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Original Articles
Trauma
Bedside ultrasonographic evaluation of optic nerve sheath diameter for monitoring of intracranial pressure in traumatic brain injury patients: a cross sectional study in level II trauma care center in India
Sujit J. Kshirsagar, Anandkumar H. Pande, Sanyogita V. Naik, Alok Yadav, Ruchira M. Sakhala, Sangharsh M. Salve, Aysath Nuhaimah, Priyanka Desai
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):155-161.   Published online February 23, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01172
  • 1,196 View
  • 141 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) is an emerging non-invasive, easily accessible, and possibly useful measurement for evaluating changes in intracranial pressure (ICP). The utilization of bedside ultrasonography (USG) to measure ONSD has garnered increased attention due to its portability, real-time capability, and lack of ionizing radiation. The primary aim of the study was to assess whether bedside USG-guided ONSD measurement can reliably predict increased ICP in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. Methods: A total of 95 patients admitted to the trauma intensive care unit was included in this cross sectional study. Patient brain computed tomography (CT) scans and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores were assessed at the time of admission. Bedside USG-guided binocular ONSD was measured and the mean ONSD was noted. Microsoft Excel was used for statistical analysis. Results: Patients with low GCS had higher mean ONSD values (6.4±1.0 mm). A highly significant association was found among the GCS, CT results, and ONSD measurements (P<0.001). Compared to CT scans, the bedside USG ONSD had 86.42% sensitivity and 64.29% specificity for detecting elevated ICP. The positive predictive value of ONSD to identify elevated ICP was 93.33%, and its negative predictive value was 45.00%. ONSD measurement accuracy was 83.16%. Conclusions: Increased ICP can be accurately predicted by bedside USG measurement of ONSD and can be a valuable adjunctive tool in the management of TBI patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Measurement of Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter by Bedside Ultrasound in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury Presenting to Emergency Department: A Review
    Preethy Koshy, Charuta Gadkari
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Trauma
Role of platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio at the time of arrival to the emergency room as a predictor of short-term mortality in trauma patients with severe trauma team activation
Jae Kwang Kim, Kyung Hoon Sun
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):146-154.   Published online February 15, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01319
  • 825 View
  • 72 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Platelet-to-Lymphocyte ratio (PLR) has been studied as a prognostic factor for various diseases and traumas. This study examined the utility of PLR as a tool for predicting 30-day mortality in patients experiencing severe trauma. Methods: This study included 139 patients who experienced trauma and fulfilled ≥1 criteria for activation of the hospital’s severe trauma team. Patients were divided into non-survivor and survivor groups. Mean PLR values were compared between the groups, the optimal PLR cut-off value was determined, and mortality and survival analyses were performed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 26.0. The threshold of statistical significance was P<0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in mean (±standard deviation) PLR between the non-survivor (n=36) and survivor (n=103) groups (53.4±30.1 vs. 89.9±53.3, respectively; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed an optimal PLR cut-off of 65.35 (sensitivity, 0.621; specificity, 0.694, respectively; area under the ROC curve, 0.742), and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a significant difference in mortality rate between the two groups. Conclusions: PLR can be calculated quickly and easily from a routine complete blood count, which is often performed in the emergency department for individuals who experience trauma. The PLR is useful for predicting 30-day mortality in trauma patients with severe trauma team activation.
Review Article
Trauma
Mobilization phases in traumatic brain injury
Tommy Alfandy Nazwar, Ivan Triangto, Gutama Arya Pringga, Farhad Bal’afif, Donny Wisnu Wardana
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(3):261-270.   Published online August 1, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00640
  • 5,291 View
  • 294 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Mobilization in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have shown the improvement of length of stay, infection, long term weakness, and disability. Primary damage as a result of trauma’s direct effect (skull fracture, hematoma, contusion, laceration, and nerve damage) and secondary damage caused by trauma’s indirect effect (microvasculature damage and pro-inflammatory cytokine) result in reduced tissue perfusion & edema. These can be facilitated through mobilization, but several precautions must be recognized as mobilization itself may further deteriorate patient’s condition. Very few studies have discussed in detail regarding mobilizing patients in TBI cases. Therefore, the scope of this review covers the detail of physiological effects, guideline, precautions, and technique of mobilization in patients with TBI.

Citations

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  • Acute orthostatic responses during early mobilisation of patients with acquired brain injury - Innowalk pro versus standing frame
    Matthijs F Wouda, Espen I Bengtson, Ellen Høyer, Alhed P Wesche, Vivien Jørgensen
    Journal of Rehabilitation and Assistive Technologies Engineering.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Trauma
Comparison of admission GCS score to admission GCS-P and FOUR scores for prediction of outcomes among patients with traumatic brain injury in the intensive care unit in India
Nishant Agrawal, Shivakumar S Iyer, Vishwanath Patil, Sampada Kulkarni, Jignesh N Shah, Prashant Jedge
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):226-233.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00570
  • 3,066 View
  • 188 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to determine the predictive power of the Full Outline of Unresponsiveness (FOUR) score and the Glasgow Coma Scale Pupil (GCS-P) score in determining outcomes for traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was used to evaluate patients at 1 month and 6 months after the injury. Methods: We conducted a 15-month prospective observational study. It included 50 TBI patients admitted to the ICU who met our inclusion criteria. We used Pearson’s correlation coefficient to relate coma scales and outcome measures. The predictive value of these scales was determined using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, calculating the area under the curve with a 99% confidence interval. All hypotheses were two-tailed, and significance was defined as P<0.01. Results: In the present study, the GCS-P and FOUR scores among all patients on admission as well as in the subset of patients who were mechanically ventilated were statistically significant and strongly correlated with patient outcomes. The correlation coefficient of the GCS score compared to GCS-P and FOUR scores was higher and statistically significant. The areas under the ROC curve for the GCS, GCS-P, and FOUR scores and the number of computed tomography abnormalities were 0.912, 0.905, 0.937, and 0.324, respectively. Conclusions: The GCS, GCS-P, and FOUR scores are all excellent predictors with a strong positive linear correlation with final outcome prediction. In particular, the GCS score has the best correlation with final outcome.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of Glasgow Coma Scale Full Outline of UnResponsiveness and Glasgow Coma Scale: Pupils Score for Predicting Outcome in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury
    Indu Kapoor, Hemanshu Prabhakar, Arvind Chaturvedi, Charu Mahajan, Abraham L Chawnchhim, Tej P Sinha
    Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2024; 28(3): 256.     CrossRef
  • Development of a Novel Neurological Score Combining GCS and FOUR Scales for Assessment of Neurosurgical Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: GCS-FOUR Scale
    Ali Ansari, Sina Zoghi, Amirabbas Khoshbooei, Mohammad Amin Mosayebi, Maryam Feili, Omid Yousefi, Amin Niakan, Seyed Amin Kouhpayeh, Reza Taheri, Hosseinali Khalili
    World Neurosurgery.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Nephrology
Epidemiology and outcome of an acute kidney injuries in the polytrauma victims admitted at the apex trauma center in Dubai
Bhushan Sudhakar Wankhade, Zeyad Faoor Alrais, Ghaya Zeyad Alrais, Ammar Mohamed Abdel Hadi, Gopala Arun Kumar Naidu, Mohammed Shahid Abbas, Ahmed Tarek Youssef Aboul Kheir, Hasan Hadad, Sundareswaran Sharma, Mohammad Sait
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):217-225.   Published online May 25, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00388
  • 1,940 View
  • 80 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Polytrauma from road accidents is a common cause of hospital admissions and deaths, frequently leading to acute kidney injury (AKI) and impacting patient outcomes. Methods: This retrospective, single-center study included polytrauma victims with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) >25 at a tertiary healthcare center in Dubai. Results: The incidence of AKI in polytrauma victims is 30.5%, associated with higher Carlson comorbidity index (P=0.021) and ISS (P=0.001). Logistic regression shows a significant relationship between ISS and AKI (odds ratio [OR], 1.191; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.150–1.233; P<0.05). The main causes of trauma-induced AKI are hemorrhagic shock (P=0.001), need for massive transfusion (P<0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P=0.001), and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS; P<0.001). On multivariate logistic regression AKI can be predicated by higher ISS (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.00–1.17; P=0.05) and low mixed venous oxygen saturation (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.05–1.22; P<0.001). The development of AKI after polytrauma increases length of stay (LOS)-hospital (P=0.006), LOS-intensive care unit (ICU; P=0.003), need for mechanical ventilation (MV) (P<0.001), ventilator days (P=0.001), and mortality (P<0.001). Conclusions: After polytrauma, the occurrence of AKI leads to prolonged hospital and ICU stays, increased need for mechanical ventilation, more ventilator days, and a higher mortality rate. AKI could significantly impact their prognosis.
Trauma
Selection of appropriate reference creatinine estimate for acute kidney injury diagnosis in patients with severe trauma
Kangho Lee, Dongyeon Ryu, Hohyun Kim, Sungjin Park, Sangbong Lee, Chanik Park, Gilhwan Kim, Sunhyun Kim, Nahyeon Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(1):95-103.   Published online February 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01046
  • 1,584 View
  • 93 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
In patients with severe trauma, the diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI) is important because it is a predictive factor for poor prognosis and can affect patient care. The diagnosis and staging of AKI are based on change in serum creatinine (SCr) levels from baseline. However, baseline creatinine levels in patients with traumatic injuries are often unknown, making the diagnosis of AKI in trauma patients difficult. This study aimed to enhance the accuracy of AKI diagnosis in trauma patients by presenting an appropriate reference creatinine estimate (RCE). Methods: We reviewed adult patients with severe trauma requiring intensive care unit admission between 2015 and 2019 (n=3,228) at a single regional trauma center in South Korea. AKI was diagnosed based on the current guideline published by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes organization. AKI was determined using the following RCEs: estimated SCr75-modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD), trauma MDRD (TMDRD), admission creatinine level, and first-day creatinine nadir. We assessed inclusivity, prognostic ability, and incrementality using the different RCEs. Results: The incidence of AKI varied from 15% to 46% according to the RCE used. The receiver operating characteristic curve of TMDRD used to predict mortality and the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) had the highest value and was statistically significant (0.797, P<0.001; 0.890, P=0.002, respectively). In addition, the use of TMDRD resulted in a mortality prognostic ability and the need for RRT was incremental with AKI stage. Conclusions: In this study, TMDRD was feasible as a RCE, resulting in optimal post-traumatic AKI diagnosis and prognosis.
Case Report
Neurosurgery
Use of droxidopa for blood pressure augmentation after acute spinal cord injury: case reports
Christopher S. Hong, Muhammad K. Effendi, Abdalla A. Ammar, Kent A. Owusu, Mahmoud A. Ammar, Andrew B. Koo, Layton A. Lamsam, Aladine A. Elsamadicy, Gregory A. Kuzmik, Maxwell Laurans, Michael L. DiLuna, Mark L. Landreneau
Received December 3, 2021  Accepted September 14, 2022  Published online December 7, 2022  
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01662    [Epub ahead of print]
  • 3,512 View
  • 112 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Hypotension secondary to autonomic dysfunction is a common complication of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) that may worsen neurologic outcomes. Midodrine, an enteral α-1 agonist, is often used to facilitate weaning intravenous (IV) vasopressors, but its use can be limited by reflex bradycardia. Alternative enteral agents to facilitate this wean in the acute post-SCI setting have not been described. We aim to describe novel application of droxidopa, an enteral precursor of norepinephrine that is approved to treat neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, in the acute post-SCI setting. Droxidopa may be an alternative enteral therapy for those intolerant of midodrine due to reflex bradycardia. We describe two patients suffering traumatic cervical SCI who were successfully weaned off IV vasopressors with droxidopa after failing with midodrine. The first patient was a 64-year-old male who underwent C3–6 laminectomies and fusion after a ten-foot fall resulting in quadriparesis. Post-operatively, the addition of midodrine in an attempt to wean off IV vasopressors resulted in significant reflexive bradycardia. Treatment with droxidopa facilitated rapidly weaning IV vasopressors and transfer to a lower level of care within 72 hours of treatment initiation. The second patient was a 73-year-old male who underwent C3–5 laminectomies and fusion for a traumatic hyperflexion injury causing paraplegia. The addition of midodrine resulted in severe bradycardia, prompting consideration of pacemaker placement. However, with the addition of droxidopa, this was avoided, and the patient was weaned off IV vasopressors on dual oral therapy with midodrine and droxidopa. Droxidopa may be a viable enteral therapy to treat hypotension in patients after acute SCI who are otherwise not tolerating midodrine in order to wean off IV vasopressors. This strategy may avoid pacemaker placement and facilitate shorter stays in the intensive care unit, particularly for patients who are stable but require continued intensive care unit admission for IV vasopressors, which can be cost ineffective and human resource depleting.
Review Article
Neurosurgery
Target temperature management in traumatic brain injury with a focus on adverse events, recognition, and prevention
Kwang Wook Jo
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):483-490.   Published online November 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01291
  • 3,944 View
  • 321 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a critical cause of disability and death worldwide. Many studies have been conducted aimed at achieving favorable neurologic outcomes by reducing secondary brain injury in TBI patients. However, ground-breaking outcomes are still insufficient so far. Because mild-to-moderate hypothermia (32°C–35°C) has been confirmed to help neurological recovery for recovered patients after circulatory arrest, it has been recognized as a major neuroprotective treatment plan for TBI patients. Thereafter, many clinical studies about the effect of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on severe TBI have been conducted. However, efficacy and safety have not been demonstrated in many large-scale randomized controlled studies. Rather, some studies have demonstrated an increase in mortality rate due to complications such as pneumonia, so it is not highly recommended for severe TBI patients. Recently, some studies have shown results suggesting TH may help reperfusion/ischemic injury prevention after surgery in the case of mass lesions, such as acute subdural hematoma, and it has also been shown to be effective in intracranial pressure control. In conclusion, TH is still at the center of neuroprotective therapeutic studies regarding TBI. If proper measures can be taken to mitigate the many adverse events that may occur during the course of treatment, more positive efficacy can be confirmed. In this review, we look into adverse events that may occur during the process of the induction, maintenance, and rewarming of targeted temperature management and consider ways to prevent and address them.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Trends and hotspots in research of traumatic brain injury from 2000 to 2022: A bibliometric study
    Yan-rui Long, Kai Zhao, Fu-chi Zhang, Yu Li, Jun-wen Wang, Hong-quan Niu, Jin Lei
    Neurochemistry International.2024; 172: 105646.     CrossRef
  • Targeted temperature control following traumatic brain injury: ESICM/NACCS best practice consensus recommendations
    Andrea Lavinio, Jonathan P. Coles, Chiara Robba, Marcel Aries, Pierre Bouzat, Dara Chean, Shirin Frisvold, Laura Galarza, Raimund Helbok, Jeroen Hermanides, Mathieu van der Jagt, David K. Menon, Geert Meyfroidt, Jean-Francois Payen, Daniele Poole, Frank R
    Critical Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Severe traumatic brain injury in adults: a review of critical care management
    Siobhan McLernon
    British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing.2023; 19(6): 206.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Trauma
C-reactive protein-albumin ratio and procalcitonin in predicting intensive care unit mortality in traumatic brain injury
Canan Gürsoy, Güven Gürsoy, Semra Gümüş Demirbilek
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):462-467.   Published online August 5, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00052
  • 2,378 View
  • 173 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Prediction of intensive care unit (ICU) mortality in traumatic brain injury (TBI), which is a common cause of death in children and young adults, is important for injury management. Neuroinflammation is responsible for both primary and secondary brain injury, and C-reactive protein-albumin ratio (CAR) has allowed use of biomarkers such as procalcitonin (PCT) in predicting mortality. Here, we compared the performance of CAR and PCT in predicting ICU mortality in TBI.
Methods
Adults with TBI were enrolled in our study. The medical records of 82 isolated TBI patients were reviewed retrospectively.
Results
The mean patient age was 49.0 ± 22.69 years; 59 of all patients (72%) were discharged, and 23 (28%) died. There was a statistically significant difference between PCT and CAR values according to mortality (P<0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.646 with 0.071 standard error for PCT and 0.642 with 0.066 standard error for CAR. The PCT showed a similar AUC of the receiver operating characteristic to CAR.
Conclusions
This study shows that CAR and PCT are usable biomarkers to predict ICU mortality in TBI. When the determined cut-off values are used to predict the course of the disease, the CAR and PCT biomarkers will provide more effective information for treatment planning and for preparation of the family for the treatment process and to manage their outcome expectations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Symptoms and Functional Outcomes Among Traumatic Brain Injury Patients 3- to 12-Months Post-Injury
    Kathryn S. Gerber, Gemayaret Alvarez, Arsham Alamian, Victoria Behar-Zusman, Charles A. Downs
    Journal of Trauma Nursing.2024; 31(2): 72.     CrossRef
  • Association of C-Reactive Protein/Albumin Ratio with Mortality in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Yuyang Liu, Yaheng Tan, Jun Wan, Qiwen Chen, Yuxin Zheng, Wenhao Xu, Peng Wang, Weelic Chong, Xueying Yu, Yu Zhang
    Heliyon.2024; : e33460.     CrossRef
Neurosurgery
Development and internal validation of a nomogram for predicting outcomes in children with traumatic subdural hematoma
Anukoon Kaewborisutsakul, Thara Tunthanathip
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):429-437.   Published online June 23, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01795
  • 2,540 View
  • 209 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
A subdural hematoma (SDH) following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children can lead to unexpected death or disability. The nomogram is a clinical prediction tool used by physicians to provide prognosis advice to parents for making decisions regarding treatment. In the present study, a nomogram for predicting outcomes was developed and validated. In addition, the predictors associated with outcomes in children with traumatic SDH were determined.
Methods
In this retrospective study, 103 children with SDH after TBI were evaluated. According to the King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury classification, the functional outcomes were assessed at hospital discharge and categorized into favorable and unfavorable. The predictors associated with the unfavorable outcomes were analyzed using binary logistic regression. Subsequently, a two-dimensional nomogram was developed for presentation of the predictive model.
Results
The predictive model with the lowest level of Akaike information criterion consisted of hypotension (odds ratio [OR], 9.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0–42.9), Glasgow coma scale scores of 3–8 (OR, 8.2; 95% CI, 1.7–38.9), fixed pupil in one eye (OR, 4.8; 95% CI, 2.6–8.8), and fixed pupils in both eyes (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6–7.1). A midline shift ≥5 mm (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.62–10.73) and co-existing intraventricular hemorrhage (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 0.003–26.1) were also included.
Conclusions
SDH in pediatric TBI can lead to mortality and disability. The predictability level of the nomogram in the present study was excellent, and external validation should be conducted to confirm the performance of the clinical prediction tool.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prognostic factors and clinical nomogram for in-hospital mortality in traumatic brain injury
    Thara Tunthanathip, Nakornchai Phuenpathom, Apisorn Jongjit
    The American Journal of Emergency Medicine.2024; 77: 194.     CrossRef
  • Development of a Clinical Nomogram for Predicting Shunt-Dependent Hydrocephalus
    Avika Trakulpanitkit, Thara Tunthanathip
    Journal of Health and Allied Sciences NU.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prediction performance of the machine learning model in predicting mortality risk in patients with traumatic brain injuries: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Jue Wang, Ming Jing Yin, Han Chun Wen
    BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and internal validation of a nomogram to predict massive blood transfusions in neurosurgical operations
    Kanisorn Sungkaro, Chin Taweesomboonyat, Anukoon Kaewborisutsakul
    Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice.2022; 13: 711.     CrossRef
  • Prediction of massive transfusions in neurosurgical operations using machine learning
    Chin Taweesomboonyat, Anukoon Kaewborisutsakul, Kanisorn Sungkaro
    Asian Journal of Transfusion Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Article
Neurosurgery
Brain-lung interaction: a vicious cycle in traumatic brain injury
Ariana Alejandra Chacón-Aponte, Érika Andrea Durán-Vargas, Jaime Adolfo Arévalo-Carrillo, Iván David Lozada-Martínez, Maria Paz Bolaño-Romero, Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Pedro Grille, Tariq Janjua
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):35-44.   Published online February 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01193
  • 15,415 View
  • 908 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The brain-lung interaction can seriously affect patients with traumatic brain injury, triggering a vicious cycle that worsens patient prognosis. Although the mechanisms of the interaction are not fully elucidated, several hypotheses, notably the “blast injury” theory or “double hit” model, have been proposed and constitute the basis of its development and progression. The brain and lungs strongly interact via complex pathways from the brain to the lungs but also from the lungs to the brain. The main pulmonary disorders that occur after brain injuries are neurogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia, and the principal brain disorders after lung injuries include brain hypoxia and intracranial hypertension. All of these conditions are key considerations for management therapies after traumatic brain injury and need exceptional case-by-case monitoring to avoid neurological or pulmonary complications. This review aims to describe the history, pathophysiology, risk factors, characteristics, and complications of brain-lung and lung-brain interactions and the impact of different old and recent modalities of treatment in the context of traumatic brain injury.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Uncertainty in Neurocritical Care: Recognizing Its Relevance for Clinical Decision-Making
    Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar, William A. Florez-Perdomo, Tariq Janjua
    Indian Journal of Neurotrauma.2024; 21(01): 092.     CrossRef
  • Manejo postoperatorio de resección de tumores cerebrales en la unidad de cuidado intensivo
    Andrés Felipe Naranjo Ramírez, Álvaro de Jesús Medrano Areiza, Bryan Arango Sánchez, Juan Carlos Arango Martínez, Luis Fermín Naranjo Atehortúa
    Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo.2024; 24(2): 140.     CrossRef
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    Greta Zunino, Denise Battaglini, Daniel Agustin Godoy
    Journal of Intensive Medicine.2024; 4(2): 247.     CrossRef
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    Na Zhao, Chao Liu, Xinxin Tian, Juan Yang, Tianen Wang
    Experimental Cell Research.2024; 434(2): 113873.     CrossRef
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    Weijian Yang, Caihua Xi, Haijun Yao, Qiang Yuan, Jun Zhang, Qifang Chen, Gang Wu, Jin Hu
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Wei-Hung Chan, Shih-Ming Huang, Yi-Lin Chiu
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2024; 25(5): 3018.     CrossRef
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    Thao L. Nguyen, Dennis W. Simon, Yi-Chen Lai
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    松 刘
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    Jong-Tae Kim, Kang Song, Sung Woo Han, Dong Hyuk Youn, Harry Jung, Keun-Suh Kim, Hyo-Jung Lee, Ji Young Hong, Yong-Jun Cho, Sung-Min Kang, Jin Pyeong Jeon
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    Shaurya Taran, Sarah Wahlster, Chiara Robba
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    Jia Nong, Patrick M. Glassman, Jacob W. Myerson, Viviana Zuluaga-Ramirez, Alba Rodriguez-Garcia, Alvin Mukalel, Serena Omo-Lamai, Landis R. Walsh, Marco E. Zamora, Xijing Gong, Zhicheng Wang, Kartik Bhamidipati, Raisa Y. Kiseleva, Carlos H. Villa, Colin F
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  • Modulation of MAPK/NF-κB Pathway and NLRP3 Inflammasome by Secondary Metabolites from Red Algae: A Mechanistic Study
    Asmaa Nabil-Adam, Mohamed L. Ashour, Mohamed Attia Shreadah
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  • American Association for the Surgery of Trauma/American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma clinical protocol for management of acute respiratory distress syndrome and severe hypoxemia
    Jason A. Fawley, Christopher J. Tignanelli, Nicole L. Werner, George Kasotakis, Samuel P. Mandell, Nina E. Glass, David J. Dries, Todd W. Costantini, Lena M. Napolitano
    Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery.2023; 95(4): 592.     CrossRef
  • The role of cardiac dysfunction and post-traumatic pulmonary embolism in brain-lung interactions following traumatic brain injury
    Mabrouk Bahloul, Karama Bouchaala, Najeh Baccouche, Kamilia Chtara, Hedi Chelly, Mounir Bouaziz
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Original Articles
Basic science and research
A machine learning model for predicting favorable outcome in severe traumatic brain injury patients after 6 months
Mehdi Nourelahi, Fardad Dadboud, Hosseinali Khalili, Amin Niakan, Hossein Parsaei
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):45-52.   Published online January 21, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00486
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Traumatic brain injury (TBI), which occurs commonly worldwide, is among the more costly of health and socioeconomic problems. Accurate prediction of favorable outcomes in severe TBI patients could assist with optimizing treatment procedures, predicting clinical outcomes, and result in substantial economic savings. Methods: In this study, we examined the capability of a machine learning-based model in predicting “favorable” or “unfavorable” outcomes after 6 months in severe TBI patients using only parameters measured on admission. Three models were developed using logistic regression, random forest, and support vector machines trained on parameters recorded from 2,381 severe TBI patients admitted to the neuro-intensive care unit of Rajaee (Emtiaz) Hospital (Shiraz, Iran) between 2015 and 2017. Model performance was evaluated using three indices: sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. A ten-fold cross-validation method was used to estimate these indices. Results: Overall, the developed models showed excellent performance with the area under the curve around 0.81, sensitivity and specificity of around 0.78. The top-three factors important in predicting 6-month post-trauma survival status in TBI patients are “Glasgow coma scale motor response,” “pupillary reactivity,” and “age.” Conclusions: Machine learning techniques might be used to predict the 6-month outcome in TBI patients using only the parameters measured on admission when the machine learning is trained using a large data set.

Citations

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  • Enhancing hospital course and outcome prediction in patients with traumatic brain injury: A machine learning study
    Guangming Zhu, Burak B Ozkara, Hui Chen, Bo Zhou, Bin Jiang, Victoria Y Ding, Max Wintermark
    The Neuroradiology Journal.2024; 37(1): 74.     CrossRef
  • Machine Learning in Neuroimaging of Traumatic Brain Injury: Current Landscape, Research Gaps, and Future Directions
    Kevin Pierre, Jordan Turetsky, Abheek Raviprasad, Seyedeh Mehrsa Sadat Razavi, Michael Mathelier, Anjali Patel, Brandon Lucke-Wold
    Trauma Care.2024; 4(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • Science fiction or clinical reality: a review of the applications of artificial intelligence along the continuum of trauma care
    Olivia F. Hunter, Frances Perry, Mina Salehi, Hubert Bandurski, Alan Hubbard, Chad G. Ball, S. Morad Hameed
    World Journal of Emergency Surgery.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gastrointestinal failure, big data and intensive care
    Pierre Singer, Eyal Robinson, Orit Raphaeli
    Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care.2023; 26(5): 476.     CrossRef
  • Prediction performance of the machine learning model in predicting mortality risk in patients with traumatic brain injuries: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Jue Wang, Ming Jing Yin, Han Chun Wen
    BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predicting return to work after traumatic brain injury using machine learning and administrative data
    Helena Van Deynse, Wilfried Cools, Viktor-Jan De Deken, Bart Depreitere, Ives Hubloue, Eva Kimpe, Maarten Moens, Karen Pien, Ellen Tisseghem, Griet Van Belleghem, Koen Putman
    International Journal of Medical Informatics.2023; 178: 105201.     CrossRef
  • Fluid-Based Protein Biomarkers in Traumatic Brain Injury: The View from the Bedside
    Denes V. Agoston, Adel Helmy
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(22): 16267.     CrossRef
  • Predicting Outcome in Patients with Brain Injury: Differences between Machine Learning versus Conventional Statistics
    Antonio Cerasa, Gennaro Tartarisco, Roberta Bruschetta, Irene Ciancarelli, Giovanni Morone, Rocco Salvatore Calabrò, Giovanni Pioggia, Paolo Tonin, Marco Iosa
    Biomedicines.2022; 10(9): 2267.     CrossRef
Trauma
Prevalence and clinical impact of vitamin D deficiency in critically ill Korean patients with traumatic injuries: a single-center, prospective, observational study
Kyoung Hoon Lim, Jihoon Jang, Jinyoung Park
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(2):92-98.   Published online April 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00801
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study investigated the prevalence and impact of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) vitamin D) deficiency in critically ill Korean patients with traumatic injuries.
Methods
This prospective observational cohort study assessed the 25(OH) vitamin D status of consecutive trauma patients admitted to the trauma intensive care unit (TICU) of Kyungpook National University Hospital between January and December 2018. We analyzed the prevalence of 25(OH) vitamin D deficiency and its impact on clinical outcomes.
Results
There were no significant differences in the duration of mechanical ventilation (MV), lengths of TICU and hospital stays, and rates of nosocomial infection and mortality between patients with 25(OH) vitamin D <20 ng/ml and those with 25(OH) vitamin D ≥20 ng/ml within 24 hours of TICU admission. The duration of MV and lengths of TICU and hospital stays were shorter and the rate of nosocomial infection was lower in patients with 25(OH) vitamin D level ≥20 ng/ml on day 7 of hospitalization. The duration of MV, lengths of TICU and hospital stays, and nosocomial infection rate were significantly lower in patients with increased concentrations compared with those with decreased concentrations on day 7 of hospitalization, but the mortality rate did not differ significantly.
Conclusions
The 25(OH) vitamin D level measured within 24 hours after TICU admission was unrelated to clinical outcomes in critically ill patients with traumatic injuries. However, patients with increased 25(OH) vitamin D level after 7 days of hospitalization had better clinical outcomes than those with decreased levels.
Trauma
The association between the initial lactate level and need for massive transfusion in severe trauma patients with and without traumatic brain injury
Young Hoon Park, Dong Hyun Ryu, Byung Kook Lee, Dong Hun Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(4):255-262.   Published online November 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00640
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  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Exsanguination is a major cause of death in severe trauma patients. The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic impact of the initial lactate level for massive transfusion (MT) in severe trauma. We divided patients according to subgroups of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and non-TBI.
Methods
This single-institution retrospective study was conducted on patients who were admitted to hospital for severe trauma between January 2016 and December 2017. TBI was defined by a head Abbreviated Injury Scale ≥3. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to analyze the prognostic impact of the lactate level. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between the MT and lactate level. The primary outcome was MT.
Results
Of the 553 patients, MT was performed in 62 patients (11.2%). The area under the curve (AUC) for the lactate level for predicting MT was 0.779 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.742 to 0.813). The AUCs for lactate level in the TBI and non-TBI patients were 0.690 (95% CI, 0.627 to 0.747) and 0.842 (95% CI, 0.796 to 0.881), respectively. In multivariate analyses, the lactate level was independently associated with the MT (odds ratio [OR], 1.179; 95% CI, 1.070 to 1.299). The lactate level was independently associated with MT in non-TBI patients (OR, 1.469; 95% CI, 1.262 to 1.710), but not in TBI patients.
Conclusions
The initial lactate level may be a possible prognostic factor for MT in severe trauma. In TBI patients, however, the initial lactate level was not suitable for predicting MT.

Citations

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  • Association of initial lactate levels and red blood cell transfusion strategy with outcomes after severe trauma: a post hoc analysis of the RESTRIC trial
    Yoshinori Kosaki, Takashi Hongo, Mineji Hayakawa, Daisuke Kudo, Shigeki Kushimoto, Takashi Tagami, Hiromichi Naito, Atsunori Nakao, Tetsuya Yumoto
    World Journal of Emergency Surgery.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Trauma
Usefulness of Rotational Thromboelastometry as a Mortality Predictor of Hyperfibrinolysis in Patients with Severe Trauma
Ji Soo Kim, Il Jae Wang, Seok Ran Yeom, Suck Ju Cho, Jae Hun Kim, June Pill Seok, Seong Hwa Lee, Byung Gwan Bae, Mun Ki Min
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(3):162-169.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00199
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  • 6 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Hemorrhage is the major cause of traumatic death and the leading cause of preventable death. Hyperfibrinolysis is associated with trauma severity. Viscoelastic hemostatic assays show complete clot formation dynamics. The present study was designed to identify the relationship between hyperfibrinolysis and mortality, metabolic acidosis, and coagulopathy in patients with trauma.
Methods
Patients with severe trauma (injury severity score [ISS] of 15 or higher) who were assessed using rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) were included in the present study from January 2017 to December 2017. Variables were obtained from the Korea Trauma Database or the medical charts of the patients. To identify whether hyperfibrinolysis is an independent predictor of mortality, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed.
Results
During the 1-year study period, 190 patients were enrolled. In total, 21 (11.1%) had hyperfibrinolysis according to the ROTEM analysis and 46 (24.2%) died. Patients with hyperfibrinolysis had a higher ISS (P=0.014) and mortality rate (P<0.001) than did those without hyperfibrinolysis. In multivariate Cox analysis, hyperfibrinolysis (hazard ratio [HR], 4.960; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.447 to 10.053), age (HR, 1.033; 95% CI, 1.013 to 1.055), lactic acid level (HR, 1.085; 95% CI, 1.003 to 1.173), and ISS (HR, 1.037; 95% CI, 1.004 to 1.071) were independent predictors of mortality.
Conclusions
Hyperfibrinolysis is associated with increased mortality, worse metabolic acidosis, and severe coagulopathy and is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with trauma.

Citations

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  • A comparative analysis of tranexamic acid dosing strategies in traumatic major hemorrhage
    Finn Gunn, Rheanna Stevenson, Ateeq Almuwallad, Andrea Rossetto, Paul Vulliamy, Karim Brohi, Ross Davenport
    Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery.2024; 96(2): 216.     CrossRef
  • A retrospective validation of ROTEM algorithms for detecting hyperfibrinolysis demonstrates poor agreement for prediction of in-hospital mortality and transfusion requirement in a general, non-cardiac, surgical population
    Leon Rosebery, Matthew Miller, Peter Loizou, Shir Jing Ho, Keith J. Adkins, Kush Deshpande
    Thrombosis Research.2023; 229: 170.     CrossRef
  • Questions about COVID-19 associated coagulopathy: possible answers from the viscoelastic tests
    Vittorio Pavoni, Lara Gianesello, Maddalena Pazzi, Pietro Dattolo, Domenico Prisco
    Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing.2022; 36(1): 55.     CrossRef
  • Clinical value of early assessment of hyperfibrinolysis by rotational thromboelastometry during postpartum hemorrhage for the prediction of severity of bleeding: A multicenter prospective cohort study in the Netherlands
    Marije Tahitu, Paul I. Ramler, Ada Gillissen, Camila Caram‐Deelder, Dacia D. C. A. Henriquez, Moniek P. M. de Maat, Johannes J. Duvekot, Jeroen Eikenboom, Kitty W. M. Bloemenkamp, Thomas van den Akker, Johanna G. van der Bom
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  • ROTEM diagnostic capacity for measuring fibrinolysis in neonatal sepsis
    Maria Lampridou, Rozeta Sokou, Andreas G. Tsantes, Martha Theodoraki, Aikaterini Konstantinidi, Georgios Ioakeimidis, Stefanos Bonovas, Marianna Politou, Serena Valsami, Zoe Iliodromiti, Theodora Boutsikou, Nicoletta Iacovidou, Georgios Nikolopoulos, Argi
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  • The Immunologic Effect of Early Intravenous Two and Four Gram Bolus Dosing of Tranexamic Acid Compared to Placebo in Patients With Severe Traumatic Bleeding (TAMPITI): A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Single-Center Trial
    Philip C. Spinella, Kimberly A. Thomas, Isaiah R. Turnbull, Anja Fuchs, Kelly Bochicchio, Douglas Schuerer, Stacey Reese, Adrian A. Coleoglou Centeno, Christopher B. Horn, Jack Baty, Susan M. Shea, M. Adam Meledeo, Anthony E. Pusateri, Jerrold H. Levy, An
    Frontiers in Immunology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care