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Ji Ye Jung 5 Articles
Cardiology
Predictors and outcomes of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy in critically ill patients
Myung Jin Song, Sang Hoon Lee, Ah Young Leem, Song Yee Kim, Kyung Soo Chung, Eun Young Kim, Ji Ye Jung, Young Ae Kang, Young Sam Kim, Joon Chang, Moo Suk Park
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(2):67-76.   Published online May 15, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00024
  • 6,974 View
  • 222 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC) occurs frequently in critically ill patients, but the clinical features and prognostic impact of SIC on sepsis outcome remain controversial. Here, we investigated the predictors and outcomes of SIC.
Methods
Patients admitted to a single medical intensive care unit from June 2016 to September 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. SIC was diagnosed by ejection fraction (EF) <50% and ≥10% decrease in baseline EF that recovered within 2 weeks.
Results
In total, 342 patients with sepsis met the inclusion criteria, and 49 patients (14.3%) were diagnosed with SIC; the latter were compared with 259 patients whose EF was not deteriorated by sepsis (non-SIC). Low systolic blood pressure and increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) were identified as predictors of SIC. SIC and non-SIC patients did not differ significantly in terms of 28-day all-cause mortality (24.5% vs. 26.3%, P=0.936). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II; hazard ratio [HR], 1.10; 95% confidential interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.18; P=0.009) and delta neutrophil index (DNI; HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.08; P=0.026) were independent risk factors for 28-day mortality with SIC. DNI, APACHE II, and lactate were identified as risk factors for 28-day mortality in sepsis patients as a whole.
Conclusions
SIC was not associated with increased mortality compared to non-SIC. Low systolic blood pressure and increased LVEDD were predictors of SIC. High APACHE II score and elevated DNI, which reflect sepsis severity, predict 28-day all-cause mortality.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Testosterone and soluble ST2 as mortality predictive biomarkers in male patients with sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy
    Lu Wang, Wen Dai, Ruiyao Zhu, Tingting Long, Zhaocai Zhang, Zhenju Song, Sucheng Mu, Shasha Wang, Huijuan Wang, Jiaxi Lei, Jing Zhang, Wenfang Xia, Guang Li, Wenwei Gao, Handong Zou, Yan Li, Liying Zhan
    Frontiers in Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Meta-Analysis of Initial Natriuretic Peptides in the Setting of Sepsis-Induced Myocardial Dysfunction
    Boyong He, Xin Wang, Liguo Shi, Hongbin Cheng, Luyi Zhao
    Biomarkers in Medicine.2024; 18(4): 145.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Prognosis of Sepsis-Induced Cardiomyopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Daisuke Hasegawa, Yoshiko Ishisaka, Tetsuro Maeda, Narut Prasitlumkum, Kazuki Nishida, Siddharth Dugar, Ryota Sato
    Journal of Intensive Care Medicine.2023; 38(9): 797.     CrossRef
  • Research Progress on the Mechanism and Management of Septic Cardiomyopathy: A Comprehensive Review
    Xue-Bin Pei, Bo Liu, Maciej Dyrbuś
    Emergency Medicine International.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • Biomarkers to Predict Multiorgan Distress Syndrome and Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Surgical Patients
    In Sik Shin, Da Kyung Kim, Sanghyun An, Sung Chan Gong, Moo Hyun Kim, Md Habibur Rahman, Cheol-Su Kim, Joon Hyeong Sohn, Kwangmin Kim, Hoon Ryu
    Medicina.2023; 59(12): 2054.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors of postoperative septic cardiomyopathy in perioperative sepsis patients
    Yuchang Xin, Ying Ge, Liuhui Chang, Yong Ni, Hairui Liu, Jiang Zhu
    BMC Anesthesiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of milrinone versus placebo on hemodynamic in patients with septic shock: A randomize control trial
    Suratee Chobngam, Surat Tongyoo
    Clinical Critical Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Yu-Min Lin, Mei-Chuan Lee, Han Siong Toh, Wei-Ting Chang, Sih-Yao Chen, Fang-Hsiu Kuo, Hsin-Ju Tang, Yi-Ming Hua, Dongmei Wei, Jesus Melgarejo, Zhen-Yu Zhang, Chia-Te Liao
    Annals of Intensive Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Sepsis-Induced Cardiomyopathy and Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Yu-Min Lin, Mei-Chuan Lee, Han Siong Toh, Wei-Ting Chang, Sih-Yao Chen, Fang-Hsiu Kuo, Hsin-Ju Tang, Yi-Ming Hua, Dongmei Wei, Jesus Melgarejo, Zhen-Yu Zhang, Chia-Te Liao
    SSRN Electronic Journal .2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy is associated with higher mortality rates in patients with sepsis
    Balaram Krishna J Hanumanthu, Anika Sasidharan Nair, Adarsh Katamreddy, Jason S Gilbert, Jee Young You, Obiageli Lynda Offor, Ankit Kushwaha, Ankita Krishnan, Marzio Napolitano, Leonidas Palaidimos, Joaquin Morante, Seema S. Tekwani, Suchita Mehta, Aancha
    Acute and Critical Care.2021; 36(3): 215.     CrossRef
  • The Correlation Between Whole Blood Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn) Levels and Cu/Zn Ratio and Sepsis-Induced Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction (SILVSD) in Patients with Septic Shock: A Single-Center Prospective Observational Study
    Jian-Biao Meng, Ma-Hong Hu, Ming Zhang, Gong-Pai Hu, Wei Zhang, Shen-Jiang Hu
    International Journal of General Medicine.2021; Volume 14: 7219.     CrossRef
Liver
The role of bilirubin to albumin ratio as a predictor for mortality in critically ill patients without existing liver or biliary tract disease
Ji Soo Choi, Kyung Soo Chung, Eun Hye Lee, Su Hwan Lee, Sang Hoon Lee, Song Yee Kim, Ji Ye Jung, Young Ae Kang, Moo Suk Park, Young Sam Kim, Joon Chang, Ah Young Leem
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(1):24-30.   Published online February 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00738
  • 7,113 View
  • 153 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Hyperbilirubinemia and hypoalbuminemia are frequently appeared and associated with poor prognosis in critically ill patients. We aim to evaluate the association between the bilirubin to albumin ratio and prognosis in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study of 731 patients who were admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) at a tertiary-care center from July 2015 to September 2017. We analyzed the bilirubin to albumin ratio on admission to the MICU, including clinical characteristics and other examinations. Results: The overall 28-day survival of MICU patients was 69.1%. On univariate analysis, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score (P<0.001), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (P<0.001), Simplified Acute Physiology Score II score (P<0.001), Creactive protein (P=0.015), and bilirubin/albumin ratio (P<0.001) were associated with mortality of ICU patients. The receiver operating characteristic curves for ICU patients mortality between bilirubin to albumin ratio and APACHE II score were not statistically significant (P=0.282). On multivariate analysis, higher APACHE II score (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.06; P<0.001) and bilirubin to albumin ratio (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.20; P=0.001) were independently related to the ICU patient mortality. Conclusions: A higher bilirubin to albumin ratio was related to the unfavorable prognosis and mortality in critically ill patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Role of serum bilirubin-to-albumin ratio as a prognostic index in critically ill children
    You Min Kang, Ga Eun Kim, Mireu Park, Jong Deok Kim, Min Jung Kim, Yoon Hee Kim, Kyung Won Kim, Myung Hyun Son, Soo Yeon Kim
    Clinical and Experimental Pediatrics.2023; 66(2): 85.     CrossRef
  • Association between total bilirubin/Albumin ratio and all-cause mortality in acute kidney injury patients: A retrospective cohort study
    Ximei Huang, Yunhua Huang, Min Chen, Lin Liao, Faquan Lin, Eranga Sanjeewa Wijewickrama
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(11): e0287485.     CrossRef
  • The value of albumin-related ratios in predicting disease severity and mortality in acute cholangitis
    Bayram YEŞİL, Bünyamin SEVİM
    Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine.2023; 6(6): 1244.     CrossRef
  • Hepatic dysfunction in critically ill patients
    Jeong Hoon Yang
    Acute and Critical Care.2020; 35(1): 44.     CrossRef
Basic science and research
Changes in Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Level in Patients with Sepsis and Septic Shock
Sang Hoon Lee, Byung Hoon Park, Joo Han Song, Song Yee Kim, Kyung Soo Chung, Eun Young Kim, Ji Ye Jung, Young Sam Kim, Se Kyu Kim, Joon Chang, Moo Suk Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(4):324-333.   Published online November 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00024
  • 7,398 View
  • 117 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Despite many ongoing, prospective studies on the topic, sepsis still remains one of the main causes of death in hospital. The hormone insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has a similar molecular structure to that of insulin. IGF-1 exerts anabolic effects and plays important roles in both normal physiology and pathologic processes. Previous studies have observed low serum IGF-1 level in patients with critical illnesses. Here, we evaluated changes in IGF-1 level based on survival of septic patients.
Methods
We evaluated 140 patients with sepsis and septic shock (21 with sepsis and 119 with septic shock) admitted to the intensive care unit of a university-affiliated hospital in Korea. Serum IGF-1 level was measured on days 0, 1, 3, and 7. Patients with liver disease were excluded from this study. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA).
Results
Patients with septic shock had significantly lower serum IGF-1 level on days 1 and 3 than patients without septic shock (p = 0.002 and p = 0.007, respectively). Generally, there was a negative relationship between IGF-1 and serum cortisol levels; however, this relationship was only significant on day 3 (p = 0.029). Furthermore, renin showed significantly negative correlation with IGF-1 on day 3 (p = 0.038). IGF-1 level did not show significant difference between survivors and non-survivors.
Conclusions
Our results showed that IGF-1 was associated with septic shock, and that the IGF-1 axis is severely disrupted in septic patients. Additionally, serum cortisol and renin levels were associated with IGF-1 level.
Genetic
Lethal Hyperammonemia due to Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency in a Patient with Severe Septic Shock
Ji An Hwang, Joo Han Song, Young Seok Lee, Kyung Soo Chung, Song Yee Kim, Eun Young Kim, Ji Ye Jung, Young Ae Kang, Young Sam Kim, Joon Chang, Moo Suk Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(2):140-145.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.140
  • 7,447 View
  • 83 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Severe hyperammonemia can occur as a result of inherited or acquired liver enzyme defects in the urea cycle, among which ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common form. We report a very rare case of a 45-year-old Korean male who was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to severe septic shock with acute respiratory failure caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. During his ICU stay with ventilator care, the patient suffered from marked hyperammonemia (>1,700 μg/dL) with abrupt mental change leading to life-threatening cerebral edema. Despite every effort including continuous renal replacement therapy and use of a molecular adsorbent recirculating system (extracorporeal liver support–albumin dialysis) to lower his serum ammonia level, the patient was not recovered. The lethal hyperammonemia in the patient was later proven to be a manifestation of acquired liver enzyme defect known as OTCD, which is triggered by serious catabolic conditions, such as severe septic shock with acute respiratory failure.
Hematology/Pulmonary
Delayed Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Presenting as Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage
Ji Young Hong, Ji Ye Jung, Young Ae Kang, Yoon Sung Bae, Young Sam Kim, Se Kyu Kim, Joon Chang, Moo Suk Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):43-47.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.43
  • 7,019 View
  • 114 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical intravascular hemolytic anemia with schistocytosis, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. Pulmonary involvement in HUS is known to be rare. We present the case of a 25-year-old male with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and myocarditis followed by atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. In this case, successful treatments included steroid pulse therapy for the fatal alveolar hemorrhage and plasma exchange for the hemolytic uremic syndrome.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Development and pilot implementation of Iranian Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Registry
    Mina Lazem, Nakysa Hooman, Abbas Sheikhtaheri
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Lessons learned from hemolytic uremic syndrome registries: recommendations for implementation
    Mina Lazem, Abbas Sheikhtaheri, Nakysa Hooman
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Prevalence and Incidence of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocol Study
    Nakysa Hooman, Mahnaz Sadeghian, Fariba Jahangiri, Soudabeh Hosseini
    Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Subcapsular liver hematoma as a complication of an atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome
    Emanuel Ferreira, Nuno Oliveira, Maria Marques, Helena Pinto, Ana Santos, Armando Carreira, Mário Campos
    Nefrología (English Edition).2015; 35(3): 337.     CrossRef
  • Subcapsular liver hematoma as a complication of an atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome
    Emanuel Ferreira, Nuno Oliveira, Maria Marques, Helena Pinto, Ana Santos, Armando Carreira, Mário Campos
    Nefrología.2015; 35(3): 337.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care