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Jae Young Moon 12 Articles
Pulmonary
Erratum to “Utilization of pain and sedation therapy on noninvasive mechanical ventilation in Korean intensive care units: a multi-center prospective observational study”
Taehee Kim, Jung Soo Kim, Eun Young Choi, Youjin Chang, Won-Il Choi, Jae-Joon Hwang, Jae Young Moon, Kwangha Lee, Sei Won Kim, Hyung Koo Kang, Yun Su Sim, Tai Sun Park, Seung Yong Park, Sunghoon Park, Jae Hwa Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(2):172-172.   Published online May 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00164.e1
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2020;35(4):255
  • 3,253 View
  • 60 Download
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Pulmonary
Utilization of pain and sedation therapy on noninvasive mechanical ventilation in Korean intensive care units: a multi-center prospective observational study
Taehee Kim, Jung Soo Kim, Eun Young Choi, Youjin Chang, Won-Il Choi, Jae-Joon Hwang, Jae Young Moon, Kwangha Lee, Sei Won Kim, Hyung Koo Kang, Yun Su Sim, Tai Sun Park, Seung Yong Park, Sunghoon Park, Jae Hwa Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(4):255-262.   Published online November 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00164
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2021;36(2):172
  • 6,383 View
  • 234 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The use of sedative drugs may be an important therapeutic intervention during noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in intensive care units (ICUs). The purpose of this study was to assess the current application of analgosedation in NIV and its impact on clinical outcomes in Korean ICUs.
Methods
Twenty Korean ICUs participated in the study, and data was collected on NIV use during the period between June 2017 and February 2018. Demographic data from all adult patients, NIV clinical parameters, and hospital mortality were included.
Results
A total of 155 patients treated with NIV in the ICUs were included, of whom 26 received pain and sedation therapy (sedation group) and 129 did not (control group). The primary cause of ICU admission was due to acute exacerbation of obstructed lung disease (45.7%) in the control group and pneumonia treatment (53.8%) in the sedation group. In addition, causes of NIV application included acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in the control group (62.8%) and post-extubation respiratory failure in the sedation group (57.7%). Arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels before and after 2 hours of NIV treatment were significantly decreased in both groups: from 61.9±23.8 mm Hg to 54.9±17.6 mm Hg in the control group (P<0.001) and from 54.9±15.1 mm Hg to 51.1±15.1 mm Hg in the sedation group (P=0.048). No significant differences were observed in the success rate of NIV weaning, complications, length of ICU stay, ICU survival rate, or hospital survival rate between the groups.
Conclusions
In NIV patients, analgosedation therapy may have no harmful effects on complications, NIV weaning success, and mortality compared to the control group. Therefore, sedation during NIV may not be unsafe and can be used in patients for pain control when indicated.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sedation and analgesia strategies for non-invasive mechanical ventilation: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Baolu Yang, Leyi Gao, Zhaohui Tong
    Heart & Lung.2024; 63: 42.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Music Therapy and Sound Isolation on the Comfort of Mechanically Ventilated Patients
    Sinem Çalışkan, Esra Akın, Mehmet Uyar
    Turkish Journal of Intensive Care.2024; 22(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • 2021 KSCCM clinical practice guidelines for pain, agitation, delirium, immobility, and sleep disturbance in the intensive care unit
    Yijun Seo, Hak-Jae Lee, Eun Jin Ha, Tae Sun Ha
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Comfort During Non-invasive Ventilation
    Gianmaria Cammarota, Rachele Simonte, Edoardo De Robertis
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current status of treatment of acute respiratory failure in Korea
    Yong Jun Choi, Jae Hwa Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 124.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: noninvasive mechanical ventilation
    Sunghoon Park
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 144.     CrossRef
  • Dexmedetomidine-Induced Aortic Contraction Involves Transactivation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Rats
    Soo Hee Lee, Seong-Chun Kwon, Seong-Ho Ok, Seung Hyun Ahn, Sung Il Bae, Ji-Yoon Kim, Yeran Hwang, Kyeong-Eon Park, Mingu Kim, Ju-Tae Sohn
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(8): 4320.     CrossRef
Ethics
The quality of dying and death for patients in intensive care units: a single center pilot study
Yanghwan Choi, Myoungrin Park, Da Hyun Kang, Jooseon Lee, Jae Young Moon, Heejoon Ahn
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(3):192-201.   Published online April 8, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00374
  • 8,527 View
  • 173 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
To identify the necessary care for dying patients in intensive care units (ICUs), we designed a retrospective study to evaluate the quality of dying and death (QODD) experienced by the surrogates of patients with medical illness who died in the ICU of a tertiary referral hospital.
Methods
To achieve our objective, the authors compared the QODD scores as appraised by the relatives of patients who died of cancer under hospice care with those who died in the ICU. For this study, a Korean version of the QODD questionnaire was developed, and individual interviews were also conducted.
Results
Sixteen people from the intensive care group and 23 people from the hospice care group participated in the survey and completed the questionnaire. The family members of patients who died in the ICU declined participation at a high rate (50%), with the primary reason being to avoid bringing back painful memories (14 people, 87.5%). The relatives of the intensive care group obtained an average total score on the 17-item QODD questionnaire, which was significantly lower than that of the relatives of the hospice group (48.7±15.5 vs. 60.3±14.8, P=0.03).
Conclusions
This work implies that there are unmet needs for the care of dying patients and for the QODD in tertiary hospital ICUs. This result suggests that shared decision making for advance care planning should be encouraged and that education on caring for dying patients should be provided to healthcare professionals to improve the QODD in Korean ICUs.

Citations

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  • Recent Trends in the Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Treatment in Patients with Acute Cerebrovascular Disease : 2017–2021
    Seung Hwan Kim, Ji Hwan Jang, Young Zoon Kim, Kyu Hong Kim, Taek Min Nam
    Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society.2024; 67(1): 73.     CrossRef
  • Family Members’ Feedback on the “Quality of Death” of Adult Patients Who Died in Intensive Care Units and the Factors Affecting the Death Quality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Kazuaki Naya, Hideaki Sakuramoto, Gen Aikawa, Akira Ouchi, Shun Yoshihara, Yuma Ota, Saiko Okamoto, Ayako Fukushima, Haruyoshi Hirashima
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with the quality of dying and death and missed nursing care
    Shahin Gahramani, Mokhtar Mahmoudi, Nouri, Sina Valiee
    International Journal of Palliative Nursing.2024; 30(4): 190.     CrossRef
  • Quality of dying and death in intensive care units: family satisfaction
    Fur-Hsing Wen, Ming Chu Chiang, Chung-Chi Huang, Tsung-Hui Hu, Wen-Chi Chou, Li-Pang Chuang, Siew Tzuh Tang
    BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care.2023; 13(e3): e1217.     CrossRef
  • Development of an End-of-Life Nursing Care Protocol for Intensive Care Units
    Jungeun Kim, Hye Young Yun, Euni Ji Kim, Hyunsook Kim, Geon Ah Kim, Sung Ha Kim, Jayoung Koo, Ju Youn Park, Aisoon Park, Eugene Han, So Yeon Kim, Jihye Jeong, Sanghee Kim
    Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing.2022; 24(4): E159.     CrossRef
  • Nurses’ perceptions of barriers and supportive behaviors in end-of-life care in the intensive care unit: a cross-sectional study
    Dan-dan Xu, Dan Luo, Jie Chen, Ji-li Zeng, Xiao-lin Cheng, Jin Li, Juan-juan Pei, Fen Hu
    BMC Palliative Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Quality of Dying and Death of Advanced Cancer Patients in Palliative Care and Its Association With Place of Death and Quality of Care
    Daniel Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Rafael Gómez-García, María Luisa Martín Roselló, Antonio I. Cuesta-Vargas
    Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing.2021; 23(3): 264.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Anesthesiologists in Perioperative Limitation of Potentially Life-Sustaining Medical Treatments: A Narrative Review and Perspective
    Tera Cushman, David B. Waisel, Miriam M. Treggiari
    Anesthesia & Analgesia.2021; 133(3): 663.     CrossRef
  • Decision-Making Processes in Surrogates of Cancer Patients in a Taiwan Intensive Care Unit
    Wan-Na Sun, Hsin-Tien Hsu, Nai-Ying Ko, Yu-Tung Huang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(12): 4443.     CrossRef
Cardiology
Application of sepsis-3 criteria to Korean patients with critical illnesses
Jae Yeol Kim, Hwan Il Kim, Gee Young Suh, Sang Won Yoon, Tae-Yop Kim, Sang Haak Lee, Jae Young Moon, Jae-Young Kwon, Sungwon Na, Ho Geol Ryu, Jisook Park, Younsuck Koh
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(2):172-172.   Published online April 2, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00318.e1
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2019;34(1):30
  • 4,271 View
  • 116 Download
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Infection
Application of Sepsis-3 Criteria to Korean Patients with Critical Illnesses
Jae Yeol Kim, Hwan Il Kim, Gee Young Suh, Sang Won Yoon, Tae-Yop Kim, Sang Haak Lee, Jae Young Moon, Jae-Young Kwon, Sungwon Na, Ho Geol Ryu, Jisook Park, Younsuck Koh
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(1):30-37.   Published online January 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00318
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2019;34(2):172
  • 8,101 View
  • 173 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The 2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM)/European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) task force for Sepsis-3 devised new definitions for sepsis, sepsis with organ dysfunction and septic shock. Although Sepsis-3 was data-driven, evidence-based approach, East Asian descents comprised minor portions of the project population. Methods: We selected Korean participants from the fever and antipyretics in critically ill patients evaluation (FACE) study, a joint study between Korea and Japan. We calculated the concordance rates for sepsis diagnosis between Sepsis-2 and Sepsis-3 criteria and evaluated mortality rates of sepsis, sepsis with organ dysfunction, and septic shock by Sepsis-3 criteria using the selected data. Results: Korean participants of the FACE study were 913 (383 with sepsis and 530 without sepsis by Sepsis-2 criteria). The concordance rate for sepsis diagnosis between Sepsis-2 and Sepsis-3 criteria was 55.4%. The intensive care unit (ICU) and 28-day mortality rates of sepsis, sepsis with organ dysfunction, and septic shock patients according to Sepsis-3 criteria were 26.2% and 31.0%, 27.5% and 32.5%, and 40.8% and 43.4%, respectively. The quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) was inferior not only to SOFA but also to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) for predicting ICU and 28-day mortality. Conclusions: The concordance rates for sepsis diagnosis between Sepsis-2 and Sepsis-3 criteria were low. Mortality rate for septic shock in Koreans was consistent with estimates made by the 2016 SCCM/ESICM task force. SOFA and SIRS were better than qSOFA for predicting ICU and 28-day mortality in Korean ICU patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • HYPOTENSION AT THE TIME OF SEPSIS RECOGNITION IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED MORTALITY IN SEPSIS PATIENTS WITH NORMAL LACTATE LEVELS
    Ji Hwan Kim, Yong Kyun Kim, Dong Kyu Oh, Kyeongman Jeon, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Gee Young Suh, Sung Yun Lim, Yeon Joo Lee, Young-Jae Cho, Mi-Hyeon Park, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Sunghoon Park
    Shock.2023; 59(3): 360.     CrossRef
  • The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: research priorities for the administration, epidemiology, scoring and identification of sepsis
    Mark E. Nunnally, Ricard Ferrer, Greg S. Martin, Ignacio Martin-Loeches, Flavia R. Machado, Daniel De Backer, Craig M. Coopersmith, Clifford S. Deutschman, Massimo Antonelli, Judith Hellman, Sameer Jog, Jozef Kesecioglu, Ishaq Lat, Mitchell M. Levy
    Intensive Care Medicine Experimental.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Rapid response system
Rapid Response Systems Reduce In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest: A Pilot Study and Motivation for a Nationwide Survey
Yeonhee Park, Jong-Joon Ahn, Byung Ju Kang, Young Seok Lee, Sang-Ook Ha, Jin-Soo Min, Woo-Hyun Cho, Se-Hee Na, Dong-Hyun Lee, Seung-Yong Park, Goo-Hyeon Hong, Hyun-Jung Kim, Sangwoo Shim, Jung-Hyun Kim, Seok-Jeong Lee, So-Young Park, Jae Young Moon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(3):231-239.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00024
  • 8,161 View
  • 230 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Early recognition of the signs and symptoms of clinical deterioration could diminish the incidence of cardiopulmonary arrest. The present study investigates outcomes with respect to cardiopulmonary arrest rates in institutions with and without rapid response systems (RRSs) and the current level of cardiopulmonary arrest rate in tertiary hospitals. Methods: This was a retrospective study based on data from 14 tertiary hospitals. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rate reports were obtained from each hospital to include the number of cardiopulmonary arrest events in adult patients in the general ward, the annual adult admission statistics, and the structure of the RRS if present. Results: Hospitals with RRSs showed a statistically significant reduction of the CPR rate between 2013 and 2015 (odds ratio [OR], 0.731; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.577 to 0.927; P = 0.009). Nevertheless, CPR rates of 2013 and 2015 did not change in hospitals without RRS (OR, 0.988; 95% CI, 0.868 to 1.124; P = 0.854). National university-affiliated hospitals showed less cardiopulmonary arrest rate than private university-affiliated in 2015 (1.92 vs. 2.40; OR, 0.800; 95% CI, 0.702 to 0.912; P = 0.001). High-volume hospitals showed lower cardiopulmonary arrest rates compared with medium-volume hospitals in 2013 (1.76 vs. 2.63; OR, 0.667; 95% CI, 0.577 to 0.772; P < 0.001) and in 2015 (1.55 vs. 3.20; OR, 0.485; 95% CI, 0.428 to 0.550; P < 0.001). Conclusions: RRSs may be a feasible option to reduce the CPR rate. The discrepancy in cardiopulmonary arrest rates suggests further research should include a nationwide survey to tease out factors involved in in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest and differences in outcomes based on hospital characteristics.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Society of Critical Care Medicine Guidelines on Recognizing and Responding to Clinical Deterioration Outside the ICU: 2023
    Kimia Honarmand, Randy S. Wax, Daleen Penoyer, Geoffery Lighthall, Valerie Danesh, Bram Rochwerg, Michael L. Cheatham, Daniel P. Davis, Michael DeVita, James Downar, Dana Edelson, Alison Fox-Robichaud, Shigeki Fujitani, Raeann M. Fuller, Helen Haskell, Ma
    Critical Care Medicine.2024; 52(2): 314.     CrossRef
  • 2020 Korean Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Part 4. Adult advanced life support
    Jaehoon Oh, Kyoung-Chul Cha, Jong-Hwan Lee, Seungmin Park, Dong-Hyeok Kim, Byung Kook Lee, Jung Soo Park, Woo Jin Jung, Dong Keon Lee, Young Il Roh, Tae Youn Kim, Sung Phil Chung, Young-Min Kim, June Dong Park, Han-Suk Kim, Mi Jin Lee, Sang-Hoon Na, Gyu C
    Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine.2021; 8(S): S26.     CrossRef
  • Intensivists' Direct Management without Residents May Improve the Survival Rate Compared to High-Intensity Intensivist Staffing in Academic Intensive Care Units: Retrospective and Crossover Study Design
    Jin Hyoung Kim, Jihye Kim, SooHyun Bae, Taehoon Lee, Jong-Joon Ahn, Byung Ju Kang
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Influence of the Rapid Response Team Activation via Screening by Nurses on Unplanned Intensive Care Unit Admissions
    Ye-Ji Huh, Seongmi Moon, Eun Kyeung Song, Minyoung Kim
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2020; 32(5): 539.     CrossRef
  • Rapid response systems in Korea
    Bo Young Lee, Sang-Bum Hong
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(2): 108.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
The Ability of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) IV Score to Predict Mortality in a Single Tertiary Hospital
Jae Woo Choi, Young Sun Park, Young Seok Lee, Yeon Hee Park, Chaeuk Chung, Dong Il Park, In Sun Kwon, Ju Sang Lee, Na Eun Min, Jeong Eun Park, Sang Hoon Yoo, Gyu Rak Chon, Young Hoon Sul, Jae Young Moon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(3):275-283.   Published online August 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00990
  • 16,667 View
  • 403 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II model has been widely used in Korea. However, there have been few studies on the APACHE IV model in Korean intensive care units (ICUs). The aim of this study was to compare the ability of APACHE IV and APACHE II in predicting hospital mortality, and to investigate the ability of APACHE IV as a critical care triage criterion. Methods: The study was designed as a prospective cohort study. Measurements of discrimination and calibration were performed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test respectively. We also calculated the standardized mortality ratio (SMR). Results: The APACHE IV score, the Charlson Comorbidity index (CCI) score, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and unplanned ICU admissions were independently associated with hospital mortality. The calibration, discrimination, and SMR of APACHE IV were good (H = 7.67, P = 0.465; C = 3.42, P = 0.905; AUROC = 0.759; SMR = 1.00). However, the explanatory power of an APACHE IV score >93 alone on hospital mortality was low at 44.1%. The explanatory power was increased to 53.8% when the hospital mortality was predicted using a model that considers APACHE IV >93 scores, medical admission, and risk factors for CCI >3 coincidentally. However, the discriminative ability of the prediction model was unsatisfactory (C index <0.70). Conclusions: The APACHE IV presented good discrimination, calibration, and SMR for hospital mortality.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Circadian rhythms of vital signs are associated with in-hospital mortality in critically ill patients: A retrospective observational study
    Zhengning Yang, Xiaoxia Xie, Xu Zhang, Lan Li, Ruoxue Bai, Hui Long, Yanna Ma, Zhenliang Hui, Yujie Qi, Jun Chen
    Chronobiology International.2023; 40(3): 262.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and outcomes of patients admitted to adult intensive care units in Hong Kong: a population retrospective cohort study from 2008 to 2018
    Lowell Ling, Chun Ming Ho, Pauline Yeung Ng, King Chung Kenny Chan, Hoi Ping Shum, Cheuk Yan Chan, Alwin Wai Tak Yeung, Wai Tat Wong, Shek Yin Au, Kit Hung Anne Leung, Jacky Ka Hing Chan, Chi Keung Ching, Oi Yan Tam, Hin Hung Tsang, Ting Liong, Kin Ip Law
    Journal of Intensive Care.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation and Validation of Four Scoring Systems: the APACHE IV, SAPS III, MPM0 II, and ICMM in Critically Ill Cancer Patients

    Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2020; 24(4): 263.     CrossRef
Major Obstacles to Implement a Full-Time Intensivist in Korean Adult ICUs: a Questionnaire Survey
Jun Wan Lee, Jae Young Moon, Seok Wha Youn, Yong Sup Shin, Sang Il Park, Dong Chan Kim, Younsuk Koh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(3):262-262.   Published online August 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.111.e01
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2016;31(2):111
  • 5,085 View
  • 80 Download
  • 1 Crossref
PDF

Citations

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  • Challenges experienced by health care professionals working in resource-poor intensive care settings in the Limpopo province of South Africa
    Hulisani Malelelo-Ndou, Dorah U. Ramathuba, Khathutshelo G. Netshisaulu
    Curationis.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Policy
Major Obstacles to Implement a Full-Time Intensivist in Korean Adult ICUs: a Questionnaire Survey
Jun Wan Lee, Jae Young Moon, Seok Wha Youn, Yong Sup Shin, Sang Il Park, Dong Chan Kim, Younsuk Koh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(2):111-117.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.111
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2016;31(3):262
  • 8,488 View
  • 113 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background:
Critical care physician staffing is a crucial element of the intensive care unit (ICU) organization, and is associated with better outcomes in ICUs. Adult ICUs in Korea have been suffering from inadequate full-time intensivists and nurses because of insufficient reimbursement rates (<50% of the original critical care cost) from the National Health Insurance System. Recently, full-time intensivists have been introduced as a prerequisite for adult ICUs of tertiary hospitals in Korea. The purpose of this study was to examine the perception of intensivist staffing among critical care program directors regarding the barriers and solutions when implementing an intensivist model of critical care in Korea.
Methods
An email survey of critical care program directors in designated teaching hospitals for critical care subspecialty training by the Korean Society of Critical Care Medicine was performed. The survey domains included vision, culture, resources, barriers, and potential solutions to implementing intensivist physician staffing (IPS).
Results
Forty-two critical care program directors were surveyed. A total of 28 directors (66.7%) responded to email queries. Of these, 27 directors (96.4%) agreed that IPS would improve the quality of care in the ICU, although half of them reported a negative perception of relevant clinical colleagues for the role of full-time intensivists and poor resources for IPS in their hospitals. Increased financial burden due to hiring full-time intensivists and concerns regarding exclusion from the management of their critically ill patients in the ICU, together with loss of income for primary attending physicians were stated by the respondents to be major barriers to implementing IPS. Financial incentives for the required cost from the health insurance system and enhancement of medical law relevant to critical care were regarded as solutions to these issues.
Conclusions
Critical care program directors believe that intensivist-led critical care can improve the outcome of ICUs. They indicated the financial burden due to IPS and underestimation of a full-time intensivist’s role to be major barriers. The program directors agreed that a partnership between hospital leaders and the Ministry of Health and Welfare was needed to overcome these barriers.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Incidence and Mortality Trends in Critically Ill Children: A Korean Population-Based Study
    Jaeyoung Choi, Esther Park, Ah Young Choi, Meong Hi Son, Joongbum Cho
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Willingness to pay for family education and counselling services provided by critical care advanced practice nurses
    Chung Mee Ko, Chin Kang Koh, Sangho Kwon
    International Journal of Nursing Practice.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Kyung Sook Hong
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Pulmonary
Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Young-Jae Cho, Jae Young Moon, Ein-Soon Shin, Je Hyeong Kim, Hoon Jung, So Young Park, Ho Cheol Kim, Yun Su Sim, Chin Kook Rhee, Jaemin Lim, Seok Jeong Lee, Won-Yeon Lee, Hyun Jeong Lee, Sang Hyun Kwak, Eun Kyeong Kang, Kyung Soo Chung, Won-Il Choi, The Korean Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Consensus Group
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(2):76-100.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.76
  • 16,837 View
  • 352 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

Citations

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  • Association between mechanical power and intensive care unit mortality in Korean patients under pressure-controlled ventilation
    Jae Kyeom Sim, Sang-Min Lee, Hyung Koo Kang, Kyung Chan Kim, Young Sam Kim, Yun Seong Kim, Won-Yeon Lee, Sunghoon Park, So Young Park, Ju-Hee Park, Yun Su Sim, Kwangha Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jin Hwa Lee, Heung Bum Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Ji Young Hong
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    Won Ho Han, Jae Hoon Lee, June Young Chun, Young Ju Choi, Youseok Kim, Mira Han, Jee Hee Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(1): 41.     CrossRef
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    Young Sam Kim
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 151.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Jin-Young Kim, Sang-Bum Hong
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 157.     CrossRef
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    Rob Mac Sweeney, Daniel F McAuley
    The Lancet.2017; 389(10078): 1516.     CrossRef
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    Gianfranco Umberto Meduri, Andreas Schwingshackl, Greet Hermans
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care