) months were included in this study. The mean of blood selenium concentration (microg/dl) was 8.49 +/- 2.42. The platelet count (r = -0.378) and PaCO2 (r = -0.403) showed negative correlations with blood selenium concentration, while PaO2/FiO2 (r = 0.359) and PaO2 (r = 0.355) showed positive correlations (p < 0.05, for all variables). Blood selenium concentrations were significantly lower in patients with SIRS than in those patients without SIRS (8.08 +/- 2.42 vs. 9.45 +/- 2.02, p = 0.011). Patients with severe sepsis and septic shock had showed significantly lower blood selenium concentrations than those without SIRS (7.03 +/- 2.73 vs. 9.45 +/- 2.02, p = 0.042). Patients with PaO2/FiO2 < or = 300 had lower blood selenium concentrations than those with PaO2/FiO2 > 300 (7.90 +/- 2.43 vs. 9.54 +/- 2.17, p = 0.018). Blood selenium concentrations were significantly lower in patient with PaO2/FiO2 < or = 200 than in those with PaO2/FiO2 > 300 (7.64 +/- 2.76 vs. 9.54 +/- 2.17, p = 0.018).
CONCLUSIONS
Patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome or respiratory dysfunction showed significantly low blood selenium concentrations.


ACC : Acute and Critical Care