Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

ACC : Acute and Critical Care

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
1 "Nikita Ashcherkin"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Original Article
Pulmonary
Are sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors associated with improved outcomes in diabetic patients admitted to intensive care units with septic shock?
Nikita Ashcherkin, Abdelmohaymin A. Abdalla, Simran Gupta, Shubhang Bhatt, Claire I. Yee, Rodrigo Cartin-Ceba
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(2):251-256.   Published online May 14, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.01046
  • 529 View
  • 40 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) have been shown to reduce organ dysfunction in renal and cardiovascular disease. There are limited data on the role of SGLT2i in acute organ dysfunction. We conducted a study to assess the effect of SGLT2i taken prior to intensive care unit (ICU) admission in diabetic patients admitted with septic shock. Methods: This retrospective cohort study used electronic medical records and included diabetic patients admitted to the ICU with septic shock. We compared diabetic patients on SGLT2i to those who were not on SGLT2i prior to admission. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality, and secondary outcomes included hospital and ICU length of stay, use of renal replacement therapy, and 28- and 90-day mortality. Results: A total of 98 diabetic patients was included in the study, 36 in the SGLT2i group and 62 in the non-SGLT2i group. The Sequential Organ Failure Assessment and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III scores were similar in the groups. Inpatient mortality was significantly lower in the SGLT2i group (5.6% vs. 27.4%, P=0.008). There was no significant difference in secondary outcomes. Conclusions: Our study found that diabetic patients on SGLT2i prior to hospitalization who were admitted to the ICU with septic shock had lower inpatient mortality compared to patients not on SGLT2i.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care