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In Gyu Hyun 3 Articles
Dantrolene and Post-operative Hyperthermia: A Case Report
Ja Kyung Koo, Cheol Hong Kim, Ah Leum Lim, Se Ah Kwon, Ji Young Park, Soon Jae Lee, In Gyu Hyun, Je Hyun Yoo
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2009;24(2):92-98.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2009.24.2.92
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Malignant hyperthermia is a rare, fatal pharmacogenetic disorder that occurs during general anesthesia following exposure to a depolarizing muscle relaxant, such as succinylcholine, or volatile anesthetics. Clinical findings in malignant hyperthermia include muscle rigidity, sinus tachycardia, increased CO2 production, skin cyanosis with mottling, and marked hyperthermia. For treatment, cooling techniques must be accompanied by discontinuation of the provocative medication. Furthermore, dantrolene administration is the mainstay of treatment for malignant hyperthermia, and should be initiated as soon as the diagnosis is suspected. We recently experienced a case with post-operative fever of 41.0degrees C refractory to conventional anti-pyretic measures and finally resolved with dantrolene administration, in a patient with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus monoarthritis of the knee and rapid progression of diffuse septic pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation.
Diagnosis of Acid-base Imbalance by Stewart's Physicochemical Approach and Mortality Prediction in Severe Burn Patients with Inhalation Injury
Sunghoon Park, Cheol Hong Kim, In Gyu Hyun, Ki Suck Jung
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2006;21(1):17-27.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Acid-base derangement are commonly encountered in critically ill patients. This study is to investigate underlying mechanisms of acid-base imbalance and also to examine whether they can predict mortality in burn patients.
METHODS
We retrospectively reviewed 73 severely burned patients who had admitted to burn intensive care unit, from January to July in 2004. All the patients had inhalation injury, identified by bronchoscopic examination. We analyzed the type and nature of the acid-base imbalances from arterial blood gas analysis, electrolytes and other biological tests between survivors and non-survivors for 30 days after admission.
RESULTS
Acidosis was the most common disorder during the early and late hospital periods. Large fractions of those showed decreased strong ion difference (SID), increased anion gap corrected by albumin (AGc) and [Cl-]corrected. Mixed disorder and alkalosis emerged after the 7(th) hospital day. As time went by, albumin, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, pH and SID were more decreased in non-survivors (n=28) than in survivors (n=45) while [Cl-] corrected, alveolar-arterial oxygen tension gradients, peripheral WBC counts and CRP were more increased in non-survivors than in survivors. In the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves for mortality prediction, APACHE II score and % of total body surface area (%TBSA) burn were high: 0.866 (95% CI; 0.785~0.946) for APACHE II score, 0.817 (95% CI; 0.717~0.918) for %TBSA burn.
CONCLUSIONS
In burned patients with inhalation injury, various types of acid-base imbalances and electrolytes abnormalities emerged after resuscitation and so, more careful attentions pursued for correcting underlying acid-base derangement.
Clinical Characteristics in Patients with Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Colonization or Infection during 5 years in a Private General Hospital
Jin Kyung Kim, Cheol Hong Kim, Seung Yong Han, Hyeon Woo Byun, Woo Jung Park, Heung Jeong Woo, In Gyu Hyun, Jae Jung Lee, Kyu Man Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2005;20(1):54-62.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is increasing rapidly through the world and is now a major cause of nosocomial infection. The transmission dynamics and factors contributing their dissemination are complex. We conducted a study to investigate clinical characteristics in patients with VRE colonization or infection during recent 5 years. METHODS: 154 cases that had the VRE infection or colonization from January 1, 2000 to April, 2004, were reviewed. We analyzed the risk factors of VRE infection and colonization and also compared various parameters contributing their dissemination between burn and non-burn patients with VRE. RESULTS: Total 212 strains of VRE were isolated from 154 patients. Of 212 strains of VRE, Enterococcus faecium (178 strains, 83.9%) were most common and followed by E. casseliflavus (28 strains, 13.2%), E. faecalis (5 strains, 2.4%) and E. gallinaum (1 strains, 0.5%). The most common place of VRE isolation was in burn intensive care unit (ICU), 95 cases (61.7%); 27 cases (17.5%) in general wards; 17 cases (11.0%) in surgical ICU; 15 cases (9.7%) in medical ICU. Compared with patients with VRE colonization, patients with VRE infection had older age, higher APACHE II scores and high death rate significantly. Then, VRE colonization were more common in burn patients while VRE infection were more common in non-burn patients.
CONCLUSIONS
The findings from this study suggest that VRE infection are not uncommon among hospitalized patients. More strict infection control, close surveillance and judicious use of antibiotics may be warranted to prevent infection and transmission of VRE.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care