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5 "airway management"
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Original Articles
Pulmonary
Comparison of preoxygenation with a high-flow nasal cannula and a simple face mask before intubation in Korean patients with head and neck cancer
Jun-Young Jo, Jungpil Yoon, Heeyoon Jang, Wook-Jong Kim, Seungwoo Ku, Seong-Soo Choi
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):61-69.   Published online January 26, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.01543
  • 1,861 View
  • 152 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Although preoxygenation is an essential procedure for safe endotracheal intubation, in some cases securing sufficient time for tracheal intubation may not be possible. Patients with head and neck cancer might have a difficult airway and need a longer time for endotracheal intubation. We hypothesized that the extended apneic period with preoxygenation via a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is beneficial to patients who undergo head and neck surgery compared with preoxygenation with a simple mask. Methods: The study was conducted as a single-center, single-blinded, prospective, randomized controlled trial. Patients were divided into groups based on one of the two preoxygenation methods: HFNC group or simple facemask (mask group). Preoxygenation was performed for 5 minutes with each method, and endotracheal intubation for all patients was performed using a video laryngoscope. Oxygen partial pressures of the arterial blood were compared at the predefined time points. Results: For the primary outcome, the mean arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2 ) immediately after intubation was 454.2 mm Hg (95% confidence interval [CI], 416.9–491.5 mm Hg) in the HFNC group and 370.7 mm Hg (95% CI, 333.7–407.4 mm Hg) in the mask group (P=0.002). The peak PaO2 at 5 minutes after preoxygenation was not statistically different between the groups (P=0.355). Conclusions: Preoxygenation with a HFNC extending to the apneic period before endotracheal intubation may be beneficial in patients with head and neck cancer.
Pulmonary
The feasibility and safety of percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy without endotracheal guidance in the intensive care unit
Ji Eun Kim, Dong Hyun Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):101-107.   Published online February 17, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00906
  • 3,318 View
  • 184 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) is a common procedure in intensive care units (ICUs). Although it is thought to be safe and easily performed at the bedside, PDT usually requires endotracheal guidance, such as bronchoscopy. Here, we assessed the clinical outcomes and safety of PDT conducted without endotracheal guidance.
Methods
In the ICU and coronary ICU at a tertiary hospital, PDT was routinely performed without endotracheal guidance by a single medical intensivist using the Griggs technique PDT kit (Portex Percutaneous Tracheostomy Kit). We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of patients who underwent PDT without endotracheal guidance.
Results
From January 1 to December 31, 2018, 78 patients underwent PDT without endotracheal guidance in the ICU and coronary ICU. The mean age of these subjects was 71.9±11.5 years, and 29 (37.2%) were female. The mean Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score at 24 hours after admission was 25.9±5.8. Fifty patients (64.1%) were on mechanical ventilation during PDT. Failure of the initial PDT attempt occurred in 4 patients (5.1%). In two of them, PDT was aborted and converted to surgical tracheostomy; in the other two patients, PDT was reattempted after endotracheal reintubation, with success. Minor bleeding at the tracheostomy site requiring gauze changes was observed in five patients (6.4%). There were no airway problems requiring therapeutic interventions or procedure-related sequelae.
Conclusions
PDT without endotracheal guidance can be considered safe and feasible.
Case Report
Pulmonary/Thoracic Surgery
Successful Management of Airway Emergency in a Patient with Esophageal Cancer
Samina Park, Hyun Joo Lee, Chang Hyun Kang, Young Tae Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2015;30(2):135-138.   Published online May 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2015.30.2.135
  • 8,042 View
  • 98 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
A 60-year-old man with advanced esophageal cancer was admitted for surgical placement of a feeding jejunostomy tube before commencement of chemoradiotherapy. His esophageal cancer had directly invaded the posterior tracheal wall, inducing a nearly total obstruction of the distal trachea. On the day before the surgery, respiratory failure developed due to tumor progression and tracheal edema. Tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation were attempted without success. Application of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) corrected the patient’s respiratory acidosis and relieved his dyspnea. With full ECMO support, he underwent tracheal stent insertion. Two hours later, he was weaned from ECMO support uneventfully. This was a successful case of tracheal stenting for airway obstruction under rescue veno-venous ECMO.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • An esophageal tumor producing life-threatening tracheal compression in a young adult was resuscitated with a self-inflating resuscitation bag
    Rajnish Kumar, Nishant Sahay, Neeraj Kumar, Soumya Singh
    Perioperative Care and Operating Room Management.2024; 34: 100365.     CrossRef
  • Thoracic oesophageal cancer as a cause of stridor: a literature review
    Robert Munashe Maweni, Venughanan Manikavasagar, Nicholas Sunderland, Sajid Chaudhry
    BMJ Case Reports.2018; : bcr-2018-224872.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Pulmonary
Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in Critically Ill Patients Taking Antiplatelet Agents
Sung Jin Nam, Ji Young Park, Hongyeul Lee, Taehoon Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jong Sun Park, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon Taek Lee, Young Jae Cho
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(3):183-188.   Published online August 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.3.183
  • 5,488 View
  • 77 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) has been considered as an alternative to surgical tracheostomy in intensive care units (ICU), and is widely used for critically ill patients who need prolonged mechanical ventilation. Few studies have reported on PDT performed in critically ill patients taking antiplatelet agents. Our goals are to assess not only the feasibility and safety of PDT, but also bleeding complications in the patients receiving such therapy.
METHODS
In a single institution, PDTs were performed by pulmonologists at the medical ICU bedside using the single tapered dilator technique and assisted by flexible bronchoscopy to confirm a secure puncture site. From March 2011 to February 2013, the patients' demographic and clinical data, procedural parameters, outcomes and complications were analyzed and compared complications between patients taking antiplatelet agents and those not.
RESULTS
PDTs were performed for 138 patients; the median age was 72 years, mean body mass index was 20.3 +/- 4.8 kg/m2, and mean acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 24.4 +/- 9.4. Overall, the procedural success rate was 100% and the total procedural time was 25 +/- 8.5 min. There were no periprocedural life-threatening complications, and no statistical difference in the incidence of bleeding complications between patients who had taken antiplatelet agents and those had not (p = 0.657).
CONCLUSIONS
PDT performed in critically ill patients taking antiplatelet agents was a feasible procedure and was implemented without additional bleeding complications.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Open tracheostomy in patients with dual platelet aggregation inhibitors
    Lorena Zapata-Contreras, Carlos Eduardo Hoyos-Cuervo, María Cristina Florián-Pérez
    Colombian Journal of Anesthesiology.2019; 47(3): 189.     CrossRef
  • Safety of Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheotomy in Patients on Dual Antiplatelet Therapy and Anticoagulation
    Enzo Lüsebrink, Konstantin Stark, Mattis Bertlich, Danny Kupka, Christopher Stremmel, Clemens Scherer, Thomas J. Stocker, Mathias Orban, Tobias Petzold, Nikolaus Kneidinger, Hans-Joachim Stemmler, Steffen Massberg, Martin Orban
    Critical Care Explorations.2019; 1(10): e0050.     CrossRef
  • Safety and Feasibility of Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in the Neurocritical Care Unit
    Dong Hyun Lee, Jin-Heon Jeong
    Journal of Neurocritical Care.2018; 11(1): 32.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of outcomes between vertical and transverse skin incisions in percutaneous tracheostomy for critically ill patients: a retrospective cohort study
    Sung Yoon Lim, Won Gun Kwack, Youlim Kim, Yeon Joo Lee, Jong Sun Park, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Young-Jae Cho
    Critical Care.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Safety and Feasibility of Percutaneous Tracheostomy Performed by Medical Intensivists
Hongseok Yoo, So Yeon Lim, Chi Min Park, Gee Young Suh, Kyeongman Jeon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2011;26(4):261-266.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2011.26.4.261
  • 3,203 View
  • 42 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Tracheostomy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the intensive care unit (ICU). After its introduction, percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) has been recognized in western countries as a reliable alternative to surgical tracheostomy. However, data on the safety and feasibility of PDT performed by medical intensivists are limited in Korea.
METHODS
To evaluate the safety and feasibility of PDT performed by medical intensivists and to compare with those of surgical tracheostomy (ST), we retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics of all prospectively registered patients who underwent either PDT or ST in medical ICU from December 2010 to July 2011.
RESULTS
A total of 81 patients underwent tracheostomy over the study period: PDT in 56 (69%) and ST in 25 (31%). One patient in whom major bleeding developed during PDT underwent ST as a substitute for PDT. There were no differences in the demographics, laboratory findings, and parameters of mechanical ventilation between the two groups. Procedure time was significantly shorter in the PDT group (20 [IQR 18-30] min) than that in the ST group (38 [27.5-57.5] min) (p < 0.001). The major complication observed in 24 hours after PDT was bleeding in 6 (11%) patients of the PDT group and 4 (16%) patients of the ST group (p = 0.489). However, surgical interventions for major bleeding were required in 2 patients who underwent.
CONCLUSIONS
PDT performed by medical intensivists was safe and feasible. However, immediate surgical assistance should be available when required.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Safety and Feasibility of Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy Performed by a Neurointensivist Compared with Conventional Surgical Tracheostomy in Neurosurgery Intensive Care Unit
    John Kwon, Yong Oh Kim, Jeong-Am Ryu
    Journal of Neurointensive Care.2019; 2(2): 64.     CrossRef
  • Safety and Feasibility of Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in the Neurocritical Care Unit
    Dong Hyun Lee, Jin-Heon Jeong
    Journal of Neurocritical Care.2018; 11(1): 32.     CrossRef
  • Is Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy Safe to Perform in the Intensive Care Unit?
    Jae Hwa Cho
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2014; 29(2): 57.     CrossRef
  • Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in Critically Ill Patients Taking Antiplatelet Agents
    Sung-Jin Nam, Ji Young Park, Hongyeul Lee, Taehoon Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jong Sun Park, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Young-Jae Cho
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2014; 29(3): 183.     CrossRef
  • Safety and Feasibility of Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy Performed by Intensive Care Trainee
    Daesang Lee, Chi Ryang Chung, Sung Bum Park, Jeong-Am Ryu, Joongbum Cho, Jeong Hoon Yang, Chi-Min Park, Gee Young Suh, Kyeongman Jeon
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2014; 29(2): 64.     CrossRef
  • A Case of Laryngeal Mask Airway-Assisted Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy
    Ji Young Park, Taehoon Lee, Hongyeul Lee, Jae Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Young-Jae Cho
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2013; 28(3): 184.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care