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Original Article
Safety and Feasibility of Percutaneous Tracheostomy Performed by Medical Intensivists
Hongseok Yoo, So Yeon Lim, Chi Min Park, Gee Young Suh, Kyeongman Jeon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2011;26(4):261-266.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2011.26.4.261
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  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Tracheostomy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the intensive care unit (ICU). After its introduction, percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) has been recognized in western countries as a reliable alternative to surgical tracheostomy. However, data on the safety and feasibility of PDT performed by medical intensivists are limited in Korea.
METHODS
To evaluate the safety and feasibility of PDT performed by medical intensivists and to compare with those of surgical tracheostomy (ST), we retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics of all prospectively registered patients who underwent either PDT or ST in medical ICU from December 2010 to July 2011.
RESULTS
A total of 81 patients underwent tracheostomy over the study period: PDT in 56 (69%) and ST in 25 (31%). One patient in whom major bleeding developed during PDT underwent ST as a substitute for PDT. There were no differences in the demographics, laboratory findings, and parameters of mechanical ventilation between the two groups. Procedure time was significantly shorter in the PDT group (20 [IQR 18-30] min) than that in the ST group (38 [27.5-57.5] min) (p < 0.001). The major complication observed in 24 hours after PDT was bleeding in 6 (11%) patients of the PDT group and 4 (16%) patients of the ST group (p = 0.489). However, surgical interventions for major bleeding were required in 2 patients who underwent.
CONCLUSIONS
PDT performed by medical intensivists was safe and feasible. However, immediate surgical assistance should be available when required.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Safety and Feasibility of Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy Performed by a Neurointensivist Compared with Conventional Surgical Tracheostomy in Neurosurgery Intensive Care Unit
    John Kwon, Yong Oh Kim, Jeong-Am Ryu
    Journal of Neurointensive Care.2019; 2(2): 64.     CrossRef
  • Safety and Feasibility of Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in the Neurocritical Care Unit
    Dong Hyun Lee, Jin-Heon Jeong
    Journal of Neurocritical Care.2018; 11(1): 32.     CrossRef
  • Is Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy Safe to Perform in the Intensive Care Unit?
    Jae Hwa Cho
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2014; 29(2): 57.     CrossRef
  • Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in Critically Ill Patients Taking Antiplatelet Agents
    Sung-Jin Nam, Ji Young Park, Hongyeul Lee, Taehoon Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jong Sun Park, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Young-Jae Cho
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2014; 29(3): 183.     CrossRef
  • Safety and Feasibility of Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy Performed by Intensive Care Trainee
    Daesang Lee, Chi Ryang Chung, Sung Bum Park, Jeong-Am Ryu, Joongbum Cho, Jeong Hoon Yang, Chi-Min Park, Gee Young Suh, Kyeongman Jeon
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2014; 29(2): 64.     CrossRef
  • A Case of Laryngeal Mask Airway-Assisted Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy
    Ji Young Park, Taehoon Lee, Hongyeul Lee, Jae Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Young-Jae Cho
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2013; 28(3): 184.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care