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11 "Yeon Joo Lee"
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Original Articles
Pulmonary
Factors related to lung function outcomes in critically ill COVID-19 patients in South Korea
Tae Hun Kim, Myung Jin Song, Sung Yoon Lim, Yeon Joo Lee, Young-Jae Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):100-107.   Published online February 20, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00668
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  • 62 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
New variants of the virus responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continue to emerge. However, little is known about the effect of these variants on clinical outcomes. This study evaluated the risk factors for poor pulmonary lung function test (PFT). Methods: The study retrospectively analyzed 87 patients in a single hospital and followed up by performing PFTs at an outpatient clinic from January 2020 to December 2021. COVID-19 variants were categorized as either a non-delta variant (November 13, 2020–July 6, 2021) or the delta variant (July 7, 2021–January 29, 2022). Results: The median age of the patients was 62 years, and 56 patients (64.4%) were male. Mechanical ventilation (MV) was provided for 52 patients, and 36 (41.4%) had restrictive lung defects. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO ) were lower in patients on MV. Male sex (odds ratio [OR], 0.228) and MV (OR, 4.663) were significant factors for decreased DLCO . The duration of MV was associated with decreased FVC and DLCO . However, the type of variant did not affect the decrease in FVC (P=0.750) and DLCO (P=0.639). Conclusions: Among critically ill COVID-19 patients, 40% had restrictive patterns with decreased DLCO . The reduction of PFT was associated with MV, type of variants.
Pulmonary
Association between mechanical power and intensive care unit mortality in Korean patients under pressure-controlled ventilation
Jae Kyeom Sim, Sang-Min Lee, Hyung Koo Kang, Kyung Chan Kim, Young Sam Kim, Yun Seong Kim, Won-Yeon Lee, Sunghoon Park, So Young Park, Ju-Hee Park, Yun Su Sim, Kwangha Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jin Hwa Lee, Heung Bum Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Ji Young Hong, Won Jun Song, Gee Young Suh
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):91-99.   Published online January 26, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00871
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  • 93 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Mechanical power (MP) has been reported to be associated with clinical outcomes. Because the original MP equation is derived from paralyzed patients under volume-controlled ventilation, its application in practice could be limited in patients receiving pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV). Recently, a simplified equation for patients under PCV was developed. We investigated the association between MP and intensive care unit (ICU) mortality. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of Korean data from the Fourth International Study of Mechanical Ventilation. We extracted data of patients under PCV on day 1 and calculated MP using the following simplified equation: MPPCV = 0.098 ∙ respiratory rate ∙ tidal volume ∙ (ΔPinsp + positive end-expiratory pressure), where ΔPinsp is the change in airway pressure during inspiration. Patients were divided into survivors and non-survivors and then compared. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine association between MPPCV and ICU mortality. The interaction of MPPCV and use of neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) was also analyzed. Results: A total of 125 patients was eligible for final analysis, of whom 38 died in the ICU. MPPCV was higher in non-survivors (17.6 vs. 26.3 J/min, P<0.001). In logistic regression analysis, only MPPCV was significantly associated with ICU mortality (odds ratio, 1.090; 95% confidence interval, 1.029–1.155; P=0.003). There was no significant effect of the interaction between MPPCV and use of NMBA on ICU mortality (P=0.579). Conclusions: MPPCV is associated with ICU mortality in patients mechanically ventilated with PCV mode, regardless of NMBA use.
Rapid response system
Analysis of avoidable cardiopulmonary resuscitation incidents with a part-time rapid response system in place
Jun Yeun Cho, Dong Seon Lee, Yun Young Choi, Jong Sun Park, Young-Jae Cho, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Yeon Joo Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(2):109-117.   Published online April 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.01095
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  • 151 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Although a rapid response system (RRS) can reduce the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in general wards, avoidable CPR cases still occur. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and causes of avoidable CPR.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all adult patients who received CPR between April 2013 and March 2016 (35 months) at a tertiary teaching hospital where a part-time RRS was introduced in October 2012. Four experts reviewed all of the CPR cases and determined whether each event was avoidable.
Results
A total of 192 CPR cases were identified, and the incidence of CPR was 0.190 per 1,000 patient admissions. Of these, 56 (29.2%) were considered potentially avoidable, with the most common cause being doctor error (n=32, 57.1%), followed by delayed do-not-resuscitate (DNR) placement (n=12, 21.4%) and procedural complications (n=5, 8.9%). The percentage of avoidable CPR was significantly lower in the RRS operating time group than in the RRS non-operating time group (20.7% vs. 35.5%; P=0.026). Among 44 avoidable CPR events (excluding cases related to DNR issues), the rapid response team intervened in only three cases (6.8%), and most of the avoidable CPR cases (65.9%) occurred during the non-operating time.
Conclusions
A significant number of avoidable CPR events occurred with a well-functioning, part-time RRS in place. However, RRS operation does appear to lower the occurrence of avoidable CPR. Thus, it is necessary to extend RRS operation time and modify RRS activation criteria. Moreover, policy and cultural changes are needed prior to implementing a full-time RRS.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Changes in the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation before and after implementation of the Life-Sustaining Treatment Decisions Act
    Hyunjae Im, Hyun Woo Choe, Seung-Young Oh, Ho Geol Ryu, Hannah Lee
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(2): 237.     CrossRef
  • A Review of the Commercially Available ECG Detection and Transmission Systems—The Fuzzy Logic Approach in the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Arrest
    Michał Lewandowski
    Micromachines.2021; 12(12): 1489.     CrossRef
Ethics
Transcultural Adaptation and Validation of Quality of Dying and Death Questionnaire in Medical Intensive Care Units in South Korea
Jun Yeun Cho, Jinwoo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Ju-Hee Park, Junghyun Kim, Youlim Kim, Sang Hoon Lee, Jong Sun Park, Young-Jae Cho, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Yeon Joo Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(2):95-101.   Published online May 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2017.00612
  • 8,242 View
  • 159 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Providing palliative care to dying patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) has recently received much attention. Evaluating the quality of dying and death (QODD) is important for appropriate comfort care in the ICU. This study aimed to validate the Korean version of the QODD questionnaire.
Methods
This study included decedents in the ICUs of three tertiary teaching hospitals and one secondary hospital from June 2016 to May 2017. ICU staff members were asked to complete the translated QODD questionnaire and the visual analogue scale (VAS) questionnaire within 48 hours of patient death. The validation process consisted of evaluating construct validity, internal consistency, and interrater reliability.
Results
We obtained 416 completed questionnaires describing 255 decedents. The QODD score was positively correlated with the 100-VAS score (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.348; P<0.001). An evaluation of the internal consistency presented favorable results (calculated Cronbach’s alpha if a given item exceeded 0.8 in all items). The interrater reliability revealed no concordance between doctors and nurses.
Conclusions
The QODD questionnaire was successfully translated and validated in Korean medical ICUs. We hope further studies that use this valuable instrument will be conducted in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors associated with the quality of dying and death and missed nursing care
    Shahin Gahramani, Mokhtar Mahmoudi, Nouri, Sina Valiee
    International Journal of Palliative Nursing.2024; 30(4): 190.     CrossRef
  • A systematic review of instruments measuring the quality of dying and death in Asian countries
    Shuo Xu, Yue Fang, Hanzhang Chen, Kang Sun, Chen Zhang, Yang Liu
    Quality of Life Research.2023; 32(7): 1831.     CrossRef
  • Translation, Validity and Internal Consistency of the Quality of Dying and Death Questionnaire for Brazilian families of patients that died from cancer: a cross-sectional and methodological study
    Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro Paiva, Talita Caroline de Oliveira Valentino, Mirella Mingardi, Marco Antonio de Oliveira, Julia Onishi Franco, Michelle Couto Salerno, Helena Palocci, Tais Cruz de Melo, Carlos Eduardo Paiva
    Sao Paulo Medical Journal.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Russian nurses’ readiness for transcultural care of palliative patients
    Nataliya Kasimovskaya, Natalia Geraskina, Elena Fomina, Svetlana Ivleva, Maria Krivetskaya, Nina Ulianova, Marina Zhosan
    BMC Palliative Care.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Change in perception of the quality of death in the intensive care unit by healthcare workers associated with the implementation of the “well-dying law”
    Ye Jin Lee, Soyeon Ahn, Jun Yeun Cho, Tae Yun Park, Seo Young Yun, Junghyun Kim, Jee-Min Kim, Jinwoo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Jong Sun Park, Young-Jae Cho, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Yeon Joo Lee
    Intensive Care Medicine.2022; 48(3): 281.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Quality of Dying and Death in Korean Intensive Care Units: Perceptions of Nurses
    Haeyoung Lee, Seung-Hye Choi
    Healthcare.2021; 9(1): 40.     CrossRef
  • Validation of the Chinese Version of the Quality of Dying and Death Questionnaire for Family Members of ICU Patients
    Xing-ping Han, Xu Mei, Jing Zhang, Ting-ting Zhang, Ai-ni Yin, Fang Qiu, Meng-jie Liu
    Journal of Pain and Symptom Management.2021; 62(3): 599.     CrossRef
  • Validation of the Quality of Dying and Death Questionnaire among the Chinese populations
    Ying Wang, Mandong Liu, Wallace Chi Ho Chan, Jing Zhou, Iris Chi
    Palliative and Supportive Care.2021; 19(6): 694.     CrossRef
  • The quality of dying and death for patients in intensive care units: a single center pilot study
    Yanghwan Choi, Myoungrin Park, Da Hyun Kang, Jooseon Lee, Jae Young Moon, Heejoon Ahn
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(3): 192.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated With Quality of Death in Korean ICUs As Perceived by Medical Staff: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Survey
    Jun Yeun Cho, Ju-Hee Park, Junghyun Kim, Jinwoo Lee, Jong Sun Park, Young-Jae Cho, Ho Il Yoon, Sang-Min Lee, Jae-Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Yeon Joo Lee
    Critical Care Medicine.2019; 47(9): 1208.     CrossRef
Nursing/Quality Improvement
Transcultural Adaptation and Validation of the Family Satisfaction in the Intensive Care Unit Questionnaire in a Korean Sample
Youlim Kim, Jinsoo Min, Gajin Lim, Jung-Kyu Lee, Hannah Lee, Jinwoo Lee, Kyung Su Kim, Jong Sun Park, Young-Jae Cho, You Hwan Jo, Hogeol Rhu, Kyu-seok Kim, Sang-Min Lee, Yeon Joo Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):60-69.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00962
  • 7,915 View
  • 219 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
A number of questionnaires designed for analyzing family members’ inconvenience and demands in intensive care unit (ICU) care have been developed and validated in North America. The family satisfaction in the intensive care Unit-24 (FS-ICU-24) questionnaire is one of the most widely used of these instruments. This study aimed to translate the FS-ICU-24 questionnaire into Korean and validate the Korean version of the questionnaire.
Methods
The study was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency ICUs at three tertiary hospitals. Relatives of all patients hospitalized for at least 48 hours were enrolled for this study participants. The validation process included the measurement of construct validity, internal consistency, and interrater reliability. The questionnaire consists of 24 items divided between two subscales: satisfaction with care (14 items) and satisfaction with decision making (10 items).
Results
In total, 200 family members of 176 patients from three hospitals completed the FS-ICU-24 questionnaire. Construct validity for the questionnaire was superior to that observed for a visual analog scale (Spearman’s r = 0.84, p < 0.001). Cronbach’s αs were 0.83 and 0.80 for the satisfaction with care and satisfaction with decision making subscales, respectively. The mean (± standard deviation) total FS-ICU-24 score was 75.44 ± 17.70, and participants were most satisfied with consideration of their needs (82.13 ± 21.03) and least satisfied with the atmosphere in the ICU waiting room (35.38 ± 34.84).
Conclusions
The Korean version of the FS-ICU-24 questionnaire demonstrated good validity and could be a useful instrument with which to measure family members’ satisfaction about ICU care.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Effect of a Multifaceted Family Participation Program in an Adult Cardiovascular Surgery ICU*
    Hye Jin Yoo, JaeLan Shim
    Critical Care Medicine.2021; 49(1): 38.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric validation of the Chinese patient- and family satisfaction in the intensive care unit questionnaires
    Veronica Ka Wai Lai, Johnson Ching-Hong Li, Anna Lee
    Journal of Critical Care.2019; 54: 58.     CrossRef
  • Survey of family satisfaction with intensive care units
    Jinsoo Min, Youlim Kim, Jung-Kyu Lee, Hannah Lee, Jinwoo Lee, Kyung Su Kim, Young-Jae Cho, You Hwan Jo, Ho Geol Ryu, Kyuseok Kim, Sang-Min Lee, Yeon Joo Lee
    Medicine.2018; 97(32): e11809.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Cardiology/Pulmonary
Successful Rescue Therapy with Pumpless Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal in a Patient with Persistent Air Leakage due to Empyema
Jaeyoung Cho, Yeon Joo Lee, Jae-Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Young-Jae Cho
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(3):284-290.   Published online November 14, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00185
  • 8,519 View
  • 130 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A young metastatic lung cancer patient developed empyema due to an infection with carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Hydropneumothorax was detected and managed by a tube thoracotomy. However, persistent air leakage through the chest tube was observed due to the presence of a bronchopleural fistula (BPF). As hypercapnic respiratory failure had progressed and the large air leak did not diminish by conservative management, a pumpless extracorporeal lung assist (pECLA) device was inserted. The pECLA allowed the patient to be weaned from mechanical ventilation and the BPF to heal. The present case shows the effective application of pECLA in a patient with empyema complicated with BPF and severe hypercapnic respiratory failure. pECLA enabled us to minimize airway pressure to aid in the closure of the BPF in the mechanically ventilated patient.
Cardiology/Pulmonary
Dual Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support for Bridging Lung Transplantation in Acute Exacerbation of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Dong Jung Kim, Yeon Joo Lee, Jun Sung Kim, Sangheon Park, Young Jae Cho
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(3):207-211.   Published online August 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.3.207
  • 5,995 View
  • 70 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
When patients with severe respiratory failure are treated with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO), severe pulmonary hypertension due to right ventricular (RV) failure is possible. This is a serious complication that requires immediate therapeutic intervention. We report an extraordinary experience of additional venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) support for RV failure in a patient who was being treated with VV-ECMO as a bridge to lung transplantation. A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. While waiting for lung transplantation, he was placed on VV-ECMO and developed RV failure. After insertion of additional VA ECMO, RV dysfunction was dramatically improved. He underwent heart-lung transplantation after 23 days of dual ECMO support.
Original Articles
Pulmonary
Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in Critically Ill Patients Taking Antiplatelet Agents
Sung Jin Nam, Ji Young Park, Hongyeul Lee, Taehoon Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jong Sun Park, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon Taek Lee, Young Jae Cho
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(3):183-188.   Published online August 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.3.183
  • 5,450 View
  • 77 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) has been considered as an alternative to surgical tracheostomy in intensive care units (ICU), and is widely used for critically ill patients who need prolonged mechanical ventilation. Few studies have reported on PDT performed in critically ill patients taking antiplatelet agents. Our goals are to assess not only the feasibility and safety of PDT, but also bleeding complications in the patients receiving such therapy.
METHODS
In a single institution, PDTs were performed by pulmonologists at the medical ICU bedside using the single tapered dilator technique and assisted by flexible bronchoscopy to confirm a secure puncture site. From March 2011 to February 2013, the patients' demographic and clinical data, procedural parameters, outcomes and complications were analyzed and compared complications between patients taking antiplatelet agents and those not.
RESULTS
PDTs were performed for 138 patients; the median age was 72 years, mean body mass index was 20.3 +/- 4.8 kg/m2, and mean acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 24.4 +/- 9.4. Overall, the procedural success rate was 100% and the total procedural time was 25 +/- 8.5 min. There were no periprocedural life-threatening complications, and no statistical difference in the incidence of bleeding complications between patients who had taken antiplatelet agents and those had not (p = 0.657).
CONCLUSIONS
PDT performed in critically ill patients taking antiplatelet agents was a feasible procedure and was implemented without additional bleeding complications.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Open tracheostomy in patients with dual platelet aggregation inhibitors
    Lorena Zapata-Contreras, Carlos Eduardo Hoyos-Cuervo, María Cristina Florián-Pérez
    Colombian Journal of Anesthesiology.2019; 47(3): 189.     CrossRef
  • Safety of Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheotomy in Patients on Dual Antiplatelet Therapy and Anticoagulation
    Enzo Lüsebrink, Konstantin Stark, Mattis Bertlich, Danny Kupka, Christopher Stremmel, Clemens Scherer, Thomas J. Stocker, Mathias Orban, Tobias Petzold, Nikolaus Kneidinger, Hans-Joachim Stemmler, Steffen Massberg, Martin Orban
    Critical Care Explorations.2019; 1(10): e0050.     CrossRef
  • Safety and Feasibility of Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy in the Neurocritical Care Unit
    Dong Hyun Lee, Jin-Heon Jeong
    Journal of Neurocritical Care.2018; 11(1): 32.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of outcomes between vertical and transverse skin incisions in percutaneous tracheostomy for critically ill patients: a retrospective cohort study
    Sung Yoon Lim, Won Gun Kwack, Youlim Kim, Yeon Joo Lee, Jong Sun Park, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Young-Jae Cho
    Critical Care.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pharmacology
The Optimal Dose of Midazolam for Promoting Sleep in Critically Ill Patients: A Pilot Study
Se Joong Kim, Jisoo Park, Yeon Joo Lee, Jong Sun Park, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon Taek Lee, Young Jae Cho
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(3):166-171.   Published online August 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.3.166
  • 15,356 View
  • 99 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Many critically ill patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) experience sleep disruption. Midazolam is commonly used for the sedation of critically ill patients. This pilot study is aimed to identify the optimal dose of midazolam for achieving sound sleep in critically ill patients.
METHODS
This prospective study was conducted in the medical ICU of a tertiary referral hospital. Polysomnography recording was performed over 24 hours to assess the quantity and quality of sleep in patients sedated with midazolam.
RESULTS
A total of five patients were enrolled. Median total sleep time was 494.0 (IQR: 113.5-859.0) min. The majority of sleep was stage 1 (median 82.0 [IQR 60.5-372.5] min) and 2 (median 88.0 [60.5-621.0] min) with scant REM (median 10.0 [6.0-50.5] min) and no stage 3 (0.0 min) sleep. The median number of wakings in 1 hour was 16.1 (IQR: 7.6-28.6). The dose of midazolam showed a positive correlation with total sleep time (r = 0.975, p = 0.005).
CONCLUSIONS
The appropriate quantity of sleep in critically ill patients was achieved with a continuous infusion of 0.02-0.03 mg/kg/h midazolam. However, the quality of sleep was poor. Further study is required for the promotion of quality sleep in such patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effect of prolonged sedation with dexmedetomidine, midazolam, propofol, and sevoflurane on sleep homeostasis in rats
    Brian H. Silverstein, Anjum Parkar, Trent Groenhout, Zuzanna Fracz, Anna M. Fryzel, Christopher W. Fields, Amanda Nelson, Tiecheng Liu, Giancarlo Vanini, George A. Mashour, Dinesh Pal
    British Journal of Anaesthesia.2024; 132(6): 1248.     CrossRef
  • Reliability of the Korean version of the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire
    Jae Kyoung Kim, Ju-Hee Park, Jaeyoung Cho, Sang-Min Lee, Jinwoo Lee
    Acute and Critical Care.2020; 35(3): 164.     CrossRef
  • Pharmacological interventions to improve sleep in hospitalised adults: a systematic review
    Salmaan Kanji, Alexandru Mera, Brian Hutton, Lisa Burry, Erin Rosenberg, Erika MacDonald, Vanessa Luks
    BMJ Open.2016; 6(7): e012108.     CrossRef
  • Sedation in Critically Ill Patients
    Mark Oldham, Margaret A. Pisani
    Critical Care Clinics.2015; 31(3): 563.     CrossRef
Quality Improvement
Successful Implementation of a Rapid Response System in the Department of Internal Medicine
Yeon Joo Lee, Jin Joo Park, Yeonyee E Yoon, Jin Won Kim, Jong Sun Park, Taeyun Kim, Jae Hyuk Lee, Jung Won Suh, You Hwan Jo, Sangheon Park, Kyuseok Kim, Young Jae Cho
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(2):77-82.   Published online May 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.2.77
  • 6,077 View
  • 104 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
A rapid response system (RRS) aims to prevent unexpected patient death due to clinical errors and is becoming an essential part of intensive care. We examined the activity and outcomes of RRS for patients admitted to our institution’s department of internal medicine.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed patients detected by the RRS and admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) from October 2012 through August 2013. We studied the overall activity of the RRS and compared patient outcomes between those admitted via the RRS and those admitted conventionally.
Results
A total of 4,849 alert lists were generated from 2,505 medical service patients. The RRS was activated in 58 patients: A (Admit to ICU), B (Borderline intervention), C (Consultation), and D (Do not resuscitate) in 26 (44.8%), 21 (36.2%), 4 (6.9%), and 7 (12.1%) patients, respectively. Low oxygen saturation was the most common criterion for RRS activation. MICU admission via the RRS resulted in a shorter ICU stay than that via conventional admission (6.2 vs. 9.9 days, p = 0.018).
Conclusions
An RRS can be successfully implemented in medical services. ICU admission via the RRS resulted in a shorter ICU stay than that via conventional admission. Further study is required to determine long-term outcomes.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characteristics and Prognosis of Hospitalized Patients at High Risk of Deterioration Identified by the Rapid Response System: a Multicenter Cohort Study
    Sang Hyuk Kim, Ji Young Hong, Youlim Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effects of a Rapid Response Team on the Clinical Outcomes of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation of Patients Hospitalized in General Wards
    Mi-Jung Yoon, Jin-Hee Park
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2021; 28(4): 491.     CrossRef
  • Rapid response systems in Korea
    Bo Young Lee, Sang-Bum Hong
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(2): 108.     CrossRef
  • Effect of a rapid response system on code rates and in-hospital mortality in medical wards
    Hong Yeul Lee, Jinwoo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Sulhee Kim, Eunjin Yang, Hyun Joo Lee, Hannah Lee, Ho Geol Ryu, Seung-Young Oh, Eun Jin Ha, Sang-Bae Ko, Jaeyoung Cho
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(4): 246.     CrossRef
  • Differences in the Clinical Characteristics of Rapid Response System Activation in Patients Admitted to Medical or Surgical Services
    Yeon Joo Lee, Dong Seon Lee, Hyunju Min, Yun Young Choi, Eun Young Lee, Inae Song, Yeonyee E. Yoon, Jin Won Kim, Jong Sun Park, Young-Jae Cho, Jae Hyuk Lee, Jung-Won Suh, You Hwan, Kyuseok Kim, Sangheon Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2017; 32(4): 688.     CrossRef
Thoracic Surgery
A Closed-Suction Catheter with a Pressure Valve Can Reduce Tracheal Mucosal Injury in Intubated Patients
Jin Heon Jeong, Sung Jin Nam, Young Jae Cho, Yeon Joo Lee, Se Joong Kim, In Ae Song, Sang Heon Park, Young Tae Jeon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):7-12.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.7
  • 7,413 View
  • 159 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Endotracheal suctioning is associated with complications that include bleeding, infection, hypoxemia, cardiovascular instability, and tracheal mucosal injury. Recently, a closed-suction catheter with a pressure valve (Acetrachcare, AceMedical Co., Republic of Korea) was developed. We hypothesized that this new catheter might reduce tracheal mucosal injury compared to a conventional closed-suction catheter (Trachcare, Kimberly-balla RD, USA).
Methods
This prospective, randomized study enrolled medical and surgical patients who required mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. Patients were randomized into two groups: one group was suctioned with the conventional closed-suction catheter (CCC) and the other group was suctioned with the closed-suction catheter with pressure valve (CCPV). Bronchoscopy was performed 48 hours later, and the severity of tracheal mucosal injury was graded on a 5-point scale, as follows: 0 = normal; 1 = erythema or edema; 2 = erosion; 3 = hemorrhage; and 4 = ulceration or necrosis.
Results
A total of 76 patients (37 with CCPV and 39 with CCC) were included. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding demographic characteristics, changes in hemodynamic parameters during suction, incidence of pneumonia, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, or ICU mortality. On bronchoscopic evaluation, the use of the CCPV led to a significant decrease in tracheal mucosal injury (median tracheal mucosal injury grade 1 [IQR 0-1] vs. 2 [IQR 1-3], p = 0.001).
Conclusions
We conclude that the novel closed-suction catheter with pressure valve may reduce tracheal mucosal injury compared to conventional catheters.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • “Study on Device System to Reduce Tracheal Mucosal Injury in Intubation Patients” [ASME Journal of Medical Devices, 2022, 16(3), p. 031006; DOI: 10.1115/1.4054334]

    Journal of Medical Devices.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of the Closed Suction Applied To Patients In Intensive Care Units with Different Techniques: A Nonrandomized Controlled Trial
    Zuhal GÜLSOY, Şerife KARAGÖZOĞLU
    Cumhuriyet Medical Journal.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care