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Review Article
Ethics
Impact of institutional case volume on intensive care unit mortality
Christine Kang, Ho Geol Ryu
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):151-159.   Published online May 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00689
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  • 153 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The primary aim of this review is to explore current knowledge on the relationship between institutional intensive care unit (ICU) patient volume and patient outcomes. Studies indicate that a higher institutional ICU patient volume is positively correlated with patient survival. Although the exact mechanism underlying this association remains unclear, several studies have proposed that the cumulative experience of physicians and selective referral between institutions may play a role. The overall ICU mortality rate in Korea is relatively high compared to other developed countries. A distinctive aspect of critical care in Korea is the existence of significant disparities in the quality of care and services provided across regions and hospitals. Addressing these disparities and optimizing the management of critically ill patients necessitates thoroughly trained intensivists who are well-versed in the latest clinical practice guidelines. A fully functioning unit with adequate patient throughput is also essential for maintaining consistent and reliable quality of patient care. However, the positive impact of ICU volume on mortality outcomes is also linked to complex organizational factors, such as multidisciplinary rounds, nurse staffing and education, the presence of a clinical pharmacist, care protocols for weaning and sedation, and a culture of teamwork and communication. Despite some inconsistencies in the association between ICU patient volume and patient outcomes, which are thought to arise from differences in healthcare systems, ICU case volume significantly affects patient outcomes and should be taken into account when formulating related healthcare policies.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Case volume and specialization in critically ill emergency patients: a nationwide cohort study in Japanese ICUs
    Jun Fujinaga, Takanao Otake, Takehide Umeda, Toshio Fukuoka
    Journal of Intensive Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Article
Ethics
Changes in the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation before and after implementation of the Life-Sustaining Treatment Decisions Act
Hyunjae Im, Hyun Woo Choe, Seung-Young Oh, Ho Geol Ryu, Hannah Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(2):237-246.   Published online February 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01095
  • 4,082 View
  • 199 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
The Life-Sustaining Treatment (LST) Decisions Act allows withholding and withdrawal of LST, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In the present study, the incidence of CPR before and after implementation of the Act was compared.
Methods
This was a retrospective review involving hospitalized patients who underwent CPR at a single center between February 2016 and January 2020 (pre-implementation period, February 2016 to January 2018; post-implementation period, February 2018 to January 2020). The primary outcome was monthly incidence of CPR per 1,000 admissions. The secondary outcomes were duration of CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) rate, 24-hour survival rate, and survival-to-discharge rate. The study outcomes were compared before and after implementation of the Act.
Results
A total of 867 patients who underwent CPR was included in the analysis. The incidence of CPR per 1,000 admissions showed no significant difference before and after implementation of the Act (3.02±0.68 vs. 2.81±0.75, P=0.255). The ROSC rate (67.20±0.11 vs. 70.99±0.12, P=0.008) and survival to discharge rate (20.24±0.09 vs. 22.40±0.12, P=0.029) were higher after implementation of the Act than before implementation.
Conclusions
The incidence of CPR did not significantly change for 2 years after implementation of the Act. Further studies are needed to assess the changes in trends in the decisions of CPR and other LSTs in real-world practice.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characteristics and outcomes of patients with do-not-resuscitate and physician orders for life-sustaining treatment in a medical intensive care unit: a retrospective cohort study
    Song-I Lee, Ye-Rin Ju, Da Hyun Kang, Jeong Eun Lee
    BMC Palliative Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • For the Universal Right to Access Quality End-of-Life Care in Korea: Broadening Our Perspective After the 2018 Life-Sustaining Treatment Decisions Act
    Hye Yoon Park, Min Sun Kim, Shin Hye Yoo, Jung Lee, In Gyu Song, So Yeon Jeon, Eun Kyung Choi
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the end-of-life decisions of patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia after the enforcement of the life-sustaining treatment decision act in Korea
    Ae-Rin Baek, Sang-Bum Hong, Soohyun Bae, Hye Kyeong Park, Changhwan Kim, Hyun-Kyung Lee, Woo Hyun Cho, Jin Hyoung Kim, Youjin Chang, Heung Bum Lee, Hyun-Il Gil, Beomsu Shin, Kwang Ha Yoo, Jae Young Moon, Jee Youn Oh, Kyung Hoon Min, Kyeongman Jeon, Moon S
    BMC Medical Ethics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Will implementation of the Life-sustaining Treatment Decisions Act reduce the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation?
    In-Ae Song
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(2): 256.     CrossRef
  • Effect of life-sustaining treatment decision law on pediatric in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation rate: A Korean population-based study
    Jaeyoung Choi, Ah Young Choi, Esther Park, Meong Hi Son, Joongbum Cho
    Resuscitation.2022; 180: 38.     CrossRef
Brief Communication
Intensivist/Policy
Experience of augmenting critical care capacity in Daegu during COVID-19 incident in South Korea
Je Hyeong Kim, Suk-Kyung Hong, Younghwan Kim, Ho Geol Ryu, Chi-Min Park, Young Seok Lee, Sung Jin Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(2):110-114.   Published online May 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00275
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  • 162 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Activities and Roles of Trauma Surgeons in the Treatment of COVID-19 Patients
    Younghwan Kim, Seok Hwa Youn
    Journal of Acute Care Surgery.2023; 13(2): 43.     CrossRef
  • Inhalation of Origanum majorana L. essential oil while working reduces perceived stress and anxiety levels of nurses in a COVID-19 intensive care unit: a randomized controlled trial
    Sang Wook Lee, You Kyoung Shin, Jeong-Min Lee, Geun Hee Seol
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What happened during the period from senior medical students’ withdrawal of their applications to take the Korean Medical Licensing Examination in August 2020 to their taking the licensing examination in February 2021
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 3.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of clinical characteristics and hospital mortality in critically ill patients without COVID-19 before and during the COVID-19 pandemic: a multicenter, retrospective, propensity score-matched study
    Sua Kim, Hangseok Choi, Jae Kyeom Sim, Won Jai Jung, Young Seok Lee, Je Hyeong Kim
    Annals of Intensive Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Correlation Between Third Dose of COVID-19 Vaccines and Regional Case Fatality Rates During the Omicron Wave in Korea
    Youngook Jang, In Joong Kim, Sung-Sil Moon, Sun Bean Kim, Jacob Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparity and the risk of contracting COVID-19 in South Korea: an NHIS-COVID-19 database cohort study
    Tak Kyu Oh, Jae-Wook Choi, In-Ae Song
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Intensive Care Unit Patient Load and Demand With Mortality Rates in US Department of Veterans Affairs Hospitals During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Dawn M. Bravata, Anthony J. Perkins, Laura J. Myers, Greg Arling, Ying Zhang, Alan J. Zillich, Lindsey Reese, Andrew Dysangco, Rajiv Agarwal, Jennifer Myers, Charles Austin, Ali Sexson, Samuel J. Leonard, Sharmistha Dev, Salomeh Keyhani
    JAMA Network Open.2021; 4(1): e2034266.     CrossRef
  • Impact of staffing model conversion from a mandatory critical care consultation model to a closed unit model in the medical intensive care unit
    Sung Jun Ko, Jaeyoung Cho, Sun Mi Choi, Young Sik Park, Chang-Hoon Lee, Chul-Gyu Yoo, Jinwoo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Robert Jeenchen Chen
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(10): e0259092.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Rapid response system
Effectiveness of a daytime rapid response system in hospitalized surgical ward patients
Eunjin Yang, Hannah Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Sulhee Kim, Ho Geol Ryu, Hyun Joo Lee, Jinwoo Lee, Seung-Young Oh
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(2):77-86.   Published online May 13, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00661
  • 6,436 View
  • 212 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Clinical deteriorations during hospitalization are often preventable with a rapid response system (RRS). We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a daytime RRS for surgical hospitalized patients.
Methods
A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 20 general surgical wards at a 1,779-bed University hospital from August 2013 to July 2017 (August 2013 to July 2015, pre-RRS-period; August 2015 to July 2017, post-RRS-period). The primary outcome was incidence of cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) when the RRS was operating. The secondary outcomes were the incidence of total and preventable cardiopulmonary arrest, in-hospital mortality, the percentage of “do not resuscitate” orders, and the survival of discharged CPA patients.
Results
The relative risk (RR) of CPA per 1,000 admissions during RRS operational hours (weekdays from 7 AM to 7 PM) in the post-RRS-period compared to the pre-RRS-period was 0.53 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.25 to 1.13; P=0.099) and the RR of total CPA regardless of RRS operating hours was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.46 to 1.28; P=0.301). The preventable CPA after RRS implementation was significantly lower than that before RRS implementation (RR, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.11 to 0.88; P=0.028). There were no statistical differences in in-hospital mortality and the survival rate of patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. Do-not-resuscitate decisions significantly increased during after RRS implementation periods compared to pre-RRS periods (RR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.40 to 2.59; P<0.001).
Conclusions
The day-time implementation of the RRS did not significantly reduce the rate of CPA whereas the system effectively reduced the rate of preventable CPA during periods when the system was operating.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Development and Validation of a Machine Learning Algorithm Using Clinical Pages to Predict Imminent Clinical Deterioration
    Bryan D. Steitz, Allison B. McCoy, Thomas J. Reese, Siru Liu, Liza Weavind, Kipp Shipley, Elise Russo, Adam Wright
    Journal of General Internal Medicine.2024; 39(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • Effects of a Rapid Response Team on Patient Outcomes: A Systematic Review
    Qiuxia Zhang, Khuan Lee, Zawiah Mansor, Iskasymar Ismail, Yi Guo, Qiao Xiao, Poh Ying Lim
    Heart & Lung.2024; 63: 51.     CrossRef
  • Clinical significance of acute care surgery system as a part of hospital medical emergency team for hospitalized patients
    Kyoung Won Yoon, Kyoungjin Choi, Keesang Yoo, Eunmi Gil, Chi-Min Park
    Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research.2023; 104(1): 43.     CrossRef
  • The associations between rapid response systems and their components with patient outcomes: A scoping review
    Rebecca J. Piasecki, Cheryl R. Dennison Himmelfarb, Kelly T. Gleason, Rachel M. Justice, Elizabeth A. Hunt
    International Journal of Nursing Studies Advances.2023; 5: 100134.     CrossRef
  • Changes in the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation before and after implementation of the Life-Sustaining Treatment Decisions Act
    Hyunjae Im, Hyun Woo Choe, Seung-Young Oh, Ho Geol Ryu, Hannah Lee
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(2): 237.     CrossRef
  • Estructura y función de los equipos de respuesta rápida para la atención de adultos en contextos hospitalarios de alta complejidad: Revisión sistemática de alcance
    Juliana Vanessa Rincón-López, Diego Larrotta-Castillo, Kelly Estrada-Orozco, Hernando Gaitán-Duarte
    Revista Colombiana de Obstetricia y Ginecología.2021; 72(2): 171.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and Prognosis of Hospitalized Patients at High Risk of Deterioration Identified by the Rapid Response System: a Multicenter Cohort Study
    Sang Hyuk Kim, Ji Young Hong, Youlim Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effects of a Rapid Response Team on the Clinical Outcomes of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation of Patients Hospitalized in General Wards
    Mi-Jung Yoon, Jin-Hee Park
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2021; 28(4): 491.     CrossRef
Rapid response system
Effect of a rapid response system on code rates and in-hospital mortality in medical wards
Hong Yeul Lee, Jinwoo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Sulhee Kim, Eunjin Yang, Hyun Joo Lee, Hannah Lee, Ho Geol Ryu, Seung-Young Oh, Eun Jin Ha, Sang-Bae Ko, Jaeyoung Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(4):246-254.   Published online November 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00668
  • 6,179 View
  • 197 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
To determine the effects of implementing a rapid response system (RRS) on code rates and in-hospital mortality in medical wards.
Methods
This retrospective study included adult patients admitted to medical wards at Seoul National University Hospital between July 12, 2016 and March 12, 2018; the sample comprised 4,224 patients admitted 10 months before RRS implementation and 4,168 patients admitted 10 months following RRS implementation. Our RRS only worked during the daytime (7 AM to 7 PM) on weekdays. We compared code rates and in-hospital mortality rates between the preintervention and postintervention groups.
Results
There were 62.3 RRS activations per 1,000 admissions. The most common reasons for RRS activation were tachypnea or hypopnea (44%), hypoxia (31%), and tachycardia or bradycardia (21%). Code rates from medical wards during RRS operating times significantly decreased from 3.55 to 0.96 per 1,000 admissions (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10 to 0.87; P=0.028) after RRS implementation. However, code rates from medical wards during RRS nonoperating times did not differ between the preintervention and postintervention groups (2.60 vs. 3.12 per 1,000 admissions; aOR, 1.23; 95% CI, 0.55 to 2.76; P=0.614). In-hospital mortality significantly decreased from 56.3 to 42.7 per 1,000 admissions after RRS implementation (aOR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.97; P=0.024).
Conclusions
Implementation of an RRS was associated with significant reductions in code rates during RRS operating times and in-hospital mortality in medical wards.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The role of emergency medical services in the management of in-hospital emergencies: Causes and outcomes of emergency calls – A descriptive retrospective register-based study
    Henna Myrskykari, Timo Iirola, Hilla Nordquist
    Australasian Emergency Care.2024; 27(1): 42.     CrossRef
  • Effects of a Rapid Response Team on Patient Outcomes: A Systematic Review
    Qiuxia Zhang, Khuan Lee, Zawiah Mansor, Iskasymar Ismail, Yi Guo, Qiao Xiao, Poh Ying Lim
    Heart & Lung.2024; 63: 51.     CrossRef
  • Society of Critical Care Medicine Guidelines on Recognizing and Responding to Clinical Deterioration Outside the ICU: 2023
    Kimia Honarmand, Randy S. Wax, Daleen Penoyer, Geoffery Lighthall, Valerie Danesh, Bram Rochwerg, Michael L. Cheatham, Daniel P. Davis, Michael DeVita, James Downar, Dana Edelson, Alison Fox-Robichaud, Shigeki Fujitani, Raeann M. Fuller, Helen Haskell, Ma
    Critical Care Medicine.2024; 52(2): 314.     CrossRef
  • Rapid Response Systems
    Bradford D. Winters
    Critical Care Clinics.2024; 40(3): 583.     CrossRef
  • Improving sepsis recognition and management
    Merrilee I Cox, Hillary Voss
    Current Problems in Pediatric and Adolescent Health Care.2021; 51(4): 101001.     CrossRef
  • A Somogy Megyei Kaposi Mór Oktató Kórház által bevezetett gyors reagálású rendszer hatása a kórházi mortalitásra
    János Fogas, Rita Koroseczné Pavlin, Krisztina Szabó, Eszter Héra, Imre Repa, Mariann Moizs
    Orvosi Hetilap.2021; 162(20): 782.     CrossRef
  • Evidence revealed the effects of rapid response system
    Jae Hwa Cho
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(4): 282.     CrossRef
Erratum
Cardiology
Application of sepsis-3 criteria to Korean patients with critical illnesses
Jae Yeol Kim, Hwan Il Kim, Gee Young Suh, Sang Won Yoon, Tae-Yop Kim, Sang Haak Lee, Jae Young Moon, Jae-Young Kwon, Sungwon Na, Ho Geol Ryu, Jisook Park, Younsuck Koh
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(2):172-172.   Published online April 2, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00318.e1
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2019;34(1):30
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PDF
Original Articles
Infection
Application of Sepsis-3 Criteria to Korean Patients with Critical Illnesses
Jae Yeol Kim, Hwan Il Kim, Gee Young Suh, Sang Won Yoon, Tae-Yop Kim, Sang Haak Lee, Jae Young Moon, Jae-Young Kwon, Sungwon Na, Ho Geol Ryu, Jisook Park, Younsuck Koh
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):30-37.   Published online January 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00318
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2019;34(2):172
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The 2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM)/European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) task force for Sepsis-3 devised new definitions for sepsis, sepsis with organ dysfunction and septic shock. Although Sepsis-3 was data-driven, evidence-based approach, East Asian descents comprised minor portions of the project population. Methods: We selected Korean participants from the fever and antipyretics in critically ill patients evaluation (FACE) study, a joint study between Korea and Japan. We calculated the concordance rates for sepsis diagnosis between Sepsis-2 and Sepsis-3 criteria and evaluated mortality rates of sepsis, sepsis with organ dysfunction, and septic shock by Sepsis-3 criteria using the selected data. Results: Korean participants of the FACE study were 913 (383 with sepsis and 530 without sepsis by Sepsis-2 criteria). The concordance rate for sepsis diagnosis between Sepsis-2 and Sepsis-3 criteria was 55.4%. The intensive care unit (ICU) and 28-day mortality rates of sepsis, sepsis with organ dysfunction, and septic shock patients according to Sepsis-3 criteria were 26.2% and 31.0%, 27.5% and 32.5%, and 40.8% and 43.4%, respectively. The quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) was inferior not only to SOFA but also to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) for predicting ICU and 28-day mortality. Conclusions: The concordance rates for sepsis diagnosis between Sepsis-2 and Sepsis-3 criteria were low. Mortality rate for septic shock in Koreans was consistent with estimates made by the 2016 SCCM/ESICM task force. SOFA and SIRS were better than qSOFA for predicting ICU and 28-day mortality in Korean ICU patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • HYPOTENSION AT THE TIME OF SEPSIS RECOGNITION IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED MORTALITY IN SEPSIS PATIENTS WITH NORMAL LACTATE LEVELS
    Ji Hwan Kim, Yong Kyun Kim, Dong Kyu Oh, Kyeongman Jeon, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Gee Young Suh, Sung Yun Lim, Yeon Joo Lee, Young-Jae Cho, Mi-Hyeon Park, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Sunghoon Park
    Shock.2023; 59(3): 360.     CrossRef
  • The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: research priorities for the administration, epidemiology, scoring and identification of sepsis
    Mark E. Nunnally, Ricard Ferrer, Greg S. Martin, Ignacio Martin-Loeches, Flavia R. Machado, Daniel De Backer, Craig M. Coopersmith, Clifford S. Deutschman, Massimo Antonelli, Judith Hellman, Sameer Jog, Jozef Kesecioglu, Ishaq Lat, Mitchell M. Levy
    Intensive Care Medicine Experimental.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Infection
Sepsis in Patients Receiving Immunosuppressive Drugs in Korea: Analysis of the National Insurance Database from 2009 to 2013
Seung-Young Oh, Songhee Cho, Hannah Lee, Eun Jin Chang, Se Hee Min, Ho Geol Ryu
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2015;30(4):249-257.   Published online November 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2015.30.4.249
  • 7,780 View
  • 181 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of immunosuppressants on in-hospital mortality from sepsis.
Methods
Using data of the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service, we collected data from patients who were admitted to the hospital due to sepsis from 2009 to 2013. Based on drugs commonly used for immunosuppression caused by various diseases, patients were divided into three groups; immunosuppressant group, steroid-only group, and control group. Patients with no history of immunosuppressants or steroids were assigned to the control group. To identify risk factors of in-hospital mortality in sepsis, we compared differences in patient characteristics, comorbidities, intensive care unit (ICU) care requirements, and immunodeficiency profiles. Subgroup analysis according to age was also performed.
Results
Of the 185,671 included patients, 13,935 (7.5%) were in the steroid-only group and 2,771 patients (1.5%) were in the immunosuppressant group. The overall in-hospital mortality was 38.9% and showed an increasing trend with age. The steroid-only group showed the lowest in-hospital mortality among the three groups except the patients younger than 30 years. The steroid-only group and immunosuppressant group received ICU treatment more frequently (p < 0.001), stayed longer in the hospital (p < 0.001), and showed higher medical expenditure (p < 0.001) compared to the normal group. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that age, male gender, comorbidities (especially malignancy), and ICU treatment had a significant effect on in-hospital mortality.
Conclusions
Despite longer hospital length of stay and more frequent need for ICU care, the in-hospital mortality was lower in patients taking immunosuppressive drugs than in patients not taking immunosuppressive drugs.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predictive performance of NEWS and qSOFA in immunocompromised sepsis patients at the emergency department
    Lisanne Boekhoud, Helena M. E. A. Schaap, Rick L. Huizinga, Tycho J. Olgers, Jan C. ter Maaten, Douwe F. Postma, Hjalmar R. Bouma
    Infection.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ji-young Son, Won Gun Kwack, Eun Kyoung Chung, Sooyoung Shin, Yeo Jin Choi
    Healthcare.2022; 10(7): 1247.     CrossRef
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    Gayoung Kim, Kyeong-Hun Choi, Hangeun Kim, Dae-Kyun Chung
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(11): 5921.     CrossRef
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    Kwangha Lee
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    Jun Kwon Cha, In-Ae Song
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2017; 32(4): 376.     CrossRef
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    Kwangha Lee
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2015; 30(4): 239.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Chylopericardial Tamponade in a Patient with Chylothorax after Pulmonary Lobectomy
Jin Sue Jeon, Ho Geol Ryu, Hannah Lee, Da Hye Yoo
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2013;28(4):327-330.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2013.28.4.327
  • 2,940 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Chylopericardium is a very rare, yet potentially fatal, complication following intrathoracic surgery, and can further lead to other life-threatening complications such as cardiac tamponade. A 54-year-old female underwent right upper lobectomy for lung cancer. Chylothorax developed on the 2nd postoperative day, and was managed conservatively with dietary modification. On the 9th postoperative day, the patient suddenly developed hypotension and severe cardiac dysfunction requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation followed by VA ECMO. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a large amount of pericardial effusion. Prompt pericardiocentesis was performed and the aspirated fluid showed features of chyle. Thoracic duct ligation with pericardial window operation was performed because the daily amount of chyle drained did not decrease after 3 weeks. Here, we review etiologies and therapeutic options of chylopericardial tamponade following intrathoracic surgery, which should not be underestimated even when the patient seems to demonstrate a good recovery.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Case of Chylopericardium Caused by Chylous Pleural Effusion Inflow from a Damaged Pericardium during Operation for Right Lung Cancer
    Masahiro MATSUNO, Kyo HIRAYAMA, Nobuo TSUNOOKA
    Nihon Rinsho Geka Gakkai Zasshi (Journal of Japan Surgical Association).2023; 84(6): 868.     CrossRef
  • A case of cardiac tamponade caused by chylopericardium after mediastinal lymph node dissection for recurrence of lung cancer
    Shinsuke Kitazawa, Kojiro Nakaoka, Naohiro Kobayashi, Shinji Kikuchi, Yukinobu Goto, Yukio Sato
    The Journal of the Japanese Association for Chest Surgery.2017; 31(2): 181.     CrossRef
  • Isolated Chylopericardium after Mitral Valve Replacement: the First Description of Adult Heart Disease in Korea
    Su Wan Kim, Seogjae Lee
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2014; 29(2): 123.     CrossRef
Management of Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis with a Superior Vena Cava Filter - A Case Report -
Wooil Kwon, Ho Geol Ryu, Hannah Lee, Yongjae Yoo
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2013;28(1):59-63.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2013.28.1.59
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) is relatively uncommon and superior vena cava (SVC) filter placements are not often encountered due to strict indication. A 33-year old male with underlying protein C/S deficiency and secondary liver cirrhosis was admitted because of hematemesis. The patient was conservatively managed, but underwent elective splenectomy to prevent aggravation of gastric varix. During postoperative care, the patient underwent cholecystectomy for acalculous cholecystitis. During the postoperative course, UEDVT was detected and heparinization was initiated. The patient experienced repeated attacks of severe dyspnea, which was accompanied by chest pain that lasted for 3 to 10 minutes. Repeated episodes of pulmonary thromboembolism were suspected and SVC filter was placed. Warfarin treatment was initiated and the SVC filter was removed about one month later. The case highlights the clinical significance of UEDVT and reports rare case of SVC filter placement. Intensivists should have comprehensive understanding of UEDVT and its management.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care