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7 "Byung Kook Lee"
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CPR/Resuscitation
Association between C-reactive protein-to-albumin ratio and 6-month mortality in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Hui Hwan Kim, Ji Ho Lee, Dong Hun Lee, Byung Kook Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):601-609.   Published online August 18, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00542
  • 1,145 View
  • 92 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
The inflammatory response that occurs following cardiac arrest can determine the long-term prognosis of patients who survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We evaluated the correlation between C-reactive protein-to-albumin ratio (CAR) following cardiac arrest and long-term mortality. Methods: The current retrospective observational study examined patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) treated with targeted temperature management at a single tertiary care hospital. We measured CAR at four time points (at admission and then 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after) following cardiac arrest. The primary outcome was the patients’ 6-month mortality. We performed multivariable and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analyses to investigate the relationship between CAR and 6-month mortality. Results: Among the 115 patients, 52 (44.1%) died within 6 months. In the multivariable analysis, CAR at 48 hours (odds ratio [OR], 1.130; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.027–1.244) and 72 hours (OR, 1.241; 95% CI, 1.059–1.455) after cardiac arrest was independently associated with 6-month mortality. The AUCs of CAR at admission and 24, 48, and 72 hours after cardiac arrest for predicting 6-month mortality were 0.583 (95% CI, 0.489–0.673), 0.622 (95% CI, 0.528–0.710), 0.706 (95% CI, 0.615–0.786), and 0.762 (95% CI, 0.675–0.835), respectively. Conclusions: CAR at 72 hours after cardiac arrest was an independent predictor for long-term mortality in patients with PCAS.
CPR/Resuscitation
Is two-dimensional echocardiography better than electrocardiography for predicting patient outcomes after cardiac arrest?
Dong Ki Kim, Yong Soo Cho, Joochan Kim, Byung Kook Lee, Dong Hun Lee, Eujene Jung, Jeong Mi Moon, Byeong Jo Chun
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(1):37-45.   Published online December 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00773
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  • 148 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Coronary artery stenosis increases hospital mortality and leads to poor neurological recovery in cardiac arrest (CA) patients. However, electrocardiography (ECG) cannot fully predict the presence of coronary artery stenosis in CA patients. Hence, we aimed to determine whether regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA), as observed by two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE), predicted patient survival outcomes with greater accuracy than did ST segment elevation (STE) on ECG in CA patients who underwent coronary angiography (CAG) after return of spontaneous circulation.
Methods
This was a retrospective observational study of adult patients with CA of presumed cardiac etiology who underwent CAG at a single tertiary care hospital. We investigated whether RWMA observed on 2DE predicted patient outcomes more accurately than did STE observed on ECG. The primary outcome was incidence of hospital mortality. The secondary outcomes were Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Category scores measured 6 months after discharge and significant coronary artery stenosis on CAG.
Results
Among the 145 patients, 36 (24.8%) experienced in-hospital death. In multivariable analysis of survival outcomes, only total arrest time (P=0.011) and STE (P=0.035) were significant. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI), which were obtained by adjusting the total arrest time for survival outcomes, were significant only for STE (OR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.17–0.94). The presence of RWMA was not a significant factor.
Conclusions
While STE predicted survival outcomes in adult CA patients, RWMA did not. The decision to perform CAG after CA should include ECG under existing guidelines. The use of RWMA has limited benefits in treatment of this population.
Trauma
The association between the initial lactate level and need for massive transfusion in severe trauma patients with and without traumatic brain injury
Young Hoon Park, Dong Hyun Ryu, Byung Kook Lee, Dong Hun Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(4):255-262.   Published online November 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00640
  • 3,954 View
  • 123 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Exsanguination is a major cause of death in severe trauma patients. The purpose of this study was to analyze the prognostic impact of the initial lactate level for massive transfusion (MT) in severe trauma. We divided patients according to subgroups of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and non-TBI.
Methods
This single-institution retrospective study was conducted on patients who were admitted to hospital for severe trauma between January 2016 and December 2017. TBI was defined by a head Abbreviated Injury Scale ≥3. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to analyze the prognostic impact of the lactate level. Multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between the MT and lactate level. The primary outcome was MT.
Results
Of the 553 patients, MT was performed in 62 patients (11.2%). The area under the curve (AUC) for the lactate level for predicting MT was 0.779 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.742 to 0.813). The AUCs for lactate level in the TBI and non-TBI patients were 0.690 (95% CI, 0.627 to 0.747) and 0.842 (95% CI, 0.796 to 0.881), respectively. In multivariate analyses, the lactate level was independently associated with the MT (odds ratio [OR], 1.179; 95% CI, 1.070 to 1.299). The lactate level was independently associated with MT in non-TBI patients (OR, 1.469; 95% CI, 1.262 to 1.710), but not in TBI patients.
Conclusions
The initial lactate level may be a possible prognostic factor for MT in severe trauma. In TBI patients, however, the initial lactate level was not suitable for predicting MT.
Cardiology/Emergency
Five-year Experience of Extracorporeal Life Support in Emergency Physicians
Yong Soo Cho, Kyoung Hwan Song, Byung Kook Lee, Kyung Woon Jeung, Yong Hun Jung, Dong Hun Lee, Sung Min Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):52-59.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00885
  • 6,515 View
  • 153 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to present our 5-year experience of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) performed by emergency physicians.
Methods
We retrospectively analyzed 58 patients who underwent ECPR between January 2010 and December 2014. The primary parameter analyzed was survival to hospital discharge. The secondary parameters analyzed were neurologic outcome at hospital discharge, cannulation time, and ECPR-related complications.
Results
Thirty-one patients (53.4%) were successfully weaned from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and 18 (31.0%) survived to hospital discharge. Twelve patients (20.7%) were discharged with good neurologic outcomes. The median cannulation time was 25.0 min (interquartile range 20.0-31.0 min). Nineteen patients (32.8%) had ECPR-related complications, the most frequent being distal limb ischemia. Regarding the initial presentation, 52 patients (83.9%) collapsed due to a cardiac etiology, and acute myocardial infarction (33/62, 53.2%) was the most common cause of cardiac arrest.
Conclusions
The survival to hospital discharge rate for cardiac arrest patients who underwent ECPR conducted by an emergency physician was within the acceptable limits. The cannulation time and complications following ECPR were comparable to those found in previous studies.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation location, coronary angiography and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
    Yoonjic Kim, Jeong Ho Park, Sun Young Lee, Young Sun Ro, Ki Jeong Hong, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin
    The American Journal of Emergency Medicine.2023; 64: 142.     CrossRef
  • Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: time-dependent propensity score-sequential matching analysis from a nationwide population-based registry
    Yeongho Choi, Jeong Ho Park, Joo Jeong, Yu Jin Kim, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin
    Critical Care.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Time from arrest to extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival after out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest
    Jeong Ho Park, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin, Young Sun Ro, Ki Jeong Hong
    Emergency Medicine Australasia.2019; 31(6): 1073.     CrossRef
  • Pre-hospital extra-corporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation
    Ben Singer, Joshua C. Reynolds, David J. Lockey, Ben O’Brien
    Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Blood Gases during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Predicting Arrest Cause between Primary Cardiac Arrest and Asphyxial Arrest
Sei Jong Bae, Byung Kook Lee, Ki Tae Kim, Kyung Woon Jeung, Hyoung Youn Lee, Yong Hun Jung, Geo Sung Lee, Sun Pyo Kim, Seung Joon Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2013;28(1):33-40.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2013.28.1.33
  • 2,038 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
If acid-base status and electrolytes on blood gases during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) differ between the arrest causes, this difference may aid in differentiating the arrest cause. We sought to assess the ability of blood gases during CPR to predict the arrest cause between primary cardiac arrest and asphyxial arrest.
METHODS
A retrospective study was conducted on adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients for whom blood gas analysis was performed during CPR on emergency department arrival. Patients were divided into two groups according to the arrest cause: a primary cardiac arrest group and an asphyxial arrest group. Acid-base status and electrolytes during CPR were compared between the two groups.
RESULTS
Presumed arterial samples showed higher potassium in the asphyxial arrest group (p < 0.001). On the other hand, presumed venous samples showed higher potassium (p = 0.001) and PCO2 (p < 0.001) and lower pH (p = 0.008) and oxygen saturation (p = 0.01) in the asphyxial arrest group. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that arterial potassium (OR 5.207, 95% CI 1.430-18.964, p = 0.012) and venous PCO2 (OR 1.049, 95% CI 1.021-1.078, p < 0.001) were independent predictors of asphyxial arrest. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses indicated an optimal cut-off value for arterial potassium of 6.1 mEq/L (sensitivity 100% and specificity 86.4%) and for venous PCO2 of 70.9 mmHg (sensitivity 84.6% and specificity 65.9%).
CONCLUSIONS
The present study indicates that blood gases during CPR can be used to predict the arrest cause. These findings should be confirmed through further studies.
The Changing Pattern of Blood Glucose Levels and Its Association with In-hospital Mortality in the Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia
Ki Tae Kim, Byung Kook Lee, Hyoung Youn Lee, Geo Sung Lee, Yong Hun Jung, Kyung Woon Jeung, Hyun Ho Ryu, Byoeng Jo Chun, Jeong Mi Moon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2012;27(4):255-262.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2012.27.4.255
  • 2,493 View
  • 17 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The aim of this study was to analyze the dynamics of blood glucose during therapeutic hypothermia (TH) and the association between in-hospital mortality and blood glucose in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors (OHCA) treated with TH.
METHODS
The OHCA treated with TH between 2008 and 2011 were identified and analyzed. Blood glucose values were measured every hour during TH and collected. Mean blood glucose and standard deviation (SD) were calculated using blood glucose values during the entire TH period and during each phase of TH. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality.
RESULTS
One hundred twenty patients were analyzed. The non-shockable rhythm (OR = 8.263, 95% CI 1.622-42.094, p = 0.011) and mean glucose value during induction (OR = 1.010, 95% CI 1.003-1.016, p = 0.003) were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. The blood glucose values decreased with time, and median glucose values were 161.0 (116.0-228.0) mg/dl, 128.0 (102.0-165.0) mg/dl, and 105.0 (87.5-129.3) mg/dl during the induction, maintenance, and rewarming phase, respectively. The 241 (180-309) mg/dl of the median blood glucose value before TH was significantly lower than 183 (133-242) mg/dl of the maximal median blood glucose value during the cooling phase (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS
High blood glucose was associated with in-hospital mortality in OHCA treated with TH. Therefore, hyperglycaemia during TH should be monitored and managed. The blood glucose decreased by time during TH. However, it is unclear whether TH itself, insulin treatment or fluid resuscitation with glucose-free solutions affects hypoglycaemia.
Adequacy of Epinephrine Administration during Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support in terms of Dosing and Intervals between Doses
Seung Joon Lee, Byung Kook Lee, Kyung Woon Jeung, Hyoung Youn Lee, Tag Heo, Yong Il Min, Jong Geun Yun, Jae Hoon Lim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2011;26(2):69-77.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2011.26.2.69
  • 2,125 View
  • 25 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Consensus guidelines clearly define how epinephrine is administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In South Korea, it is not known whether epinephrine is administered in accordance with the current advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) guidelines during actual practice. We sought to investigate adherence to ACLS guidelines during actual CPR in terms of the dose of epinephrine and the interval between doses.
METHODS
A retrospective review of medical records was performed on 394 adult cardiac arrest patients who received CPR at an emergency room. Data including the duration of CPR, the dose of epinephrine, and the interval between doses was collected from CPR records.
RESULTS
Standard-dose epinephrine (1 mg) was used in 166 of 394 patients (42.1%). In 58.8% of patients, the average between-dose interval was within the 3-5 min recommended in the guidelines, whereas it was shorter than 3 min in 31.4% of patients. As a whole, epinephrine was administered in accordance with the current ACLS guidelines in only 96 of 394 patients (24.4%). Logistic regression analysis revealed the duration of CPR to be an independent factor affecting the use of standard-dose epinephrine and the adequate between-dose interval.
CONCLUSIONS
Epinephrine was not administered according to the ACLS guideline in most patients. A national multi-center study is required to determine whether the poor adherence to the ACLS guideline is a widespread problem. In addition, efforts to improve adherence to the ACLS guideline are required.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Reply to letter “Improving ROSC with high dose of epinephrine. Are we really?”
    Kyung Woon Jeung, Hyun Ho Ryu, Kyung Hwan Song, Byung Kook Lee, Hyoung Youn Lee, Tag Heo, Yong Il Min
    Resuscitation.2012; 83(3): e73.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care