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Case Report
Nephrology
Sudden Intraoperative Hyperkalemia during Laparoscopic Radical Nephrectomy in a Patient with Underlying Renal Insufficiency
Sung Hoon Jung, Yun-Joung Han, Sang Ho Shin, Hyo Seon Lee, Ji Young Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2017;33(4):271-275.   Published online November 21, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2016.00696
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  • 111 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
We experienced a case of severe intraoperative hyperkalemia during laparoscopic radical nephrectomy in a 60-year-old male patient with renal insufficiency, whose hypertension had been managed by preoperative angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) and adrenergic beta-antagonist. After renal vessel ligation, his intraoperative potassium concentration suddenly increased to 7.0 mEq/L, but his electrocardiography (ECG) did not show any significant change. While preoperative ARB therapy has been regarded as a contributing factor for further aggravation of underlying renal insufficiency, we assumed that nephrectomy itself and rhabdomyolysis caused by surgical trauma also aggravated the underlying renal dysfunction and resulted in sudden hyperkalemia. Hyperkalemia was managed successfully with calcium gluconate, insulin, furosemide and crystalloid loading during the intraoperative and immediate postoperative periods, and potassium concentration decreased to 5.0 mEq/L at 8 hours after the operation. The patient’s hospital course was uncomplicated, but his renal function deteriorated further.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Acute Intraoperative Hyperkalemia During Robot-Assisted Radical Cystectomy: A Case Report
    Nivedhyaa Srinivasaraghavan, Vallary Modh, Arun Menon
    A&A Practice.2022; 16(12): e01650.     CrossRef
Original Article
Pulmonary
The Use of Lung Ultrasound in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit
Hyung Koo Kang, Hyo Jin So, Deok Hee Kim, Hyeon-Kyoung Koo, Hye Kyeong Park, Sung-Soon Lee, Hoon Jung
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(4):323-332.   Published online November 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00318
  • 8,123 View
  • 253 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Pulmonary complications including pneumonia and pulmonary edema frequently develop in critically ill surgical patients. Lung ultrasound (LUS) is increasingly used as a powerful diagnostic tool for pulmonary complications. The purpose of this study was to report how LUS is used in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU).
Methods
This study retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 67 patients who underwent LUS in surgical ICU between May 2016 and December 2016.
Results
The indication for LUS included hypoxemia (n = 44, 65.7%), abnormal chest radiographs without hypoxemia (n = 17, 25.4%), fever without both hypoxemia and abnormal chest radiographs (n = 4, 6.0%), and difficult weaning (n = 2, 3.0%). Among 67 patients, 55 patients were diagnosed with pulmonary edema (n = 27, 41.8%), pneumonia (n = 20, 29.9%), diffuse interstitial pattern with anterior consolidation (n = 6, 10.9%), pneumothorax with effusion (n = 1, 1.5%), and diaphragm dysfunction (n = 1, 1.5%), respectively, via LUS. LUS results did not indicate lung complications for 12 patients. Based on the location of space opacification on the chest radiographs, among 45 patients with bilateral abnormality and normal findings, three (6.7%) and two (4.4%) patients were finally diagnosed with pneumonia and atelectasis, respectively. Furthermore, among 34 patients with unilateral abnormality and normal findings, two patients (5.9%) were finally diagnosed with pulmonary edema. There were 27 patients who were initially diagnosed with pulmonary edema via LUS. This diagnosis was later confirmed by other tests. There were 20 patients who were initially diagnosed with pneumonia via LUS. Among them, 16 and 4 patients were finally diagnosed with pneumonia and atelectasis, respectively.
Conclusions
LUS is useful to detect pulmonary complications including pulmonary edema and pneumonia in surgically ill patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill
    Jin Sun Cho
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2017; 32(4): 356.     CrossRef
Guideline
Pulmonary
Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Young-Jae Cho, Jae Young Moon, Ein-Soon Shin, Je Hyeong Kim, Hoon Jung, So Young Park, Ho Cheol Kim, Yun Su Sim, Chin Kook Rhee, Jaemin Lim, Seok Jeong Lee, Won-Yeon Lee, Hyun Jeong Lee, Sang Hyun Kwak, Eun Kyeong Kang, Kyung Soo Chung, Won-Il Choi, The Korean Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Consensus Group
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(2):76-100.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.76
  • 16,740 View
  • 351 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between mechanical power and intensive care unit mortality in Korean patients under pressure-controlled ventilation
    Jae Kyeom Sim, Sang-Min Lee, Hyung Koo Kang, Kyung Chan Kim, Young Sam Kim, Yun Seong Kim, Won-Yeon Lee, Sunghoon Park, So Young Park, Ju-Hee Park, Yun Su Sim, Kwangha Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jin Hwa Lee, Heung Bum Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Ji Young Hong
    Acute and Critical Care.2024; 39(1): 91.     CrossRef
  • Predicting factors associated with prolonged intensive care unit stay of patients with COVID-19
    Won Ho Han, Jae Hoon Lee, June Young Chun, Young Ju Choi, Youseok Kim, Mira Han, Jee Hee Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(1): 41.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: invasive mechanical ventilation
    Young Sam Kim
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 151.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Jin-Young Kim, Sang-Bum Hong
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 157.     CrossRef
  • Prolonged glucocorticoid treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome – Authors' reply
    Rob Mac Sweeney, Daniel F McAuley
    The Lancet.2017; 389(10078): 1516.     CrossRef
  • Prolonged Glucocorticoid Treatment in ARDS: Impact on Intensive Care Unit-Acquired Weakness
    Gianfranco Umberto Meduri, Andreas Schwingshackl, Greet Hermans
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Report
Cardiology
Catecholamine-Induced Cardiomyopathy associated with Neuroblastoma and Treated with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Bridge to Recovery
Junggu Yi, Si Oh Kim, Jun-mo Park, Sung-hye Byun, Hoon Jung, Seong Wook Hong
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2015;30(4):299-302.   Published online November 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2015.30.4.299
  • 5,085 View
  • 89 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy associated with neuroblastoma is rarely reported. We report a case of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy associated with neuroblastoma in a 33-month-old female that was treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). She was tentatively diagnosed with acute myocarditis and presented with hypertension. Because of rapid patient deterioration despite pharmacological treatments, ECMO was applied. ECMO can be helpful in cases of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy associated with neuroblastoma.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease: manifestations, pathophysiology, vaccination, and long-term implication
    Adel Abdel Moneim, Marwa A. Radwan, Ahmed I. Yousef
    Current Medical Research and Opinion.2022; 38(7): 1071.     CrossRef
Original Article
Cardiology
The Effect of the Valsalva Maneuver on the External Jugular Vein
Ho Sik Moon, Sung Hoon Jung, Sie Hyeon Yoo, Jae Young Ji, Hae Jin Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2015;30(3):158-163.   Published online August 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2015.30.3.158
  • 10,373 View
  • 98 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The external jugular vein (EJV) is a useful intravenous (IV) cannulation site for anesthesiologists, although it has a relatively high failure rate. Unlike other central veins, visualization of the EJV is important during IV cannulation, and the Valsalva maneuver distends the jugular venous system. However, the relationship between the maneuver and EJV visibility remains unknown. This study compared EJV visibility before and after the Valsalva maneuver.
Methods
This was a prospective observational study that included 200 participants. After the induction of anesthesia, EJV visibility grade, depth from the skin to the EJV superficial surface (EJV depth), and EJV cross-sectional area (CSA) before the Valsalva maneuver were measured. The same parameters were measured after the Valsalva maneuver was performed. The EJV visibility grade was defined as grade A: good appearance and good palpation, grade B: poor appearance and good palpation, and grade C: poor appearance and poor palpation.
Results
Patient body mass index and EJV depth affected the EJV visibility grade before the Valsalva maneuver (p < 0.05), although EJV CSA did not. The Valsalva maneuver distended EJV CSA and reduced EJV depth, although these changes were not correlated with EJV visibility grade. With regard to EJV visibility, 34.0% of grade B cases and 20.0% of grade C cases were improved by the Valsalva maneuver.
Conclusions
Although the Valsalva maneuver improved EJV CSA and EJV depth, it did not greatly affect EJV visibility grade.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care