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3 "Vancomycin"
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Original Articles
Clinical Outcomes of Early Vancomycin Administration before Identification of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Patients with Nosocomial Pneumonia
Yong Woo Seo, Jung Eun Lee, Bo Ram Min, Jae Seok Park, Jeong Eun Kim, Young Yun Jang, Hun Pyo Park, Nam Hee Ryoo, Won Il Choi
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2007;22(1):1-6.
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  • 14 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The aim of this study is to determine the clinical outcomes of early vancomycin administration before identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in patients with nosocomial pneumonia on a ventilator. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients with nosocomial pneumonia in a 20-bed medical ICU during a period of 2 years and 2 months. This study included 52 inpatients, who were admitted for more than 72 hr and had a new or progressive lung infiltrate plus at least two of the following three criteria for pneumonia: abnormal body temperature (>38oC or <35oC), abnormal leukocyte count (>10,000/mm3 or <3,000/mm3), and purulent bronchial secretions. All of the MRSA were identified in tracheal aspirates during mechanical ventilation. RESULTS: A total of 23 patients who received vancomycin prior to identification of MRSA exhibited a 28-day mortality rate of 60%, while 29 patients who received vancomycin after identification of MRSA showed a 28-day mortality rate of 40% (p=0.17). There was no statistically significant difference in severity index and routine laboratory findings between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Early vancomycin administration before identification of MRSA does not appear to affect the mortality rate for patients with nosocomial pneumonia.
Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Liver Transplant Recipients : A Matched Control Study
Ji Yeon Jeong, Sunghwan Kim, Sung Sim Bae, Chul Woo Jung, Kook Hyun Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2006;21(2):95-100.
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  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Despite improvements in surgical technique and immunosuppression, infection following liver transplantation (LT) remains a significant problem. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcuscus (VRE) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become important nosocomial pathogens. This study was undertaken in attempt to evaluate clinical impact of VRE and MRSA in LT recipients.
METHODS
LT recipients with VRE or MRSA colonization from 2001 to 2004 were identified and matched (age, gender, United Network for Organ Sharing status, liver disease, and transplant date) to control groups without MRSA or VRE colonization. Demographics, clinical factors, length of stay, duration of the use of the mechanical ventilator, complications and survival rates were compared with matched controls.
RESULTS
Eleven patients were colonized by VRE (4.7%) and thirty patients by MRSA (13%). The common sites of VRE culture included the tip of the urinary catheter and urine. The VRE colonized group experienced more biliary complications, relaparotomies, longer length of stay at ICU and ward, and longer use of the mechanical ventilator. One year survival rate was lower in the VRE group. MRSA was commonly cultured from sputum, tip of the central venous catheter or intraarterial catheter, and blood. The MRSA group experienced more relaparotomies, pneumonia, longer stay at ICU and ward, and longer use of mechanical ventilator compared to the control. One year survival rate was lower in the MRSA group. Rejection was not associated with VRE or MRSA infection.
CONCLUSIONS
VRE or MRSA colonization is associated with higher incidence of posttransplant complications and lower survival rate than LT recipients without VRE or MRSA colonization. The patients with VRE or MRSA colonization also utilized more hospital resources.
Clinical Characteristics in Patients with Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Colonization or Infection during 5 years in a Private General Hospital
Jin Kyung Kim, Cheol Hong Kim, Seung Yong Han, Hyeon Woo Byun, Woo Jung Park, Heung Jeong Woo, In Gyu Hyun, Jae Jung Lee, Kyu Man Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2005;20(1):54-62.
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  • 18 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is increasing rapidly through the world and is now a major cause of nosocomial infection. The transmission dynamics and factors contributing their dissemination are complex. We conducted a study to investigate clinical characteristics in patients with VRE colonization or infection during recent 5 years. METHODS: 154 cases that had the VRE infection or colonization from January 1, 2000 to April, 2004, were reviewed. We analyzed the risk factors of VRE infection and colonization and also compared various parameters contributing their dissemination between burn and non-burn patients with VRE. RESULTS: Total 212 strains of VRE were isolated from 154 patients. Of 212 strains of VRE, Enterococcus faecium (178 strains, 83.9%) were most common and followed by E. casseliflavus (28 strains, 13.2%), E. faecalis (5 strains, 2.4%) and E. gallinaum (1 strains, 0.5%). The most common place of VRE isolation was in burn intensive care unit (ICU), 95 cases (61.7%); 27 cases (17.5%) in general wards; 17 cases (11.0%) in surgical ICU; 15 cases (9.7%) in medical ICU. Compared with patients with VRE colonization, patients with VRE infection had older age, higher APACHE II scores and high death rate significantly. Then, VRE colonization were more common in burn patients while VRE infection were more common in non-burn patients.
CONCLUSIONS
The findings from this study suggest that VRE infection are not uncommon among hospitalized patients. More strict infection control, close surveillance and judicious use of antibiotics may be warranted to prevent infection and transmission of VRE.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care