Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

ACC : Acute and Critical Care

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
2 "pneumomediastinum"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Case Reports
Two Cases of Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum Complicating Viral Pneumonia Caused by Influenza A Virus, (H1N1 Subtype): A Case Report
Jae Woong Tae, Eun Jin Kim, Woo Jin Jang, Min Jeong Kim, Hae Ri Chon, Eun Soo Jeong, Young Min Koh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2010;25(3):163-167.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2010.25.3.163
  • 2,179 View
  • 24 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Influenza A virus, (H1N1 Subtype), was identified as the cause of outbreaks of febrile respiratory infection in Mexico, the US, Canada and elsewhere during the spring of 2009. In Korea, a novel virus infection showing many variable complications was also pandemic. We report two cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum, complicating viral pneumonia, caused by Influenza A virus, (H1N1 Subtype).
Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum and Subcutaneous Emphysema in Children Infected with H1N1 Virus: A Case Report
Bo Geum Choi, Hye Jung Yun, Yeo Hyang Kim, Myung Chul Hyun
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2010;25(3):155-158.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2010.25.3.155
  • 2,575 View
  • 39 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a rare condition in children which is triggered by respiratory infection and inflammation, although it occurs most commonly in asthmatics. It is caused by alveolar rupture and dissection of air into the mediastinum and hilum, and the prognosis is usually benign. We report two cases of SPM and subcutaneous emphysema complicating pneumonia in children with severe H1N1 infection. The patients were admitted to the intensive care unit and treated with oxygen, inhalation of a bronchodilator, intravenous systemic corticosteroid (methyprednisolone, 2 mg/kg/day for 5 days) and antibiotics, together with antiviral therapy. On day 4 after admission, there was no further evidence of SPM. SPM associated with severe H1N1 infection in children resolves with aggressive supportive care, without progression to pneumothorax. We should remain aware of this air leak complication in children with severe respiratory infection.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care