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Randomized Controlled Trials
Pharmacology/Pulmonary
Comparison of Morphine and Remifentanil on the Duration of Weaning from Mechanical Ventilation
Jae Myeong Lee, Seong Heon Lee, Sang Hyun Kwak, Hyeon Hui Kang, Sang Haak Lee, Jae Min Lim, Mi Ae Jeong, Young Joo Lee, Chae Man Lim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(4):281-287.   Published online November 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.4.281
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2016;31(4):381
  • 6,324 View
  • 124 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
A randomized, multicenter, open-label, parallel group study was performed to compare the effects of remifentanil and morphine as analgesic drugs on the duration of weaning time from mechanical ventilation (MV).
METHODS
A total of 96 patients with MV in 6 medical and surgical intensive care units were randomly assigned to either, remifentanil (0.1-0.2 mcg/kg/min, n = 49) or morphine (0.8-35 mg/hr, n = 47) from the weaning start. The weaning time was defined as the total ventilation time minus the sum of controlled mode duration.
RESULTS
Compared with the morphine group, the remifentanil-based analgesic group showed a tendency of shorter weaning time (mean 143.9 hr, 89.7 hr, respectively: p = 0.069). Secondary outcomes such as total ventilation time, successful weaning rate at the 7th of MV day was similar in both groups. There was also no difference in the mortality rate at the 7th and 28th hospital day. Kaplan-Meyer curve for weaning was not different between the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS
Remifentanil usage during the weaning phase tended to decrease weaning time compared with morphine usage.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison between remifentanil and other opioids in adult critically ill patients
    Shuguang Yang, Huiying Zhao, Huixia Wang, Hua Zhang, Youzhong An
    Medicine.2021; 100(38): e27275.     CrossRef
Post-thoracotomy Analgesia & ICU Length of Stay: Comparison of Thoracic Epidrual Morphine Infusion and Lumbar Epidural Plus Intravenous Morphine Infusion
Seok Hwa Yoon, Jung Hyun Lee, Hee Suk Yoon, Yoon Hee Kim, Myung Hoon Na, Seung Pyung Lim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2007;22(2):77-82.
  • 2,063 View
  • 28 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Length of stay in ICU after thoracotomy is related to postoperative pulmonary function and complication which are affected by postoperative pain. For the post-thoracotomy pain control, epidural morphine is commonly used. Although total dose-requirement for analgesia of lumbar epidural morphine is more than the thoracic, lumbar epidural morphine could be substituted the thoracic. Our study compared the effect of patient controlled analgesia using thoracic epidural morphine (TEA group) and lumbar epidural analgesia with patient controlled intravenous analgesia using morphine (LEA+IV group).
METHODS
Sixty patients were randomly assigned into one of the two groups. The epidural taps were done before the induction. In all the patients morphine 0.2 mg/ml was administered via the epidural catheter at the end of surgery. In TEA group, basal infusion rate was 0.1 mg/hr and bolus dose was 0.02 mg. In LEA+IV group, basal infusion rate of epidural morphine was 0.1 mg/hr, patient controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine started when patients arrived at ICU, and basal infusion rate of intravenous morphine was 1.0 mg/hr and bolus dose was 0.8 mg. Pain score, side effect, postoperative length of stay in ICU and hospital were observed.
RESULTS
There were no significant differences between two groups in pain score, side effects, length of stay in ICU and hospital.
CONCLUSIONS
Lumbar epidural analgesia with patient controlled intravenous analgesia using morphine showed similar postoperative analgesia and length of stay in ICU and hospital compared to thoracic epidural analgesia with morphine, so that can substitute the thoracic epidural analgesia.
Comparison of the Efficacy between Ketamine and Morphine on Sedation and Analgesia in Patients with Mechanical Ventilation
Tae Hyung Kim, Chae Man Lim, Tae Sun Shim, Sang Do Lee, Woo Sung Kim, Dong Soon Kim, Won Dong Kim, Younsuck Koh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2000;15(2):82-87.
  • 3,414 View
  • 67 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
While the combination therapy of morphine and benzodiazepine has been recommended as a standard therapy for sedation and analgesia in patients with mechanical ventilation, morphine can suppress respiratory center, and also decrease blood pressure and bowel movement. Because ketamine has analgesic and sedative effects compatible to morphine without depression of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems in addition to the preservation of bowel activity, ketamine may substitute morphine. However, it has not well known such potential advantages of ketamine in patients with mechanical ventilation.
METHODS
Thirty eight patients (male:female=30:8, age=62.6 +/- 11.7 years) with mechanical ventilation were randomized as ketamine and morphine group (n=21 vs. n=17). There was no significant differences in sex, age and APACHE III score at the initiation of mechanical ventilation (ketamine group, morphine group: 79.4 +/- 2.0, 82.0 +/- 20.6). The study duration was 24 h after drug administration and minimum dose, which maintains ventilator-patient synchrony or the status of Ramsay score 3, was used. Ramsay sedation score, hemodynamic variables, respiratory and arterial blood gas variables, and bowel sound were measured at every 4 h. Arterial blood gas analysis was checked at 0, 4, and 24 h.
RESULTS
1) There were no significant differences in Ramsay sedation score and other hemodynamic, respiratory, and arterial blood gas variables in each group. The dose of combined midazolam was not different between two groups (ketamine vs. morphine; 52.1 +/- 11.9 vs. 46.7 +/- 15.1 mg/d; p=0.23). 2) The cases with decreased mean arterial pressure over 25% of the baseline shortly after the drug administration less frequently observed in ketamine group, although the difference did not reach statistical significance (n=2, 9.5% vs. n=5, 29.4%; p=0.12). 3) Bowel movement reduction at 4 h after the drug administration was less in ketamine group (n=1, 4.8% vs. n=6, 35.3%, p=0.03). The difference was not observed at 8 h. 4) Cost of the drug for 24 h was more expensive in ketamine group (dose & cost; 688 506 mg/d & 25,891 7,743 won vs. 40 +/- 18 mg/d, 15,814 +/- 4,853 won; p<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS
Considering the advantages in the hemodynamics and bowel movement, ketamine may substitute morphine for the sedation of patients with mechanical ventilation, if indicated.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care