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Ghazaleh Eslamian 3 Articles
Nutrition
Association of nutrition risk screening 2002 and Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool with COVID-19 severity in hospitalized patients in Iran
Ghazaleh Eslamian, Sohrab Sali, Mansour Babaei, Karim Parastouei, Dorsa Arman Moghadam
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):332-338.   Published online July 5, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01830
  • 3,290 View
  • 182 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Malnutrition affects normal body function and is associated with disease severity and mortality. Due to the high prevalence of malnutrition reported in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the current study examined the association between malnutrition and disease severity in hospitalized adult patients with COVID-19 in Iran.
Methods
In this prospective observational study, 203 adult patients with COVID-19 verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction test and chest computed tomography were recruited from those admitted to a university hospital in Iran. To determine COVID-19 intensity, patients were categorized into four groups. Malnutrition assessment was based on the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) and nutrition risk screening score (NRS-2002). An ordinal regression model was run to assess the association between malnutrition and disease severity.
Results
In the studies sample of Iranian patients with COVID-19, 38.3% of patients had severe COVID-19. According to NRS-2002, 12.9% of patients were malnourished. Based on MUST, 2% of patients were at medium, and 13.4% of patients were at high risk of malnutrition. Malnutrition was associated with a higher odds of extremely severe COVID-19 according to NRS-2002 (odds ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.21–2.56; P=0.021).
Conclusions
Malnutrition was not prevalent in the studies sample of Iranian patients with COVID-19; however, it was associated with a higher odds of extremely severe COVID-19.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Computational methods for studying relationship between nutritional status and respiratory viral diseases: a systematic review
    Zakir Hussain, Malaya Dutta Borah, Rezaul Karim Ahmed
    Artificial Intelligence Review.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predictive value of multiple variable models including nutritional risk score (NRS 2002) on mortality and length of stay of patients with covid-19 infections. The INCOVO study
    Ghadamieh Fatemeh, Ginette Fotsing, Pedro Marques-Vidal, Peter Kopp, Mohammed Barigou
    Clinical Nutrition ESPEN.2023; 55: 357.     CrossRef
Nutrition
Associations between systemic inflammation and intestinal permeability with Onodera's prognostic nutritional index in critically ill patients
Seyed Hossein Ardehali, Ghazaleh Eslamian, Shirin Malek
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(4):361-368.   Published online November 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00178
  • 4,069 View
  • 98 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Malnutrition is a potentially costly problem in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationships between the Onodera’s prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) and intestinal permeability and between OPNI and systemic inflammation in critically ill patients.
Methods
This was a cross-sectional study conducted in the general ICU of a university-affiliated hospital. A total of 162 ICU-hospitalized adult patients admitted between May 2018 and December 2019, was included in the study sample. The OPNI was calculated at admission and categorized as ≤40 or >40. We assessed plasma endotoxin and zonulin concentrations as markers of intestinal permeability as well as serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) as markers of systemic inflammation upon admission under stringent conditions. The relationships between these markers and OPNI were assessed after adjusting for potential confounders through estimation of a binary logistic regression model.
Results
Median (interquartile range) hs-CRP, IL-6 zonulin, and endotoxin were significantly greater in the low OPNI subgroup than in the high OPNI subgroup (all P<0.05). Multivariate analyses showed significant association between serum IL-6 (odds ratio [OR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64–0.96), serum hs-CRP (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.53–0.92), plasma endotoxin (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.72–0.93), and plasma zonulin (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.75–0.98) levels with OPNI in the overall population.
Conclusions
Our results provide evidence that higher plasma endotoxin, zonulin, IL-6, and hs-CRP levels are associated with progressively lower OPNI in mixed ICU populations, particularly in surgical ICU patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of malnutrition status with 30-day mortality in patients with sepsis using objective nutritional indices: a multicenter retrospective study
    Moon Seong Baek, Young Suk Kwon, Sang Soo Kang, Daechul Shim, Youngsang Yoon, Jong Ho Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2024; 39(1): 127.     CrossRef
  • Practical parameters that can be used for nutritional assessment in patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit with the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
    Ramazan Baldemir, Mustafa Özgür Cirik
    Medicine.2022; 101(24): e29433.     CrossRef
  • Nutritional Status, Body Composition, and Inflammation Profile in Older Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 4–5: A Case-Control Study
    Mar Ruperto, Guillermina Barril
    Nutrients.2022; 14(17): 3650.     CrossRef
Infection
Association of vitamin D deficiency with COVID-19 severity and mortality in Iranian people: a prospective observational study
Alireza Fatemi, Seyed Hossein Ardehali, Ghazaleh Eslamian, Morvarid Noormohammadi, Shirin Malek
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(4):300-307.   Published online November 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00605
  • 6,154 View
  • 129 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to escalate, it is important to identify the prognostic factors related to increased mortality and disease severity. To assess the possible associations of vitamin D level with disease severity and survival, we studied 248 hospitalized COVID-19 patients in a single center in a prospective observational study from October 2020 to May 2021 in Tehran, Iran.
Methods
Patients who had a record of their 25-hydroxyvitamin D level measured in the previous year before testing positive with COVID-19 were included. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was measured upon admission in COVID-19 patients. The associations between clinical outcomes of patients and 25-hydroxyvitamin D level were assessed by adjusting for potential confounders and estimating a multivariate logistic regression model.
Results
The median (interquartile range) age of patients was 60 years (44–74 years), and 53% were male. The median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level prior to admission decreased with increasing COVID-19 severity (P=0.009). Similar findings were obtained when comparing median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D on admission between moderate and severe patients (P=0.014). A univariate logistic regression model showed that vitamin D deficiency prior to COVID-19 was associated with a significant increase in the odds of mortality (odds ratio, 2.01; P=0.041). The Multivariate Cox model showed that vitamin D deficiency on admission was associated with a significant increase in risk for mortality (hazard ratio, 2.35; P=0.019).
Conclusions
Based on our results, it is likely that deficient vitamin D status is associated with increased mortality in COVID-19 patients. Thus, evaluating vitamin D level in COVID-19 patients is warranted.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The close association of micronutrients with COVID-19
    Aimin Zhang, Yue Yin, Jiashu Tian, Xialin Wang, Zhihong Yue, Lin Pei, Li Liu, Li Qin, Mei Jia, Hui Wang, Qingwei Ma, Wei-bo Gao, Lin-Lin Cao
    Heliyon.2024; 10(7): e28629.     CrossRef
  • The bounds of meta-analytics and an alternative method
    Ramalingam Shanmugam, Mohammad Tabatabai, Derek Wilus, Karan P Singh
    Epidemiology and Health.2024; : e2024016.     CrossRef
  • Systematic Mendelian randomization study of the effect of gut microbiome and plasma metabolome on severe COVID-19
    Han Yan, Si Zhao, Han-Xue Huang, Pan Xie, Xin-He Cai, Yun-Dan Qu, Wei Zhang, Jian-Quan Luo, Longbo Zhang, Xi Li
    Frontiers in Immunology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors Associated with Severity and Death from COVID-19 in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Study
    Ahmad Mehri, Sahar Sotoodeh Ghorbani, Kosar Farhadi-Babadi, Elham Rahimi, Zahra Barati, Niloufar Taherpour, Neda Izadi, Fatemeh Shahbazi, Yaser Mokhayeri, Arash Seifi, Saeid Fallah, Rezvan Feyzi, Koorosh Etemed, Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari
    Journal of Intensive Care Medicine.2023; 38(9): 825.     CrossRef
  • Vitamin D: A Role Also in Long COVID-19?
    Luigi Barrea, Ludovica Verde, William B. Grant, Evelyn Frias-Toral, Gerardo Sarno, Claudia Vetrani, Florencia Ceriani, Eloisa Garcia-Velasquez, José Contreras-Briceño, Silvia Savastano, Annamaria Colao, Giovanna Muscogiuri
    Nutrients.2022; 14(8): 1625.     CrossRef

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