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Volume 32 (1); February 2017
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Reviews
Pulmonary
Lung Ultrasound (in the Critically Ill) Superior to CT: the Example of Lung Sliding
Daniel A. Lichtenstein
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):1-8.   Published online February 14, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00955
  • 16,628 View
  • 819 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
This review article shows the potential of lung ultrasound in the critically ill (LUCI) to study lung sliding and describes the optimal equipment for its assessment. Then, it analyses the integration of lung sliding within lung ultrasound then whole body critical ultrasound. It describes the place of lung sliding in the BLUE-protocol (bedside lung ultrasound in emergency) (lung and venous ultrasound for diagnosing acute respiratory failure), the FALLS-protocol (fluid administration limited by lung sonography) (the role of lung sliding in circulatory failure), and the SESAME-protocol (sequential assessment of sonography assessing mechanism or origin of severe shock of indistinct cause) (whole body ultrasound in cardiac arrest). In the LUCIFLR project (LUCI favoring limitation of radiations), the consideration of lung sliding allows drastic reduction in irradiation and costs. In conclusion, lung sliding is proposed as a gold standard for indicating the presence of the lung at the chest wall and its correct expansion.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Early detection of delayed pneumothorax using lung ultrasound after transthoracic needle lung biopsy: A prospective pilot study
    Jeong Suk Koh, Chaeuk Chung, Ju Ock Kim, Sung Soo Jung, Hee Sun Park, Jeong Eun Lee, Da Hyun Kang, Yoonjoo Kim, Dongil Park
    The Clinical Respiratory Journal.2022; 16(5): 413.     CrossRef
  • Usefulness of Lung Ultrasound Follow‐up in Patients Who Have Recovered From Coronavirus Disease 2019
    Yale Tung‐Chen, Milagros Martí de Gracia, Maria Luz Parra‐Gordo, Aurea Díez‐Tascón, Sergio Agudo‐Fernández, Silvia Ossaba‐Vélez
    Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine.2021; 40(9): 1971.     CrossRef
  • The role of lung ultrasound in COVID-19 disease
    Dirk-André Clevert, Paul S. Sidhu, Adrian Lim, Caroline Ewertsen, Vladimir Mitkov, Maciej Piskunowicz, Paolo Ricci, Núria Bargallo, Adrian P. Brady
    Insights into Imaging.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Acute Care Nephrology
    Nithin Karakala, Daniel Córdoba, Kiran Chandrashekar, Arnaldo Lopez-Ruiz, Luis A. Juncos
    Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease.2021; 28(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • YEARS Algorithm Versus Wells’ Score
    Ahmed Abdelaal Ahmed Mahmoud M. Alkhatip, Maria Donnelly, Lindi Snyman, Patrick Conroy, Mohamed Khaled Hamza, Ian Murphy, Andrew Purcell, David McGuire
    Critical Care Medicine.2020; 48(5): 704.     CrossRef
  • Sonographische Bildgebung der Lunge bei COVID-19
    M. Schmid, F. Escher, D.-A. Clevert
    Der Radiologe.2020; 60(10): 919.     CrossRef
  • Current Misconceptions in Lung Ultrasound
    Daniel A. Lichtenstein
    Chest.2019; 156(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • Role of thoracic ultrasound in children with chronic kidney disease
    SaneyaAbd El-Halim Fahmy, NaglaaAbd El-Moneam Abd Allah, AmiraI Al-Masry, Eman Sobh
    The Scientific Journal of Al-Azhar Medical Faculty, Girls.2019; 3(3): 693.     CrossRef
  • Novel approaches to ultrasonography of the lung and pleural space: where are we now?
    Daniel Lichtenstein
    Breathe.2017; 13(2): 100.     CrossRef
Surgery
Management of Critical Burn Injuries: Recent Developments
David J. Dries, John J. Marini
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):9-21.   Published online February 17, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00969
  • 24,425 View
  • 1,514 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Burn injury and its subsequent multisystem effects are commonly encountered by acute care practitioners. Resuscitation is the major component of initial burn care and must be managed to restore and preserve vital organ function. Later complications of burn injury are dominated by infection. Burn centers are often called to manage problems related to thermal injury, including lightning and electrical injuries.
Methods
A selected review is provided of key management concepts as well as of recent reports published by the American Burn Association.
Results
The burn-injured patient is easily and frequently over resuscitated, with ensuing complications that include delayed wound healing and respiratory compromise. A feedback protocol designed to limit the occurrence of excessive resuscitation has been proposed, but no new “gold standard” for resuscitation has replaced the venerated Parkland formula. While new medical therapies have been proposed for patients sustaining inhalation injury, a paradigm-shifting standard of medical therapy has not emerged. Renal failure as a specific contributor to adverse outcome in burns has been reinforced by recent data. Of special problems addressed in burn centers, electrical injuries pose multisystem physiologic challenges and do not fit typical scoring systems.
Conclusion
Recent reports emphasize the dangers of over resuscitation in the setting of burn injury. No new medical therapy for inhalation injury has been generally adopted, but new standards for description of burn-related infections have been presented. The value of the burn center in care of the problems of electrical exposure, both manmade and natural, is demonstrated in recent reports.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • SUBMICROSCOPIC CHANGES IN THE HEMOCAPILLARIES OF THE CEREBRAL HEMISCLE CAUSES CAUSED BY THERMAL BURN
    H. V. Lukyantseva, V. A. Pastukhova, O. I. Kovalchuk
    Bulletin of Problems Biology and Medicine.2021; 3(1): 268.     CrossRef
  • Kefir Accelerates Burn Wound Healing Through Inducing Fibroblast Cell Migration In Vitro and Modulating the Expression of IL-1ß, TGF-ß1, and bFGF Genes In Vivo
    Ahmad Oryan, Esmat Alemzadeh, Mohammad Hadi Eskandari
    Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins.2019; 11(3): 874.     CrossRef
  • Viable placental allograft as a biological dressing in the clinical management of full-thickness thermal occupational burns
    Eric L. Johnson, Elisabet K. Tassis, Georgina M. Michael, Susan G. Whittinghill
    Medicine.2017; 96(49): e9045.     CrossRef
Cardiology
Blood Transfusion Strategies in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Hyoung Soo Kim, Sunghoon Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):22-28.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00983
  • 18,785 View
  • 674 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is frequently associated with bleeding and coagulopathy complications, which may lead to the need for transfusion of multiple blood products. However, blood transfusions are known to increase morbidity and mortality, as well as hospital cost, in critically ill patients. In current practice, patients on ECMO receive a transfusion, on average, of 1-5 packed red blood cells (RBCs)/day, with platelet transfusion accounting for the largest portion of transfusion volume. Generally, adult patients require more transfusions than neonates or children, and patients receiving venovenous ECMO for respiratory failure tend to need smaller transfusion volumes compared to those receiving venoarterial ECMO for cardiac failure. Observation studies have reported that a higher transfusion volume was associated with increased mortality. To date, the evidence for transfusion in patients undergoing ECMO is limited; most knowledge on transfusion strategies was extrapolated from studies in critically ill patients. However, current data support a restrictive blood transfusion strategy for ECMO patients, and a low transfusion trigger seems to be safe and reasonable.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation without allogeneic blood transfusion: An observational cohort study
    Alison Grazioli, Michael Plazak, Siamak Dahi, Joseph Rabin, Ashley Menne, Mehrdad Ghoreishi, Bradley Taylor, Seth Perelman, Michael Mazzeffi
    Perfusion.2022; : 026765912211190.     CrossRef
  • A value-based approach to optimize red blood cell transfusion in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Yasuhiro Shudo, Nathalie Cheng, Hao He, Corinne Rosenberg, William Hiesinger, Eric Hadhazy, John Shepard, Purnima Krishna, Josh Resnik, Robyn Fong, Charles Hill, Joe L Hsu, Paul M Maggio, Sang-Ick Chang, Jack H Boyd, Y Joseph Woo
    Perfusion.2022; : 026765912211281.     CrossRef
  • Neonatal extra corporeal membrane oxygenation
    Suneel Kumar Pooboni
    Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.2021; 37(4): 411.     CrossRef
  • Point-of-care testing of plasma free hemoglobin and hematocrit for mechanical circulatory support
    Dong Ah Shin, Jung Chan Lee, Heean Shin, Young-Jae Cho, Hee Chan Kim
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Systematic review and meta-analysis of the clinical effectiveness of point-of-care testing for anticoagulation management during ECMO
    Federica Jiritano, Dario Fina, Roberto Lorusso, Hugo ten Cate, Mariusz Kowalewski, Matteo Matteucci, Raffaele Serra, Pasquale Mastroroberto, Giuseppe Filiberto Serraino
    Journal of Clinical Anesthesia.2021; 73: 110330.     CrossRef
  • Blood transfusion strategies and ECMO during the COVID-19 pandemic
    David Koeckerling, Daniel Pan, N Lakmal Mudalige, Oluwatobiloba Oyefeso, Joseph Barker
    The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.2020; 8(5): e40.     CrossRef
  • Life-threatening antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated vasculitis after influenza A H1N1 infection requiring veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Frantzeska G. Frantzeskaki, Stavros Dimopoulos, Dimitrios Konstantonis, Pelagia Katsibri, Kostantinos Kostopanagiotou, Maria Theodorakopoulou, Chrysi Diakaki, Dimitrios Dougenis, Dimitrios Boumpas, Andreas Karabinis, Apostolos Armaganidis, Iraklis Tsangar
    Perfusion.2020; 35(6): 546.     CrossRef
  • Case Report: Successful Use of Extracorporeal Therapies After ECMO Resuscitation in a Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipient
    Andrey Rybalko, Anna Pytal, Mikhail Kaabak, Nadejda Rappoport, Anuar Bidzhiev, Vasilii Lastovka
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Infection
Outbreak of Imipenemase-1-Producing Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in an Intensive Care Unit
Jin Young Lee, Ji Young Park, Je Hun Kim, Young Hee Lee, Hee Young Yang, Jung Sik Yoo
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):29-38.   Published online December 29, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00731
  • 9,547 View
  • 205 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) with acquired metallo β-lactamase (MBL) resistance have been increasingly reported worldwide and associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Here, an outbreak of genetically related strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing the imipenemase (IMP)-1 MBL in a medical intensive care unit (MICU) in Korea is reported.
Methods
Since isolating carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae (CRKP) at the MICU of the hospital on August 10, 2011, surveillance cultures for CRE in 31 hospitalized patients were performed from August to September 2011. Carbapenem resistance was determined based on the disk diffusion method outlined in the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for genes coding for β-lactamase. Associations among isolates were assessed via pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In addition, a surveillance study of environmental cultures and health-care workers (HCWs) was conducted in the MICU during the same time frame.
Results
During the study period, non-duplicated CRKP specimens were discovered in four patients in the MICU, suggestive of an outbreak. On August 10, 2011, CRKP was isolated from the sputum of a 79-year-old male patient who was admitted to the MICU. A surveillance study to detect additional CRE carriers by rectal swab revealed an additional three CRKP isolates. PCR and sequencing of the four isolates identified the presence of the IMP-1 gene. In addition, PFGE showed that the four isolated strains were genetically related. CRE was not identified in specimens taken from the hands of HCWs or other environmental sources during surveillance following the outbreak. Transmission of the carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae strain was controlled by isolation of the patients and strict contact precautions.
Conclusions
This study shows that rapid and systemic detection of CRE and strict infection controls are important steps in preventing nosocomial transmission.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Genotypic Distribution and Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Isolated From Rectal and Clinical Samples in Korean University Hospitals Between 2016 and 2019
    Seri Jeong, Nuri Lee, Min-Jeong Park, Kibum Jeon, Han-Sung Kim, Hyun Soo Kim, Jae-Seok Kim, Wonkeun Song
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2022; 42(1): 36.     CrossRef
  • Characterization of Infections with Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) and Staphylococcus aureus with Reduced Vancomycin Susceptibility in South Korea
    Jung Wan Park, Hyungmin Lee, Jung Wook Kim, Bongyoung Kim
    Scientific Reports.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pharmacology
Comparing the Rates of Dopamine Hemodynamic Effect Onset after Infusion through Peripheral Veins in Three Regions
Deokkyu Kim, Ji-Seon Son, Won-Young Choi, Young-Jin Han, Jun-Rae Lee, Hyungsun Lim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):39-46.   Published online January 24, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00808
  • 5,582 View
  • 109 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Dopamine is an inotropic agent that is often selected for continuous infusion. For hemodynamic stability, the rate of infusion is controlled in the range of 5-15 μg/kg/min. This study aimed to compare the time intervals from the administration of dopamine to the onset of its hemodynamic effects when dopamine was administered through three different peripheral veins (the cephalic vein [CV], the great saphenous vein [GSV], and the external jugular vein [EJV]).
Methods
Patients in group 1, group 2, and group 3 received dopamine infusions in the CV, GSV, and EJV, respectively. A noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitor (NICCOMO™, Medis, Ilmenau, Germany) was used to assess cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR). Six minutes after intubation, baseline heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), CO, and SVR values were recorded and dopamine infusion was initiated at a dose of 10 μg/kg/min. Hemodynamic changes at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 15 minutes postinfusion were recorded.
Results
No statistically significant differences were observed among the three groups with respect to the rate of hemodynamic change. In all groups, systolic BP, diastolic BP, MAP, and SVR tended to increase after decreasing for the first 4 minutes; in contrast, HR and CO decreased until 8 minutes, after which they tended to reach a plateau.
Conclusions
For patients under general anesthesia receiving dopamine at 10 μg/kg/min, there were no clinical differences in the effect of dopamine administered through three different peripheral veins.
Quality Improvement
Early Experience of Medical Alert System in a Rural Training Hospital: a Pilot Study
Maru Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):47-51.   Published online December 23, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00598
  • 6,016 View
  • 112 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Medical emergency teams (METs) have shown their merit in preventing unexpected cardiac arrest. However, it might be impractical for small- or medium-sized hospitals to operate an MET due to limited manpower and resources. In this study, we sought to evaluate the feasibility of a medical alert system (MAS) that alerts all doctors involved in patient care of patient deterioration via text message using smart-phones. Methods: The MAS was test-operated from July 2015 to September 2015, in five general wards with a high incidence of cardiac arrest. The number of cardiac arrests was compared to that of 2014. The indication for activation of MAS was decided by the intensive care unit committee of the institution, which examined previous reports on MET. Results: During the three-month study period, 2,322 patients were admitted to the participating wards. In all, MAS activation occurred in 9 patients (0.39%). After activation, 7 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. Two patients (0.09%) experienced cardiac arrest. Of 13,129 patients admitted to the ward in 2014, there were 50 cases (0.38%) of cardiac arrest (p = 0.009). Conclusions: It is feasible to use MAS to prevent unexpected cardiac arrest in a general ward.
Cardiology/Emergency
Five-year Experience of Extracorporeal Life Support in Emergency Physicians
Yong Soo Cho, Kyoung Hwan Song, Byung Kook Lee, Kyung Woon Jeung, Yong Hun Jung, Dong Hun Lee, Sung Min Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):52-59.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00885
  • 6,274 View
  • 152 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study aimed to present our 5-year experience of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) performed by emergency physicians.
Methods
We retrospectively analyzed 58 patients who underwent ECPR between January 2010 and December 2014. The primary parameter analyzed was survival to hospital discharge. The secondary parameters analyzed were neurologic outcome at hospital discharge, cannulation time, and ECPR-related complications.
Results
Thirty-one patients (53.4%) were successfully weaned from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and 18 (31.0%) survived to hospital discharge. Twelve patients (20.7%) were discharged with good neurologic outcomes. The median cannulation time was 25.0 min (interquartile range 20.0-31.0 min). Nineteen patients (32.8%) had ECPR-related complications, the most frequent being distal limb ischemia. Regarding the initial presentation, 52 patients (83.9%) collapsed due to a cardiac etiology, and acute myocardial infarction (33/62, 53.2%) was the most common cause of cardiac arrest.
Conclusions
The survival to hospital discharge rate for cardiac arrest patients who underwent ECPR conducted by an emergency physician was within the acceptable limits. The cannulation time and complications following ECPR were comparable to those found in previous studies.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation location, coronary angiography and survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
    Yoonjic Kim, Jeong Ho Park, Sun Young Lee, Young Sun Ro, Ki Jeong Hong, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin
    The American Journal of Emergency Medicine.2023; 64: 142.     CrossRef
  • Time from arrest to extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation and survival after out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest
    Jeong Ho Park, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin, Young Sun Ro, Ki Jeong Hong
    Emergency Medicine Australasia.2019; 31(6): 1073.     CrossRef
  • Pre-hospital extra-corporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation
    Ben Singer, Joshua C. Reynolds, David J. Lockey, Ben O’Brien
    Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Nursing/Quality Improvement
Transcultural Adaptation and Validation of the Family Satisfaction in the Intensive Care Unit Questionnaire in a Korean Sample
Youlim Kim, Jinsoo Min, Gajin Lim, Jung-Kyu Lee, Hannah Lee, Jinwoo Lee, Kyung Su Kim, Jong Sun Park, Young-Jae Cho, You Hwan Jo, Hogeol Rhu, Kyu-seok Kim, Sang-Min Lee, Yeon Joo Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):60-69.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00962
  • 7,039 View
  • 208 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
A number of questionnaires designed for analyzing family members’ inconvenience and demands in intensive care unit (ICU) care have been developed and validated in North America. The family satisfaction in the intensive care Unit-24 (FS-ICU-24) questionnaire is one of the most widely used of these instruments. This study aimed to translate the FS-ICU-24 questionnaire into Korean and validate the Korean version of the questionnaire.
Methods
The study was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency ICUs at three tertiary hospitals. Relatives of all patients hospitalized for at least 48 hours were enrolled for this study participants. The validation process included the measurement of construct validity, internal consistency, and interrater reliability. The questionnaire consists of 24 items divided between two subscales: satisfaction with care (14 items) and satisfaction with decision making (10 items).
Results
In total, 200 family members of 176 patients from three hospitals completed the FS-ICU-24 questionnaire. Construct validity for the questionnaire was superior to that observed for a visual analog scale (Spearman’s r = 0.84, p < 0.001). Cronbach’s αs were 0.83 and 0.80 for the satisfaction with care and satisfaction with decision making subscales, respectively. The mean (± standard deviation) total FS-ICU-24 score was 75.44 ± 17.70, and participants were most satisfied with consideration of their needs (82.13 ± 21.03) and least satisfied with the atmosphere in the ICU waiting room (35.38 ± 34.84).
Conclusions
The Korean version of the FS-ICU-24 questionnaire demonstrated good validity and could be a useful instrument with which to measure family members’ satisfaction about ICU care.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Effect of a Multifaceted Family Participation Program in an Adult Cardiovascular Surgery ICU*
    Hye Jin Yoo, JaeLan Shim
    Critical Care Medicine.2021; 49(1): 38.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric validation of the Chinese patient- and family satisfaction in the intensive care unit questionnaires
    Veronica Ka Wai Lai, Johnson Ching-Hong Li, Anna Lee
    Journal of Critical Care.2019; 54: 58.     CrossRef
  • Survey of family satisfaction with intensive care units
    Jinsoo Min, Youlim Kim, Jung-Kyu Lee, Hannah Lee, Jinwoo Lee, Kyung Su Kim, Young-Jae Cho, You Hwan Jo, Ho Geol Ryu, Kyuseok Kim, Sang-Min Lee, Yeon Joo Lee
    Medicine.2018; 97(32): e11809.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Pulmonary
A Reinforced Endotracheal Tube Completely Severed by a Patient Bite and Lodged in the Right Main Bronchus
Susie Yoon, Hyunjung Choo, Se Eun Kim, Heeyeon Kwon, Hannah Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):70-73.   Published online November 14, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00437
  • 9,281 View
  • 142 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Reinforced endotracheal tubes (ETTs) are designed to resist kinking or compression. However, these have a potential risk of being obstructed or severed by a patient’s bite. We report a case in which a reinforced ETT was severed by tube-bite while the patient was in the prone position during an intensive care unit stay. Bronchoscopic evaluation showed that the severed distal part of the tube had lodged in the patient’s right main bronchus, and it had to be surgically removed. The patency of reinforced ETTs should be carefully monitored in patients intubated in the prone position.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Anaesthesia for reconstructive free flap surgery for head and neck cancer
    Peter McCauley, Michael Moore, Edel Duggan
    British Journal of Hospital Medicine.2022; 83(5): 1.     CrossRef
  • Endotracheal Tube Obstruction Among Patients Mechanically Ventilated for ARDS Due to COVID-19: A Case Series
    Samuel Wiles, Eduardo Mireles-Cabodevila, Scott Neuhofs, Sanjay Mukhopadhyay, Jordan P. Reynolds, Umur Hatipoğlu
    Journal of Intensive Care Medicine.2021; 36(5): 604.     CrossRef
  • Complete Endotracheal Tube Transection by Patient Bite: A Case Report and Algorithm for Fragment Identification and Extraction
    Annette Ilg, Matthias Eikermann, Andrew J. Synn
    A&A Practice.2021; 15(3): e01428.     CrossRef
  • Importance of Capnography Monitoring in Critical Ill Patients
    Young-Kown Ko
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2017; 32(1): 79.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Recurrent Aspiration Pneumonia due to Anterior Cervical Osteophyte
Jae Jun Lee, Ji Young Hong, Jun Han Jung, Jun Hyeok Yang, Jun-Young Sohn
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):74-78.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00409
  • 7,952 View
  • 112 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
A 74-year-old man presented with recurrent vomiting and aspiration pneumonia in the left lower lobe. He entered the intensive care unit to manage the pneumonia and septic shock. Although a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube was implanted for recurrent vomiting, vomiting and aspiration recurred frequently during admission. Subsequently, he complained of neck pain when in an upright position. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study showed compression of the esophagus by cervical osteophytes and tracheal aspiration caused by an abnormality at the laryngeal inlet. Cervical spine X-rays and computed tomography showed anterior cervical osteophytes at the C3-6 levels. Surgical decompression was scheduled, but was cancelled due to his frailty. Unfortunately, further recurrent vomiting and aspiration resulted in respiratory arrest leading to hypoxic brain damage and death. Physicians should consider cervical spine disease, such as diffuse skeletal hyperostosis as an uncommon cause of recurrent aspiration pneumonia.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis of the cervical spine causing dysphagia and airway obstruction: an updated systematic review
    Netanja I. Harlianto, Jonneke S. Kuperus, Firdaus A.A. Mohamed Hoesein, Pim A. de Jong, Jacob A. de Ru, F. Cumhur Öner, Jorrit-Jan Verlaan
    The Spine Journal.2022; 22(9): 1490.     CrossRef
  • An unusual presentation of thoracic diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)
    Suthipas Pongmanee, Borvornsake Rojdumrongrattana, Noparoot Kritworakarn, Peem Sarasombath, Wongthawat Liawrungrueang
    International Journal of Surgery Case Reports.2022; 93: 106993.     CrossRef
Editorial
Pulmonary
Importance of Capnography Monitoring in Critical Ill Patients
Young-Kown Ko
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):79-80.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00101
  • 5,960 View
  • 181 Download
PDF
Letters to the Editor
Neurology/Obstetric
Myotonic Dystrophy Confirmed after Cesarean Section
Seung Hyun Kim, Jeongmin Kim, Taehoon Ha, Sungwon Na
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):81-82.   Published online February 17, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00864
  • 4,712 View
  • 100 Download
PDF
Pulmonary
Experiences Using Airway Pressure Release Ventilation for Pneumonia with Severe Hypercapnia or Postoperative Pulmonary Edema
Kyung Sook Hong, Young-Joo Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):83-87.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00906
  • 5,300 View
  • 134 Download
PDF
Erratum
Cardiology
Erratum: Moderate to Severe Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Related to Short-term Mortality of Patients with Post-cardiac Arrest Syndrome after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Kyoung Jeen Min, Jin Joo Kim, In Cheol Hwang, Jae Hyuk Woo, Yong Su Lim, Hyuk Jun Yang, Keun Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):88-88.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00570.e01
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2016;31(4):342
  • 4,048 View
  • 60 Download
  • 1 Citations
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality after Recovered Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Proven Significant Coronary Artery Disease: A Retrospective Study
    Maria Trepa, Samuel Bastos, Marta Fontes-Oliveira, Ricardo Costa, André Dias-Frias, André Luz, Vasco Dias, Mário Santos, Severo Torres
    The Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2020; 6(1): 41.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care