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8 "ultrasound"
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Original Article
Trauma
The correlation between carotid artery Doppler and stroke volume during central blood volume loss and resuscitation
Isabel Kerrebijn, Sarah Atwi, Mai Elfarnawany, Andrew M. Eibl, Joseph K. Eibl, Jenna L. Taylor, Chul Ho Kim, Bruce D. Johnson, Jon-Émile S. Kenny
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):162-168.   Published online February 23, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01095
  • 744 View
  • 86 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Using peripheral arteries to infer central hemodynamics is common among hemodynamic monitors. Doppler ultrasound of the common carotid artery has been used in this manner with conflicting results. We investigated the relationship between changing common carotid artery Doppler measures and stroke volume (SV), hypothesizing that more consecutively-averaged cardiac cycles would improve SV-carotid Doppler correlation. Methods: Twenty-seven healthy volunteers were recruited and studied in a physiology laboratory. Carotid artery Doppler pulse was measured with a wearable, wireless ultrasound during central hypovolemia and resuscitation induced by a stepped lower body negative pressure protocol. The change in maximum velocity time integral (VTI) and corrected flow time of the carotid artery (ccFT) were compared with changing SV using repeated measures correlation. Results: In total, 73,431 cardiac cycles were compared across 27 subjects. There was a strong linear correlation between changing SV and carotid Doppler measures during simulated hemorrhage (repeated-measures linear correlation [Rrm ]=0.91 for VTI; 0.88 for ccFT). This relationship improved with larger numbers of consecutively-averaged cardiac cycles. For ccFT, beyond four consecutively-averaged cardiac cycles the correlation coefficient remained strong (i.e., Rrm of at least 0.80). For VTI, the correlation coefficient with SV was strong for any number of averaged cardiac cycles. For both ccFT and VTI, Rrm remained stable around 25 consecutively-averaged cardiac cycles. Conclusions: There was a strong linear correlation between changing SV and carotid Doppler measures during central blood volume loss. The strength of this relationship was dependent upon the number of consecutively-averaged cardiac cycles.
Review Articles
Surgery
Early detection and assessment of intensive care unit-acquired weakness: a comprehensive review
Hanan Elkalawy, Pavan Sekhar, Wael Abosena
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(4):409-424.   Published online November 30, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00703
  • 2,322 View
  • 235 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW) is a serious complication in critically ill patients. Therefore, timely and accurate diagnosis and monitoring of ICU-AW are crucial for effectively preventing its associated morbidity and mortality. This article provides a comprehensive review of ICU-AW, focusing on the different methods used for its diagnosis and monitoring. Additionally, it highlights the role of bedside ultrasound in muscle assessment and early detection of ICU-AW. Furthermore, the article explores potential strategies for preventing ICU-AW. Healthcare providers who manage critically ill patients utilize diagnostic approaches such as physical exams, imaging, and assessment tools to identify ICU-AW. However, each method has its own limitations. The diagnosis of ICU-AW needs improvement due to the lack of a consensus on the appropriate approach for its detection. Nevertheless, bedside ultrasound has proven to be the most reliable and cost-effective tool for muscle assessment in the ICU. Combining the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score assessment, and ultrasound can be a convenient approach for the early detection of ICU-AW. This approach can facilitate timely intervention and prevent catastrophic consequences. However, further studies are needed to strengthen the evidence.
Pulmonary
Lung ultrasound for evaluation of dyspnea: a pictorial review
Aparna Murali, Anjali Prakash, Rashmi Dixit, Monica Juneja, Naresh Kumar
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):502-515.   Published online November 21, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00780
  • 6,968 View
  • 646 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Lung ultrasound is based on the analysis of ultrasound artifacts generated by the pleura and air within the lungs. In recent years, lung ultrasound has emerged as an important alternative for quick evaluation of the patient at the bedside. Several techniques and protocols for performing lung ultrasound have been described in the literature, with the most popular one being the Bedside Lung Ultrasound in Emergency (BLUE) protocol which can be utilized to diagnose the cause of acute dyspnea at the bedside. We attempt to provide a simplified approach to understanding the physics behind the artifacts used in lung ultrasound, the imaging techniques, and the application of the BLUE protocol to diagnose the commonly presenting causes of acute dyspnea.
Original Article
Pulmonary
The role of diaphragmatic thickness measurement in weaning prediction and its comparison with rapid shallow breathing index: a single-center experience
Lokesh Kumar Lalwani, Manjunath B Govindagoudar, Pawan Kumar Singh, Mukesh Sharma, Dhruva Chaudhry
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):347-354.   Published online July 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00108
  • 3,511 View
  • 222 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is commonly managed with invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). The majority of the time that a patient spends on IMV is in the process of weaning. Prediction of the weaning outcome is of paramount importance, as untimely/delayed extubation is associated with a high risk of mortality. Diaphragmatic ultrasonography is a promising tool in the intensive care unit, and its utility in predicting the success of weaning remains understudied.
Methods
In this prospective-observational study, we recruited 54 ARF patients on IMV, along with 50 healthy controls. During a spontaneous breathing trial, all subjects underwent diaphragmatic ultrasonography along with a rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) assessment.
Results
The mean age was 41.8±17.0 and 37.6±10.5 years among the cases and control group, respectively. Demographic variables were broadly similar in the two groups. The most common cause of ARF was obstructive airway disease. The average duration of IMV was 5.41±2.81 days. Out of 54 subjects, 45 were successfully weaned, while nine patients failed weaning. Age, body mass index, and severity of disease were similar in the successful and failed weaning patients. The sensitivity in predicting successful weaning of percent change in diaphragmatic thickness (Δtdi%) >29.71% was high (93.33%), while specificity was 66.67%. The sensitivity and specificity of mean diaphragmatic thickness (tdi) end-expiratory >0.178 cm was 60.00% and 77.78%, respectively. RSBI at 1 minute of <93.75 had an equally high sensitivity (93.33%) but a lower specificity (22.22%). Similar results were also found for RSBI measured at 5 minutes.
Conclusions
During the weaning assessment, the purpose is to minimize both premature as well as delayed extubation. We found that diaphragmatic ultrasonography, in particular Δtdi%, is better than RSBI in predicting weaning outcomes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Ultrasonography to Access Diaphragm Dysfunction and Predict the Success of Mechanical Ventilation Weaning in Critical Care
    Marta Rafael Marques, José Manuel Pereira, José Artur Paiva, Gonzalo García de Casasola‐Sánchez, Yale Tung‐Chen
    Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine.2024; 43(2): 223.     CrossRef
  • Accuracy of respiratory muscle assessments to predict weaning outcomes: a systematic review and comparative meta-analysis
    Diego Poddighe, Marine Van Hollebeke, Yasir Qaiser Choudhary, Débora Ribeiro Campos, Michele R. Schaeffer, Jan Y. Verbakel, Greet Hermans, Rik Gosselink, Daniel Langer
    Critical Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Ultrasonographic evaluation of diaphragm thickness and excursion: correlation with weaning success in trauma patients: prospective cohort study
    Golnar Sabetian, Mandana Mackie, Naeimehossadat Asmarian, Mahsa Banifatemi, Gregory A. Schmidt, Mansoor Masjedi, Shahram Paydar, Farid Zand
    Journal of Anesthesia.2024; 38(3): 354.     CrossRef
  • Diaphragmatic ultrasound: A new frontier in weaning from mechanical ventilation
    Manoj Kamal, Saikat Sengupta
    Indian Journal of Anaesthesia.2023; 67(Suppl 4): S205.     CrossRef
Case Report
Neurosurgery
A point-of-care evaluation after visual loss following paraclinoid aneurysm repair: the role of sonographic and pupillometer assessment
Giacomo Bertolini, Ernesto Migliorino, Diego Mazzatenta, Carlo Bortolotti, Raffaele Aspide
Received January 9, 2022  Accepted March 17, 2022  Published online July 5, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00045    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 2,340 View
  • 29 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Visual complications represent common deficits following surgical or endovascular repair of paraclinoid aneurysms. Different etiologies should be investigated to prevent devastating consequences. Herein we present a point-of-care evaluation to investigate sudden visual loss after coiling of a paraclinoid aneurysms. A 20-year-old male were admitted for a sudden headache. Head computed tomography showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage and subsequent angiography revealed a 9-mm left supraclinoid aneurysm of the internal carotid artery treated with endovascular coil embolization. Thirty minutes after intensive care unit admission the patient reported a left amaurosis. To exclude secondary etiologies an immediate evaluation with point-of-care devices (color-doppler and B-mode ultrasound and automated pupillometry) were performed. Sonographic evaluations were negative for ischemic/thrombotic events and neurologic pupil index within physiological ranges provide evidence of third cranial nerve responsiveness. The symptomatology resolved progressively over 120 minutes with low-dose steroid therapy, 30° head-of-bed elevation and blood pressure management. Visual deficits can occur after endovascular procedure and should be investigated. Suspected visual loss is a neurological emergency that deserve a prompt evaluation. Ultrasound and automated pupillometry have proved to be an effective, rapid, reliable and non-invasive combination for a clinical decision-making strategy in the management of post-procedural acute visual deficits.
Reviews
Pulmonary
Lung Ultrasound (in the Critically Ill) Superior to CT: the Example of Lung Sliding
Daniel A. Lichtenstein
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):1-8.   Published online February 14, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00955
  • 18,671 View
  • 869 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This review article shows the potential of lung ultrasound in the critically ill (LUCI) to study lung sliding and describes the optimal equipment for its assessment. Then, it analyses the integration of lung sliding within lung ultrasound then whole body critical ultrasound. It describes the place of lung sliding in the BLUE-protocol (bedside lung ultrasound in emergency) (lung and venous ultrasound for diagnosing acute respiratory failure), the FALLS-protocol (fluid administration limited by lung sonography) (the role of lung sliding in circulatory failure), and the SESAME-protocol (sequential assessment of sonography assessing mechanism or origin of severe shock of indistinct cause) (whole body ultrasound in cardiac arrest). In the LUCIFLR project (LUCI favoring limitation of radiations), the consideration of lung sliding allows drastic reduction in irradiation and costs. In conclusion, lung sliding is proposed as a gold standard for indicating the presence of the lung at the chest wall and its correct expansion.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Head-to-toe bedside ultrasound for adult patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Ghislaine Douflé, Laura Dragoi, Diana Morales Castro, Kei Sato, Dirk W. Donker, Nadia Aissaoui, Eddy Fan, Hannah Schaubroeck, Susanna Price, John F. Fraser, Alain Combes
    Intensive Care Medicine.2024; 50(5): 632.     CrossRef
  • Transthoracic needle biopsy for diagnosis of lung cancer
    Dongil Park
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2023; 66(3): 160.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of point-of-care ultrasound lung sliding amplitude in mechanically ventilated patients
    David N. Briganti, Christine E. Choi, Julien Nguyen, Charles W. Lanks
    The Ultrasound Journal.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Humán kadávermodell a légmell ágy melletti ultrahang-diagnosztikájához.
    Noémi Ádám, Gábor Orosz, Máté Berczi, Tamás Ruttkay
    Orvosi Hetilap.2023; 164(46): 1824.     CrossRef
  • Early detection of delayed pneumothorax using lung ultrasound after transthoracic needle lung biopsy: A prospective pilot study
    Jeong Suk Koh, Chaeuk Chung, Ju Ock Kim, Sung Soo Jung, Hee Sun Park, Jeong Eun Lee, Da Hyun Kang, Yoonjoo Kim, Dongil Park
    The Clinical Respiratory Journal.2022; 16(5): 413.     CrossRef
  • Usefulness of Lung Ultrasound Follow‐up in Patients Who Have Recovered From Coronavirus Disease 2019
    Yale Tung‐Chen, Milagros Martí de Gracia, Maria Luz Parra‐Gordo, Aurea Díez‐Tascón, Sergio Agudo‐Fernández, Silvia Ossaba‐Vélez
    Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine.2021; 40(9): 1971.     CrossRef
  • The role of lung ultrasound in COVID-19 disease
    Dirk-André Clevert, Paul S. Sidhu, Adrian Lim, Caroline Ewertsen, Vladimir Mitkov, Maciej Piskunowicz, Paolo Ricci, Núria Bargallo, Adrian P. Brady
    Insights into Imaging.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Acute Care Nephrology
    Nithin Karakala, Daniel Córdoba, Kiran Chandrashekar, Arnaldo Lopez-Ruiz, Luis A. Juncos
    Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease.2021; 28(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • YEARS Algorithm Versus Wells’ Score: Predictive Accuracies in Pulmonary Embolism Based on the Gold Standard CT Pulmonary Angiography*
    Ahmed Abdelaal Ahmed Mahmoud M. Alkhatip, Maria Donnelly, Lindi Snyman, Patrick Conroy, Mohamed Khaled Hamza, Ian Murphy, Andrew Purcell, David McGuire
    Critical Care Medicine.2020; 48(5): 704.     CrossRef
  • Sonographische Bildgebung der Lunge bei COVID-19
    M. Schmid, F. Escher, D.-A. Clevert
    Der Radiologe.2020; 60(10): 919.     CrossRef
  • Lung Ultrasound in Critical Care
    Maddani Shanmukhappa Sagar, Souvik Chaudhuri, Vedaghosh Amara, Sirish Gauni, Tushar Mittal
    Indian Journal of Respiratory Care.2020; 9(2): 141.     CrossRef
  • Current Misconceptions in Lung Ultrasound
    Daniel A. Lichtenstein
    Chest.2019; 156(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • Role of thoracic ultrasound in children with chronic kidney disease
    SaneyaAbd El-Halim Fahmy, NaglaaAbd El-Moneam Abd Allah, AmiraI Al-Masry, Eman Sobh
    The Scientific Journal of Al-Azhar Medical Faculty, Girls.2019; 3(3): 693.     CrossRef
  • Novel approaches to ultrasonography of the lung and pleural space: where are we now?
    Daniel Lichtenstein
    Breathe.2017; 13(2): 100.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Lung Ultrasound in Critically Ill Patients
Jinwoo Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(1):4-9.   Published online February 29, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.1.4
  • 11,165 View
  • 412 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Lung ultrasound (LUS) is an emerging tool for intensivists to diagnose and monitor thoracic diseases of critically ill patients. It is easily applied at the bedside in real time and is free of radiation hazards. In the intensive care units (ICUs) lung ultrasound can be used to diagnose pneumothorax and interstitial syndrome. It can also be used to monitor changes in the lung. However, the major limitations of LUS is that it is highly operator dependent and cannot be applied in patients with thoracic dressings, subcutaenous emphysema or pleural calcifications. This article reviews the basic principles of lung ultrasound and discusses how it can be used in ICUs.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Utilizing Point of Care Ultrasound for Ventilation Liberation: A State-of-the-Art Narrative Review
    Haneen Mallah, Ahmad AL-Tanjy, Muhannad Mahmoud, Lina Alkhdour, Leen Amro, Abdallah Alshurafa, Mu’taz Alshaikh Hasan, Bashar Alzghoul
    JAP Academy Journal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A comparative study between high-flow nasal oxygen therapy and venturi mask oxygen therapy for postoperative laparoscopic bariatric surgery patients with atelectasis: a randomized clinical trial
    Asmaa Ahmed Nabeeh Negmeldin Abdelr Allam, Mayar Hassan Sayed Ahmed Elsersi, Galal Adel Mohamed Abdelreheem Elkady, Amr Fouad Hafez, Mohamed Abdelsalam Aly Algendy
    Ain-Shams Journal of Anesthesiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of transalveolar pressure measurement as a monitoring parameter for lung recruitment in postcardiac surgery hypoxic patients
    Ibrahim Mabrouk Ibrahim, Ahmed Yousef, Amal Sabry, Ayman Khalifa
    Egyptian Journal of Anaesthesia.2021; 37(1): 145.     CrossRef
  • Postoperative care of cardiac surgery patients: A protocolized approach towards enhanced recovery versus the conventional approach
    Moustafa Ibrahim Abd EL-Aal Halwag, Mahar Ahmed Doghiem, Moustafa Abdelaziz Moustafa, Hossam Ossama Ahmed Sorour
    Egyptian Journal of Anaesthesia.2021; 37(1): 410.     CrossRef
Original Article
How to Decrease the Malposition Rate of Central Venous Catheterization: Real-Time Ultrasound-Guided Reposition
Hongjoon Ahn, Gundong Kim, Byulnimhee Cho, Wonjoon Jeong, Yeonho You, Seung Ryu, Jinwoong Lee, Seungwhan Kim, Insool Yoo, Yongchul Cho
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2013;28(4):280-286.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2013.28.4.280
  • 2,785 View
  • 41 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The purpose of this retrospective and prospective study is to evaluate the efficiency of ultrasound (US) guidance as a method of decreasing the malposition rate of central venous catheterization (CVC) in the emergency department (ED).
METHODS
We retrospectively enrolled 379 patients who underwent landmark-guided CVC (Group A) and prospectively enrolled 411 patients who underwent US-guided CVC (Group B) in the ED of a tertiary hospital. Malposition of the CVC tip is identified when the tip is not located in the superior vena cava (SVC). In Group B, we performed US-guided intravascular guide-wire repositioning and then confirmed the location of the CVC tip with chest radiography when the guide-wire was visible in any three other vessels rather than in the approached vessel. In the case of a guide-wire inserted into the right subclavian vein (SCV), the left SCV and both internal jugular veins (IJV) were referred to as the three other vessels. The two subject groups were compared in terms of the malposition rate using Fisher's exact test (significance = p < 0.05).
RESULTS
There were 38 malposition cases out of a total of 790 CVCs. The malposition rates of Groups A and B were 5.5% (21) and 4.1% (17), respectively, and no statistically significant difference in malposition rate between the two groups was found. In Group B, the malposition rate was decreased from 4.1% (17) to 1.2% (5) after the guide-wire was repositioned with US guidance, which led to a statistically significant difference in malposition rate (p < 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS
The authors concluded that repositioning the guide-wire with US guidance increased correct placement of central venous catheters toward the SVC.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Safety and Feasibility of Ultrasound-guided Peripherally Inserted Central Catheterization for Chemo-Delivery
    Tak-Joong Song, Shin-Seok Yang, Woo-Sung Yoon
    Journal of Surgical Ultrasound.2019; 6(1): 14.     CrossRef
  • Single Center Experience of Ultrasonography-guided Bedside Procedures for Surgical Patients
    Dooreh Kim, Dae Hyun Cho, Yun Tae Jung, Jae Gil Lee
    Journal of Surgical Ultrasound.2018; 5(2): 61.     CrossRef
  • Direction of the J-Tip of the Guidewire to Decrease the Malposition Rate of an Internal Jugular Vein Catheter
    Byeong jun Ahn, Sung Uk Cho, Won Joon Jeong, Yeon Ho You, Seung Ryu, Jin Woong Lee, In Sool Yoo, Yong chul Cho
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2015; 30(4): 280.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care